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Today's Features

  • Australian singer Wendy Rule will appear live in concert at the Ardantane Dome, south of Jemez Springs, at 6 p.m. Oct. 13. Tickets will be on sale at the door.
     “Wild, passionate and empowering, Australian visionary songstress Wendy Rule weaves music, mythology and ritual together to take her audience on an otherworldly journey of depth and passion,” according to her website.
    “Drawing on her deep love of nature and lifelong fascination with the worlds of fairytale and magic, Wendy’s songs combine irresistible melodies with rich aural textures and a rare personal honesty.”
    Since 1996, Rule has released six major albums. She  has toured Australia extensively and regularly performs in the UK and Europe.
    “Fiercely independent, Rule has carved a unique path through the musical mainstream. Renowned for years amongst the world’s alternative spiritual communities, she is now deservedly gaining a much broader following. Her unique live performances and her beautifully atmospheric and richly emotive songs entice an ever-growing audience into her magical realm,” the website stated.
    The suggested donation for Rule’s performance is $20, although no one will be turned away for lack of funds. For directions to Ardantane, or for more information, call Amber at 505-469-7777.

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Elk’s Lodge, 1600 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Sept. 9, complaint
    Violations: None
    Notes: Meat was brought from Matthew’s Meat Processor on Friday, left at 4 p.m. The pig was butchered and when they picked it up, they had a large metal tub. They placed a tarp inside, placed bags of ice and them placed the pig on the ice, then placed bags of ice on top of the pig. Covered with tarp. When they picked up the pig, it didn’t appear to be cool to the touch. They transported it to Los Alamos, which took approximately 13/4 to two hours. They immediately brought in the pig and began cutting up, unwrapped it and placed it in the refrigerator. Portion by portion got cooked. During cooling, they cooked for an hour at 160 degrees. The servings of food were picked up by some firefighters and taken back to the station. Approximately 30 out of 37 got ill (diarrhea). All ate about 5-6 p.m. Most got ill by 4-5 a.m. USDA will be contacted to investigate Matthew’s Meat Processing in Belen. Elk’s Lodge has been doing this for some time. This has been done 23 other times (approximately 20 years).

    Hot Rocks Java catering, 4200 W. Jemez Road
    Date inspected: Sept. 28

  • The 12th annual PEECnic, Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s  yearly meeting for members and friends will be from 2-4 p.m. Oct. 14.
    There will be activities, talks, and cider filling the air at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    PEEC traditionally holds its annual meeting in the fall, when Bandelier’s Park Flight ornithologist interns are still in town, so that attendees can learn about birds found across the Americas.  
    The PEECnic features illustrated talks by the interns, kids’ activities and light refreshments.
    This year, kids will be making a scarecrow to enter in the MainStreet scarecrow contest and there will be a cider press with plenty of apples to turn into juice.   
    Finally, PEEC members will vote on the board of directors for the coming year.
    As a special thank you to the community for encouraging county council to vote for a new nature center for Los Alamos, there will be a slideshow of PEEC’s history.  
    Council received hundreds of letters and emails from community members in support of the nature center.   
    The PEECnic is free and open to all, whether or not they are PEEC members.  
    For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • Come to Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 7 p.m. Oct. 10 to hear about the Biological Resource Management Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Chuck Hathcock will talk about the lab’s compliance with environmental laws and the plan to protect sensitive species found on lab property.
    The biological resource management teams at LANL assess the status of a variety of organisms on LANL property, including some with threatened or endangered statuses.  
    The team then reports back about how to best manage the biological resources involved.  They have surveyed many different species, including the Jemez Mountain salamander, Rio Grande chub and numerous bird and bat species. LANL scientists often call upon the biology division at the lab to give advice on proposed plans that may pose a threat to the local flora and fauna.
    Hathcock is a wildlife biologist at LANL with more than 15 years of experience in the field. Hathcock and his colleagues have documented many important reports on the biology found in and around LANL.
    His research focuses primarily on songbird population demographics. Outside of work, Hathcock is an avid naturalist and hiker and can be found most weekends birding, bird banding or traveling.  

  • Paul Bauer presents a geo-photo-journey down the northern Rio Grande, emphasizing the river hydrogeology and the evolution of the sublime landscape, during his presentation, “Down the Rio Grande: A Paddler’s Perspective of Rocks and Rapids,” at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 9 at Fuller Lodge.
    The talk is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2012-2013 lecture series, “History and Science.”
    Bauer shares his thoughts on the birth and adolescence of the river, where it gets its water and its system of springs.
    He explores the geologic setting of rapids along the river, the Tertiary battles between water and lava, and tidbits of riverside human history as diverse as gold mining and astronaut training.
    Bauer is a principal geologist and associate director at the New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources at New Mexico Tech.
    He received a doctorate in geology from New Mexico Tech in 1988.
    He served as manager of the state’s Geologic Mapping Program for 12 years, and was program coordinator for the New Mexico Decision-Makers Field Conferences for 10 years, a program designed to bridge the gap between earth scientists and policy makers.  
    He has spent much of the last 30 years investigating the geology and hydrogeology of north-central New Mexico.

