.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Today
    The United Blood Services New Mexico will host a community blood drive from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 2200 Diamond Dr.

    The Sierrans will host a highway clean-up event along their stretch of N.M. 4 at the Valles Caldera. Meet at Ponderosa Campground at 5 p.m. to carpool. It should take no more than two hours. Bring work gloves and water. Trash bags will be provided. For more information, contact Dave Gemeinhart, 672-6267.

    Join the Parent Raising Teen Club from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop. Share your worries and find like-minded parents that can offer support. The group will meet each Thursday evening through Nov. 29. For more information, call Elizabeth Grant at 660-5796.

    Poetry gatherings at 6:30 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda of Mesa Public Library.

    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will hold its monthly meeting at 7 p.m. in room three of the Mesa Public Library. The program will be a presentation by Dr. William Litchman, a professional genealogist from Albuquerque, titled, “Church Records and Their Use in Genealogical Research.” The public is invited.

  • Jed Williamson knows how people get in trouble in the mountains. He has been the chair of the Safety Advisory Council and the editor of the American Alpine Club’s annual report, Accidents in North American Mountaineering, since 1974.  
    At 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17 at Fuller Lodge, Williamson will present an overview of his knowledge of moving through the mountains with other people, what works and what goes wrong.
    His presentation will include detailed analysis of the many factors that add up to an accident, not just weather and terrain, but human fallibility in behaviors and judgment.
    Through his knowledge, he will teach the facts and give some perspective on how to take risks and maximize the possibility of safe passage at the same time. His talk will cover trends and patterns in mountaineering and wilderness accidents and analysis of some classic accidents.
    Williamson has been a practitioner and consultant in education and outdoor pursuits, including more than 60 safety and quality reviews and accident investigations and 16 accreditation reviews.
    He was a member of the Board of the American Alpine Club from 1974 to 1998 and elected as an honorary member in 2007.

  • The display case at Mesa Public Library will feature embroidered artwork stitched by members of the Pajarito Chapter of the Embroiderers’ Guild of America, through Oct. 26. The EGA is a national educational organization dedicated to promoting and preserving needle arts. There are a number of different types of needlework in the display.
    The local chapter meets on the first Monday of the month at 7 p.m. in Gibson Fellowship Hall of Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each meeting features a program on a stitching technique or project. During the past year the group has explored stump work (three-dimensional embroidery), chicken scratch or gingham embroidery, crazy quilting, New Mexican colcha embroidery and Kumihimo (Japanese braiding.)
    Between 10 a.m. and noon Oct. 20, members of Pajarito Chapter will be in the lobby of Mesa Public Library to demonstrate various embroidery techniques. Watch the stitchers at work. They’ll explain the various techniques and answer questions. For more information call Marilyn at 672-9404.

     

  • Natali Steinberg, docent of the Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve, is offering her guided tour leaving from Pajarito Environmental Education Center at noon.  
    This small preserve, located near Rancho de las Golondrinas just south of Santa Fe, has several ecological niches, ranging from scrub desert to the lush vegetation of the cienega (Spanish for “marsh”).  
    This range supports a wide diversity of plant and animal life.  Three trails, one of which is handicap-accessible, lead walkers through these areas, including open meadows, shady cottonwoods and a pond bordered by cattails.
    On this visit, expect to see bullfrogs and maybe some tadpoles, as well as a Bewick’s wren nesting in the donation box, Red Wing Blackbirds nesting in the cattails and possibly some Mallards or Coots.
    PEEC welcomes all who wish to join this field trip. Meet at PEEC, 3540 Orange St., to carpool or caravan to the Preserve.
    Bring good walking shoes, lunch and water. The trip is free, but contact PEEC by calling 662-0460 or register on their website so they will know whom to expect.
    White Rock people could meet at the Y if they wish. The trip will last approximately four hours (one hour driving each way, two hours at the Preserve).
    For more information on the preserve, go to  santafebotanicalgarden.org.

  • Come to PEEC from 7 – 8 p.m. to Hear how the Las Conchas fire affected the Valles Caldera National Preserve from Rebecca Oertel, a forest and range plant ecologist at the VCNP, from 7-8 p.m. Oct. 16.
    Oertel grew up in Los Alamos, obtained a degree in biochemistry and has worked in the Jemez Mountains Area for the past 18 years as a biologist.  
    Although Oertel has been at the VCNP for one year, her extensive experience in the Jemez Mountains includes 11 years as a biologist at Bandelier National Monument, nine of which were with the U.S. Geological Society under Dr. Craig Allen at the Jemez Mountain Field Station.  
    There, she performed scientific research in long-term ecological monitoring including botany, ecohydrology, tree demography and dendrochronology.  
    In addition, her checkered background includes biochemical cancer research, EPA Superfund cleanup, LANL environmental monitoring, radioactive materials handling and disposal and a Helitack wildland firefighter in Santa Fe National Forest.
    This presentation will include photographs and a discussion of Las Conchas Fire effects on the VCNP and possible short-term ecological outcomes in the Jemez Mountains.  

