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Today's Features

  • Los Alamos Medical Center reported the following births:

    Sept. 18: A girl, Ruth Eleanor Partin, born to Kristen and Ben Partin
    Sept. 22: A girl, Cadence Ellise Towles, born to Valerie Lopez and LeRoy D. Towles
    Sept. 26: A boy, Makaleb Le’roi Herrera, born to Natalie Theresa Herrera
    Oct. 4: A girl, Yalexa Elena Perea, born to Maria and Francisco Perea

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • Is Orthodoxy “religious” or “spiritual?”

    Part 3
    It is frequently implied in modernity that it is preferential to be spiritual as opposed to religious.
    Religion at face value appears to be juridical, following of rules and dogmas. At least, in Orthodoxy, what is believed to be “religious” is actually a way of life springing from love, not from rules or legalism.
    Is going to the bathroom or eating or breathing or blinking religious merely because one must do so? No.
    One must do these things to survive. For Orthodox, survival is not so much the motivator as is love for an actual person.
    Spirituality has been equated with absolute freedom. One could ask if the most common understanding of “spirituality” is: dedication to the “free spirit.”
    One can observe that this has in fact become a fad or dogmatic. Essentially, anything that is specific, absolute, or divisive is considered material; anything that promotes generalities, peace and unity, is considered good, like a spiritual law, since it supposedly rises above negativity.
    Any absolute concepts equate to material; inclusivity becomes spiritual. Out of these sentiments, and others like them, come the dogma: “focus on similarities and ignore differences.”

  • Is Orthodoxy “religious” or “spiritual?”

    Part 3
    It is frequently implied in modernity that it is preferential to be spiritual as opposed to religious.
    Religion at face value appears to be juridical, following of rules and dogmas. At least, in Orthodoxy, what is believed to be “religious” is actually a way of life springing from love, not from rules or legalism.
    Is going to the bathroom or eating or breathing or blinking religious merely because one must do so? No.
    One must do these things to survive. For Orthodox, survival is not so much the motivator as is love for an actual person.
    Spirituality has been equated with absolute freedom. One could ask if the most common understanding of “spirituality” is: dedication to the “free spirit.”
    One can observe that this has in fact become a fad or dogmatic. Essentially, anything that is specific, absolute, or divisive is considered material; anything that promotes generalities, peace and unity, is considered good, like a spiritual law, since it supposedly rises above negativity.
    Any absolute concepts equate to material; inclusivity becomes spiritual. Out of these sentiments, and others like them, come the dogma: “focus on similarities and ignore differences.”

  • The display case at Mesa Public Library will feature embroidered artwork stitched by members of the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, through Oct. 26. The EGA is a national educational organization dedicated to promoting and preserving needle arts. There are a number of different types of needlework in the display.
    The local chapter meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in Gibson Fellowship Hall of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each meeting features a program on a stitching technique or project. During the past year the group has explored stump work (three-dimensional embroidery), chicken scratch or gingham embroidery, crazy quilting, New Mexican colcha embroidery and Kumihimo (Japanese braiding.)
    Between 10 a.m. and noon Oct. 20, members of Pajarito Chapter will be in the lobby of Mesa Public Library to demonstrate various embroidery techniques. Watch the stitchers at work. They’ll explain the various techniques and answer questions. For more information call Marilyn at 672-9404.

     

  • Art tours

    The 25th Annual Galisteo Studio Tour will be from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. For more information, visit galistostudiotour.org or call 466-2121.

