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Today's Features

  • Familiar tunes, percussive street sounds, cowboy music of the Wild West and soaring melodies —  these will be part of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Fall Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.  
    In his second year as music director for LASO, conductor Dr. Ivan Shulman will lead the orchestra in a concert tour.
    The Brahms “Academic Festival Overture” will open the concert. Composed as a thank you note to the University of Breslau, after receiving an honorary doctorate, Brahms included a variety of college drinking songs. Always the curmudgeonly joker, these appear loose and episodic — in a sort of “tongue in cheek” structure.
    Violinist Roberta Arruda, originally from Brazil, will solo in the Saint-Saens Violin Concerto No. 3. Saint-Saens has been described as the “compleat Frenchman” — accomplished pianist, organist, prolific author on many subjects, linguist, raconteur and world traveler.
     “I produce music like an apple tree produces apples,” Saint-Saens said. His third violin concerto is one of his most popular works.

  • When the phrase “Needles and Pins” is muttered, it sometimes brings to mind the old saying about waiting on needles and pins. It also can bring to mind the Ramones punk rock song of the same name. But on Friday, it will also be associated with art.
    “Needles and Pins” opens with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Friday. The exhibit is part of the Arts Crawl, which will include events at Mesa Public Library, the Los Alamos Historical Museum and Karen Wray Fine Art.
    Artists’ interpretations of a subject are as varied as the pieces they create. This show challenged artists to think outside the box and present their views of needles and pins. The results might be surprising.
    In a state well known for fibers arts and artists, it shouldn’t be surprising that there were myriad entries. However, the show is about more than creating clothing and quilts  — though there are some pieces included. Everything from a pin dome by Los Alamos artist Darla Graff, to  K.C. Coe’s “Ashley Pond Basket” will be on display.

  • Franz Schubert, according to Biography.com, only had one public concert in his life. But thanks to Juanita Madland, Claudia Hilko, Susan Mendel and Alicia Solomon, he will be given a second.
    The group of musicians will host a benefit concert to the Los Alamos Arts Council at 4 p.m. Sunday at Fuller Lodge. The concert is a tribute to the composer and is titled, “Schubertiad.”
    Despite the fact that Schubert died in 1828, his music and the era he lived in will come to life during the concert. To accomplish this, the performers will wear period dresses to portray an actual Schubert Party, will perform as though Schubert was present and will transport the audience back in time to 1797-1828.
    Schubert’s life was short, but he wrote 1,200 pieces in his life of 31 years. Weekly, his friends gathered with him to play the music he wrote during that week. Schubert hardly ever performed as he was so busy churning out music.
    He said, “I wake up, I work on a composition until I am through with it, then I start another. That is what I do all day.”
    “His ‘spirit’ will be with us as we converse with him about his singing Lieder and piano compositions,” Madland said. This is the first of three Schubertiads. The audience is invited to talk with the performers over refreshments.

  • The Los Alamos High School NJROTC Unarmed Drill team opened up the season this year by taking third place at the Early Bird Invitational last week at Valley High School in Albuquerque. Eighteen schools competed at this event from across the state and included JROTC units from every military branch.
    The Los Alamos High School team consisted of nine girls including cadets: Rachel Barthell, Kayla Benson, Karina Bequet-Stidham, Casandra Brewer-Houlton, Tristan Graham, Victoria Hypes, Gianna Maggiore, Mikyla Smith and Jodi Thomas. Analicia Ronquillo, whose command voice earned the title “Best Unarmed Commander” in the Commanders Cup division, commanded the nine girls. The armed team and three color guards finished with an average of fourth place, with the unit as whole finishing third. The next test for all of the teams takes place  Oct. 26 and 27, when they travel to the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell.

  • Today
    Girls in grades K-12, who are interested in Girl Scouts are invited to an information session and registration event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    The Los Alamos High School Band Boosters will host a “No Cook Noodle Night” from 5-7 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill’s Kelly Hall. For more information or to purchase tickets in advance, call Maire O’Neill at 412-8739.

    Glass recycling is finally here and Tom Nagawiecki will present the county’s plans for the recycled glass at 7 p.m. in the upstairs meeting rooms of Mesa Public Library during the Sierra Club meeting.
    Thursday
    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

    The Reel Deal Theater will bring back “The Big Year” for a one-time showing at 6 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children at the door. Proceeds benefit PEEC. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460 or send email to Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “Hugo,” at 6:30 p.m.

  • Recurring meetings

     

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

     

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursdays. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

     

  • Wednesday

    The Los Alamos Arts Council presents Brave New Brass, a new ensemble, based on brass quintets organized by Dave and Deneice Korzekwa. The Brown Bag event will be at noon at Fuller Lodge.

     

    Girls in grade K-12, who are interested in Girl Scouts are invited to an information session and registration event from 4-5:30 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. For more information, email su22@losalamos@gmail.com. 

     

  • Public Access Channel 8 will present “Democracy Now!” host Amy Goodman with co-author of “The Silenced Majority,” Denis Moynihan, Oct. 11 at Fuller Lodge. 

    Award-winning journalist Amy Goodman, anchor of the daily, grassroots, global, radio/TV news hour “Democracy Now!” is on a two-month, 100 city tour holding public events to help raise funds for the public broadcasters that carry “Democracy Now!”  

    She will give a public talk from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Otowi Station Bookstore will host a book signing of  “The Silenced Majority,” following the event at Fuller Lodge. 

    The price of the book is not included in luncheon cost. 

  • Welcome to October and the asset category of support.

    This category encompasses assets one through six and includes: family support, positive family communication, other adult relationships, caring neighborhood, caring school climate and parent involvement in schooling.

    Our first two areas of focus are numbers one and two, family support and positive family communication.

    I would like to draw attention to adult responsibility when it comes to being supportive and having positive communication with youth.

    Do you reap what you sow? I know several adults who don’t hesitate to bash their children on social media and to friends, even when kids are within earshot.

  • It's a medical nightmare: a 24-year-old man endures 350 surgeries since childhood to remove growths that keep coming back in his throat and have spread to his lungs, threatening his life. Now doctors have found a way to help him by way of a scientific coup that holds promise for millions of cancer patients.

    The bizarre case is the first use in a patient of a new discovery: how to keep ordinary and cancerous cells alive indefinitely in the lab.

    The discovery allows doctors to grow "mini tumors" from each patient's cancer in a lab dish, then test various drugs or combinations on them to see which works best. It takes only a few cells from a biopsy and less than two weeks to do, with materials and methods common in most hospitals.

    Although the approach needs much more testing against many different types of cancer, researchers think it could offer a cheap, simple way to personalize treatment without having to analyze each patient's genes.