  • Familiar tunes, percussive street sounds, cowboy music of the Wild West and soaring melodies —  these will be part of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Fall Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.  
    In his second year as music director for LASO, conductor Dr. Ivan Shulman will lead the orchestra in a concert tour.
    The Brahms “Academic Festival Overture” will open the concert. Composed as a thank you note to the University of Breslau, after receiving an honorary doctorate, Brahms included a variety of college drinking songs. Always the curmudgeonly joker, these appear loose and episodic — in a sort of “tongue in cheek” structure.
    Violinist Roberta Arruda, originally from Brazil, will solo in the Saint-Saens Violin Concerto No. 3. Saint-Saens has been described as the “compleat Frenchman” — accomplished pianist, organist, prolific author on many subjects, linguist, raconteur and world traveler.
     “I produce music like an apple tree produces apples,” Saint-Saens said. His third violin concerto is one of his most popular works.

  • When the phrase “Needles and Pins” is muttered, it sometimes brings to mind the old saying about waiting on needles and pins. It also can bring to mind the Ramones punk rock song of the same name. But on Friday, it will also be associated with art.
    “Needles and Pins” opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The exhibit is part of the Arts Crawl, which will include events at Mesa Public Library, the Los Alamos Historical Museum and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    Artists’ interpretations of a subject are as varied as the pieces they create. This show challenged artists to think outside the box and present their views of needles and pins. The results might be surprising.
    In a state well known for fibers arts and artists, it shouldn’t be surprising that there were myriad entries. However, the show is about more than creating clothing and quilts  — though there are some pieces included. Everything from a pin dome by Los Alamos artist Darla Graff, to  K.C. Coe’s “Ashley Pond Basket” will be on display.

  • Franz Schubert, according to Biography.com, only had one public concert in his life. But thanks to Juanita Madland, Claudia Hilko, Susan Mendel and Alicia Solomon, he will be given a second.
    The group of musicians will host a benefit concert to the Los Alamos Arts Council at 4 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge. The concert is a tribute to the composer and is titled, “Schubertiad.”
    Despite the fact that Schubert died in 1828, his music and the era he lived in will come to life during the concert. To accomplish this, the performers will wear period dresses to portray an actual Schubert Party, will perform as though Schubert was present and will transport the audience back in time to 1797-1828.
    Schubert’s life was short, but he wrote 1,200 pieces in his life of 31 years. Weekly, his friends gathered with him to play the music he wrote during that week. Schubert hardly ever performed as he was so busy churning out music.
    He said, “I wake up, I work on a composition until I am through with it, then I start another. That is what I do all day.”
    “His ‘spirit’ will be with us as we converse with him about his singing Lieder and piano compositions,” Madland said. This is the first of three Schubertiads. The audience is invited to talk with the performers over refreshments.

  • The Los Alamos High School NJROTC Unarmed Drill team opened up the season this year by taking third place at the Early Bird Invitational last week at Valley High School in Albuquerque. Eighteen schools competed at this event from across the state and included JROTC units from every military branch.
    The Los Alamos High School team consisted of nine girls including cadets: Rachel Barthell, Kayla Benson, Karina Bequet-Stidham, Casandra Brewer-Houlton, Tristan Graham, Victoria Hypes, Gianna Maggiore, Mikyla Smith and Jodi Thomas. Analicia Ronquillo, whose command voice earned the title “Best Unarmed Commander” in the Commanders Cup division, commanded the nine girls. The armed team and three color guards finished with an average of fourth place, with the unit as whole finishing third. The next test for all of the teams takes place  Oct. 26 and 27, when they travel to the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell.

  • Today
    Girls in grades K-12, who are interested in Girl Scouts are invited to an information session and registration event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    The Los Alamos High School Band Boosters will host a “No Cook Noodle Night” from 5-7 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill’s Kelly Hall. For more information or to purchase tickets in advance, call Maire O’Neill at 412-8739.

    Glass recycling is finally here and Tom Nagawiecki will present the county’s plans for the recycled glass at 7 p.m. in the upstairs meeting rooms of Mesa Public Library during the Sierra Club meeting.
    Thursday
    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

    The Reel Deal Theater will bring back “The Big Year” for a one-time showing at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children at the door. Proceeds benefit PEEC. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or send email to Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “Hugo,” at 6:30 p.m.