    Dance

    Ballet Folklorico de Mexico will perform at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Lensic Performing Arts Center. For ticket prices and more information, visit ticketssantafe.org.
    Exhibits

    The United States Flag Act of 1818 set forth a rule that no new stars could be added to Old Glory until the Fourth of July immediately following a state’s admission to the union. Thanks to that once-a-year-and-only-once-a-year mandate, New Mexicans hoping to share their pride at becoming the 47th state were essentially forced into committing their first illegal acts as U.S. citizens. Through Nov. 25, the New Mexico History Museum commemorates that dip into the dark side with “47 Stars,” an exhibit of the officially unofficial 47-star flag. For more information, call 476-5200.
    Film

    The Santa Fe Independent Film Festival kicks off with the New Mexico premier of “Bless Me Ultima,” based on the novel by Rudolfo Anaya. The festival runs through Sunday and will also feature “Tiger Eyes,” by Judy Blume. For more information and tickets, visit santafeiff.com.
    Miscellaneous

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center at 9:10 a.m. Oct. 27 for a hike across Beanfield Mesa. Living Treasure, author and local historian Dorothy Hoard will lead participants around the mesa top, past historic locations and to viewpoints.
    Prior to 1943, two old roads were built to access a farm high atop Beanfield Mesa.  Located across Rendija Canyon, north of Barranca Mesa, the mesa featured a substantial line cabin (lost in the 2000 Cerro Grande fire).  
    Those farmers tended crops on Beanfield Mesa, but the history of the mesa also includes sheep, cattle and logging. During the hike, Hoard will talk about this historic location and the importance of Veronica Springs, a welcome sight in dry times that probably fed a sawmill at one point.
    This hike will loop around the mesa to include both roads and also check out two game pits — one probably real, the other suspicious. This is a moderate hike.
    Some stretches are very rocky, though not particularly steep. Some parts of the route have no established trail.
    Come experience the views and a historic area of Los Alamos. Meet at PEEC at 9:10 a.m. to carpool or at the trailhead at 9:30 a.m. Bring water and sunscreen. Free, no registration required.

  • Margaret Wood will share stories and memories of her time with Georgia O’Keeffe as part of the Authors Speak Series at 7 p.m. Oct. 25 in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.
    In 1977, Wood  began a five-year stay as companion and caretaker to then 89-year-old Georgia O’Keeffe.
    There were no sign posts in the village in those years and few markers for a young woman managing the complex role as companion to a woman of O’Keeffe’s stature, who nonetheless was now dependent on others to maintain the independent life she had cultivated.                        
    Growing and preparing food was one of O’Keeffe’s greatest pleasures, with the artist mentoring her young caregiver on the art of gardening and cooking. Wood and O’Keeffe often walked the red hills of Ghost Ranch in early evenings.
    The artist had a reputation of living a secluded life, but in fact enjoyed welcoming a host of visitors to her home. Wood shares anecdotes about these social exchanges, along with a treasure trove of stories              intimately shared in her new book, “Remembering Miss O’Keeffe: Stories from Abiquiu.”

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, October 19, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (10-02-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Education is Hope
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Geology of the Rio Grande”
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, October 20, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, October 21, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, October 22, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Elizabeth Clare Prophet
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM League of Women Voters Candidate Forum  10-04-12
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Education is Hope
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • Group auditions for Van Choc Straw will be at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 4 and 5 in the Green Room of the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.
    Scripts are available at the Reference Desk of the Mesa Public Library.
    Anyone who wishes to have a private audition rather than attend the group audition should contact John Gustafson at johngus@cybermesa.com or at 412-3235.
    Callbacks, if necessary, will be at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6.
    “VanChocStraw” (think Neopolitan ice cream), an unpublished play by Albuquerque-based playwright Mark Dunn, will be produced at Los Alamos Little Theatre in March 2013, and will be LALT’s entry into the AACTFest competition to be hosted at LALT, also in March.
    Mimi Adams is the director and Gustafson the producer. Anyone interested in helping with crew for this show is also invited to let them know of your interest. Casting will be for four women and one man.
    Characters in order of appearance
    • Althea Witlin, female, mid- to late-70s
    • Leif Morrell, male, 33
    • Mattie Pleshette, female, mid-20s to early 30s
    • Connie Morrell, female, 31
    • Ina Gluck, female, mid-70s
    This is a comedy/drama. Althea Witlin has one jigsaw puzzle among her large collection that she’s never worked.