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, August 12, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – LIVE!
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay (8-02-11)
    03:00 PM JR Oppenheimer Lecture – Paul Nurse – “Great Ideas of Biology
    04:30 PM The House of Yahwah
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society-“Stories from the Secret City of Oak Ridge”
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Pure Mind
    09:00 PM UCTV

    Saturday, Aug. 13, 2011
    5:00 UCTV

    Sunday, Aug. 14, 2011
    06:00 AM UCTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, August 15, 2011
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Spirituality Today
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Elizabeth Clare Prophet
    01:30 PM Living Treasures Ceremony
    03:30 PM The David Pakman Show
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Don Quixote Vanilla, 236 Rio Bravo
    Date inspected: Oct. 3
    Violations: One low-risk violation for poor personal hygiene — must wear hair restraints.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    El Rigoberto’s Taco Shop, 166 Central Park Square
    Date inspected: Oct. 3, opening
    Violations: One moderate-risk violation for contaminated equipment — seal around walk-in refrigerator may need replacing. Two low-risk violations for floors/walls/ceilings — ceiling panel missing, will put in today; self-closing devices for men’s restroom needed.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Elk’s Lodge, 1601 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 4, follow-up
    Violations: Two high-risk violations for contaminated equipment — scoop for ice was laying on top of ice machine. Corrected. Placed in container after washing it; sanitizer > 200 ppm. Corrected.  
    Notes: Thermometer read 142 degrees on green chile. Inspector’s thermometer read 147 degrees. All food handlers must wear caps and gloves.

  • Art as therapy is not uncommon. It’s a way to release pent-up feelings, but can also breathe new life into the artist and give that person a way to express his feelings.
    For Santa Fe artist Marck Romero, art has provided a way for him to release his inner feelings and has given him a new lease on life.
    As a recovering addict, Romero found his inner artist while in jail. Clean for three years, art came from sobriety. “It’s always something I wanted to do, but never did it,” he said. He said he got clean, reconnected with his spirit and was able to do art.
    Romero is no stranger to the creative process, however. He used to be a tattoo artist and is a guitarist and vocalist in XMortis, a heavy metal/thrash band. He’s also pursuing a degree in drug and alcohol abuse counseling and is scheduled to graduate from Santa Fe Community College next year.
    “Getting clean did so much for me,” he said.
    Romero said drawing is a favorite thing for him to do, but the art he’s been creating recently isn’t just about drawing. It’s about bringing his creations to life by putting paint on wood. But if you’re thinking retablo-style work, think again. Romero’s creations are dark and 3D.

  • Finding a decent Northern New Mexican meal isn’t hard if you’re willing to take a short drive.
    There are plenty of places in Santa Fe that offer traditional New Mexican fare. There are also a few places in Española where you can get a meal reminiscent of those grandma used to make; La Cocina is one of those places. Just to be clear, we’re talking about the location at 415 Santa Clara Bridge Road, not Steve’s La Cocina, behind the fueling station on Los Alamos Highway.
    A recent trip to La Cocina proved to be satisfying and did not cause sticker shock when the bill came. The worst part of the experience was trying to decide on what to order. There is quite a variety to choose from. They offer everything from American comfort food like chicken fried steak and mashed potatoes, to burgers and sandwiches. But one doesn’t go to a Northern New Mexican restaurant for a hamburger (though they are probably pretty good). No,  one goes there for either a red or green chile fix.
    Enchiladas, burritos, tostadas and more grace the pages of the menu, each one tempting the diner to try something they don’t usually order.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre will present Pasión de Tango with the Cuarteto Alejandro Ziegler touring the American Southwest for the first time, at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18.  
    Ziegler (piano), Ignacio Quiroz (violin), Javier Stromann (bandoneón), Ariel Obregón (double bass) hail from Buenos Aires, Argentina, where they developed their own contemporary tango style based on the music of Julián Plaza, Alfredo Gobbi, Horacio Salgán, Aníbal Troilo, Osvaldo Pugliese and Astor Piazzolla.  
    Zielger was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He graduated from UCA Music University in composition and orchestral conducting. As a pianist, he joined the Buenos Aires City Orchestra (Orquesta Escuela de Tango). There he performed for over two years under conductors Emilio Balcarce and Nestor Marconi.