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Today's Features

  • Douglas and Ruth Helmick Lier

    Doug and Ruth Lier are both of Scandinavian descent and perhaps that partially explains how they fit together so well. Doug notes his heritage is Norwegian and Danish, and Ruth descends from “Viking kings.” Maybe that bond also fires the apparently boundless energy and interests they share and pour into the community — much to the betterment of Los Alamos for the past 60 years.
    Green Bay, Wis. was home to Doug until he left to attend St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn., where he earned his bachelor’s degree in physics.  Following graduation, he joined the Navy’s Officer Candidate School. Due to his background in physics and math, Doug was sent to Sandia Base in Albuquerque for training as a nuclear supervisor. He served out the remainder of the Korean War in the far East as a nuclear supervisor aboard Navy carriers.
    He later joined the Los Alamos Laboratory as a joint task force member, then as a lab staff member in J and P divisions, and ended his 36-year lab career in the directors’ office.
    Ruth Helmick Lier grew up in Des Moines, Iowa and at 22, was happily completing her master’s degree in microbiology when she learned the Los Alamos school system was seeking a science teacher.

  • PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Thirty-five years after leaving Earth, Voyager 1 is reaching for the stars.

    Sooner or later, the workhorse spacecraft will bid adieu to the solar system and enter a new realm of space — the first time a manmade object will have escaped to the other side.

    Perhaps no one on Earth will relish the moment more than 76-year-old Ed Stone, who has toiled on the project from the start.

    "We're anxious to get outside and find what's out there," he said.

    When NASA's Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 first rocketed out of Earth's grip in 1977, no one knew how long they would live. Now, they are the longest-operating spacecraft in history and the most distant, at billions of miles from Earth but in different directions.

    Wednesday marks the 35th anniversary of Voyager 1's launch to Jupiter and Saturn. It is now flitting around the fringes of the solar system, which is enveloped in a giant plasma bubble. This hot and turbulent area is created by a stream of charged particles from the sun.

    Outside the bubble is a new frontier in the Milky Way — the space between stars. Once it plows through, scientists expect a calmer environment by comparison.

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Michael Clarke Duncan, the hulking, prolific character actor whose dozens of films included an Oscar-nominated performance as a death row inmate in "The Green Mile" and such other box office hits as "Armageddon," ''Planet of the Apes" and "Kung Fu Panda," is dead at age 54.

    Clarke died Monday morning at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he was being treated for a heart attack, said his fiancée, reality TV personality Rev. Omarosa Manigault, in a statement released by publicist Joy Fehily.

    The muscular, 6-foot-4 (1.96 meter) Duncan, a former bodyguard who turned to acting in his 30s, "suffered a myocardial infarction on July 13 and never fully recovered," the statement said. "Manigault is grateful for all of your prayers and asks for privacy at this time. Celebrations of his life, both private and public, will be announced at a later date."

  • Register middle school or high school students for STEM Student Day from 4-7 p.m. Sept. 14.
    Everyone starts off at the Little Theater at 4 p.m. with a character performance of Madame Curie. Then at 5 p.m., walk over to the Bradbury Science Museum and have pizza and attend a program of the students’ choice (required at time of registration). Students choose from: Kraz-E-Science show; Mars-Rover program; or Fire Science program. All programs are limited in size. There will also be an iPad giveaway followed by seeing a domonstration of the Procter & Gamble Corvette with jet engine in the parking lot across the street.
    Register at chamberorganizer.com/members/evr/reg_event.
    The last Los Alamos County Summer Concer Series event of the season will be at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond, featuring Stephanie Hatfield.
    From 11 a.m.-3 p.m.  Sept. 15, The Next Big Idea Festival will be at Fuller Lodge. There will be entertainment planned and food. Kids of all ages, as well as other venues about town such as the Bradbury Science Museum, Recycled Fashion Show down MainStreet, Mesa Pubic Library and parking lot and Central Park Square’s Beer garden at The Park or green area. Go to nextbigideala.com for more information.

  • Benjamin Batha, a junior majoring in computer science at the University of Rochester, has been named to the dean’s list for academic achievement for the spring 2012 semester.
    Batha, a resident of Los Alamos, is the son of Margo and Steven Batha, and a graduate of Los Alamos High School.
    The University of Rochester, founded in 1850, is a private research university located in Rochester, N.Y., (pop. 212,000) on the south shore of Lake Ontario.
    The University offers an undergraduate curriculum, with no required courses, that emphasizes a broad liberal education through majors, minors, and course “clusters”—a Rochester innovation—in the three main areas of knowledge: humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences/engineering.

  • The Los Alamos Medical Center reported the following births:

    • Aug. 14: A boy, Jeremiah Shine Brake, born to Rita and Mike Brake
    • Aug. 20: A boy, Leeum Josiah Riddick, born to Letisha L. Trujillo and Charlie R. Riddick
    • Aug. 21: A boy, William Michael Wheat, born to Angela and William Wheat
    • Aug. 25: A girl, Selena Veronica Truman, born to Maria and Edward Truman

  • Take a lunch break at the free Brown Bag Performance series in Fuller Lodge at noon, the first Wednesdy of every month.   On Wednesday, Dr. Marcos Cavalcante will present a diverse program including works of Villa-Lobos, Antonio Lauro and Turina. Cavacante is a tenured associate professor at Northern New Mexico College and has Marcos Cavacante’s Guitar Studio in Los Alamos. He has a doctorate in music, classical guitar literature and performance at Indiana University Bloomington.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.

    DOGS
    Coqueta — Six-year-old spayed female Retriever/Chow-mix surrendered. Good with adults and gentle children. Has been an outdoor dog.
    Ellie — Adult spayed female black Shepherd-mix. Friendly, well-socialized, fine with other dogs.
    Five Border Collie puppies— Four-months-old, four males and one female. They are pretty shy and the volunteers are working on socialization. Keep watching as they develop into fun, approachable pups.
    Naney — Senior brown-and-white English Hound-mix. Owner going abroad. Needs a quiet retirement home. Has reasonable doggy manners. Would be a nice, calm companion in a quiet home.  Will have some tumors removed and a good dental next week.