.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • NEW YORK (AP) — Mike Tyson wants his next knockout to be on Broadway.
    The former boxer announced Monday that he will team up with director Spike Lee to bring his one-man show, “Mike Tyson: Undisputed Truth,” to the Longacre Theatre for six nights only, July 31 to Aug. 5.
    The show, a raw confessional on the highs and lows of the life of the retired heavyweight and tabloid target, will mark both Tyson’s and Lee’s debut on Broadway. It made its debut in April for a weeklong run at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

  • In 2003, local author Harvey Frauenglass conducted interviews with 14 elders of the Dixon/Embudo area. These interviews are now published in “Voices of Dixon: Oral Histories from the Embudo Valley.”
    At 2:30 p.m. Sunday at the Mission in Dixon, the elders interviewed will be honored. There will be readings from the interviews and a reading from New Mexico’s Centennial Poet Levi Romero.
    The presentation will also show and explain the Embudo Valley Library’s new Special Collections website and archives, which presently features Harvey’s interviews and Charlotte Valdez’ History of the Embudo Presbyterian Mission.
    Valdez has gathered an extensive collection of historical documents and photographs from over the years.  

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Noah Wyle is confronting an alien invasion, the death of his wife and the potential annihilation of the human species in “Falling Skies.”
    But he had to face a more personal issue in tackling the role of history professor Tom Mason in TNT’s sci-fi series, returned Sunday for season two: Wyle, 41, has become an elder statesman, relatively speaking.
    “I’m Anthony Edwards,” said Wyle, referring to the “ER” co-star who’s got eight years on him and boasted more credits when they started on the medical drama in 1994. “I’m the guy who’s been around a little longer and has a little more set savvy.”

  • Eating after 8 p.m. Friday has become a habit and somewhat of a necessity because of work schedules and summer concerts. Sure there’s food at the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series, but sometimes the want for something different — and not out of a mobile cart — is strong. And sometimes pizza sounds good, but finding it after 8 p.m. can be virtually impossible.
    However, it’s not completely out of the question if you’re willing to drive just a few miles to White Rock.
    Time Out Pizzeria, located at 118 N.M. 4, between Rover and Sherwood Blvd.  is open until 9 p.m. Monday-Thursday and Sunday; and until 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

  • Parents worry about a multitude of things when their children are concerned. But, what would happen if your child got lost in the woods? Would he know any basic survival principles?  
    Residents are encouraged to bring their children to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday for a free Summer Family Evenings presentation by Bandelier’s Chris Judson titled, “Hug-a-Tree and Survive.”
    The Hug-a-Tree and Survive program was developed by a search and rescue team in California after they were involved in a search for a nine-year-old boy who they felt would have been found if he had just known a few basic things to do when lost.  

  • David and Aimée Thurlo have, together and separately, written more than 70 novels in a variety of genres. At 7 p.m. June 28 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library, the couple will give a presentation as part of the Authors Speak Series.
    The Thurlos’ writing career began when Aimée was inspired to write a novel, while David was teaching middle school. She sat down with a legal pad and pencil, began a romantic intrigue, and soon found David looking over her shoulder whenever class was out. They quickly discovered that they could write with one voice, and their combined efforts resulted in books characterized by the unique stamp that defined their partnership in life and work.

  • In the Pilots and Paws program, pets from overwhelmed kill shelters hitch a flight to communities where they will be adopted. Pilot Jeff Bennett recently flew his 1,000th animal.

  • Getting leadership training is easy for adults in Los Alamos. All they have to do is sign up for a Leadership Los Alamos course.
    Training youth leaders is just as simple. Each year, Los Alamos Youth Leadership has helped high school students in ninth through 12th grade gain confidence and leadership skills that they may use later in life. County Councilor Sharon Stover founded the group in 2005.
    Approximately 25-45 students join LAYL each summer and work with adult leaders from the community that have gone through the Leadership Los Alamos program.
    In fact, several community groups support LAYL and without the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board, Los Alamos National Bank, the Family YMCA and Los Alamos High School, LAYL would not be possible.

  • Today
    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting will be at 6:15 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. For more information, call 661-4097.

    Thursday
    Students working on the Los Alamos Youth Food Project will be guest speakers during lunch at 11:30 a.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.

    Wildflower Walk with PEEC. Join Chick Keller, curator of PEEC’s Jemez Mountains Herbarium for an easy walk along a local trail to learn the names of wildflowers. A plant list will be provided. Meet at PEEC at 5:30 p.m. to carpool or caravan to the trailhead. Free, no registration required. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Before passing away from a brain tumor in December 2009, Julie Meadows and her family got help from friends, the community and fellow church members, organized as “Julie’s Helpers.”   
    Launched in May 2011, the Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship Fund seeks to provide, annually, the kind of help that Meadows would have been proud of. Wife, mother of two young sons, Los Alamos National Laboratory staffer, active member of Alpha Zeta Chapter of Beta Sigma Phi sorority, and member of White Rock Presbyterian Church, Meadows had been tireless in volunteering.