Today's Features

  • For the past two years, The Santa Fe Opera Guild has offered a course for the opera neophyte, opening the door to this world.  Registration filled the sessions almost immediately.  Buoyed by the response, the Guild is offering a new look at opera, “Opera 201.”  The course is open to all, beginners, aficionados and the curious, who would like to know something about this art form.

  • Join Craig Martin, open space specialist for Los Alamos County and Dale Coker, ranger at Bandelier National Monument, for an update on post-fire trail conditions in the county and at the monument. The talk will be at 7 p.m. Feb. 22 at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, 3540 Orange St., and is free and open to the public.
    The Las Conchas Fire devastated many favorite trails in the county and Bandelier, and the floods that followed finished off many others. Martin and Coker will discuss what happened to the local trails and what has been done to repair them, and what work still remains to be done. For people interested in volunteering to help with the repair work, Martin and Coker will provide information on how to get involved.

  • “This is what my honored grandfather told me, all of it. Someone long ago taught him how to tell a tale, someone who knew what to do with the space between en años pasados and así fue. When we sat up together nights, waiting for babies to be born or for horses to foal, for travelers to return, or for news of the men who ran to the mountains after the uprising, he told me of those murderous times …” From the prologue of “The King’s Lizard: A Tale of Murder and Deception in Old Santa Fe,” by Pamela Christie        

  • Once the roses have wilted and the heart-shaped box of chocolates is almost empty, treat your sweetheart to another dose of “romance” at the New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company’s  production of “Dracula,” based on Bram Stoker’s novel.

  • The Los Alamos Friends of the Shelter 2012 Dog Jog is scheduled for April 28 and the search is on for a T-shirt logo.
    Children who love animals and would like a shot at local fame are encouraged to create and submit their T-shirt logo for the contest, adhering to the following guidelines:
    • All entries should be drawn in black ink on white paper. The lines should be thick enough to reproduce properly on a T-shirt.
    • All entries should be no larger than 8.5 x 11 inches in size.
    • The words “Dog Jog 2012” should prominently appear somewhere on the design.
    • The artist’s name, birth date, address, phone number and T-shirt size should be included lightly on the back of the design.

  • Today
    This month’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Board meeting is scheduled for 6:15 p.m. in Building #1, Camino Entrada, Pajarito Cliffs Site. Join us for an update on the Los Alamos Youth Food Project. For more information, call 661-4097.

  • WASHINGTON, D.C. — Ten Society for Science & the Public science fair alumni attended the second White House Science Fair recently, where President Obama honored winners of the nation’s top science competitions and viewed their award-winning projects.
    All 10 students earned recognition by at least one of SSP’s prestigious science education programs: the Intel Science Talent Search, the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, or the Broadcom MASTERS.

  • Wednesday
    Los Alamos High School alumni Abran Chavez and Robert Keyser are slated to discuss their careers as machinists with Los Alamos High School students, from 11:15-11:50 a.m. in the choir room. Both are employed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and will address the students as part of the Ambassador Program, which is sponsored by the Juvenile Justice Advisory Board. Community members are invited to attend, but must sign in at the main office. For more information, contact Maire O’Neill, program coordinator, at 663-2527.

  • Hundreds of stone calendars around the Southwest mark the seasons, but what do the markings mean and what do they predict?
    Hear a talk by Ron Barber on “Stone Calendars of the Southwest,” sponsored by the Los Alamos Mountaineers at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fuller Lodge.
    Barber will share some preliminary results of the Stone Calendar Project, a hobby that somehow got out of hand. Barber was born and raised in the oil fields in the wilds of South America.
    His parents hauled their kids through the mountains, deserts and jungles always in search of new adventures. Encountering indigenous cultures and ancient sites led to a long-term interest and curiosity about lost civilizations. He is an explorer by nature, an engineer by profession.

  • Happy Valentine’s Day! This week, we look at asset number 33, interpersonal competence. This is when a young person demonstrates that he or she has empathy, sensitivity and friendship skills.
    I witnessed a beautiful example of this last weekend at the state district wrestling competition, but let me provide a little background.
    You know, we often recognize athletes when they succeed in their sport and are even more impressed by their ability to maintain good grades while doing it, but what about their character?