.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Having to buy a bra, wearing deodorant, having to shave and getting a period, are only a few of the changes that girls go through when they first enter puberty. When girls can talk openly with a woman they trust, these changes will be much less frightening.
    From 5:30-8 p.m. April 11, Family Strengths Network will host “Tweens to Teens,” a workshop for 9-13-year-old girls and their mothers or other female adults.
    The program gives girls a chance to talk about the physical and emotional changes that come with puberty, in a safe environment. They are given complete, accurate information so they know what to expect and how to deal with these changes.

  • Wednesday
    The National Private Duty Association will offer A Web conference to help families in New Mexico facing hiring a caregiver for a family member, at 7 p.m.. The live and interactive program, which will provide advice on reducing risks during the home care hiring process, is free of charge to participants. Pre-registration for the event is required. Sign up by visiting the registration link at www.privateduty
    homecare.org.

    Saturday

  • March on Hunger
    Aspen, Chamisa and Mountain elementaries, along with Los Alamos Middle School, are collecting non-perishable items for people and collars and leashes for pets as a community project and a student service project combine their efforts. To learn more about making donations call 661-4846. Donations are accepted at school locations through Friday. The Los Alamos Monitor, KRSN AM 1490 and the Betty Ehart Senior Center continue the March on Hunger through the end of the month.

    A day in the life of a teen

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center, Mesa Public Library and Los Alamos Public Schools elementary art teachers have joined together to put on a show to celebrate Earth Day and National Library Week.
    The title of the show is “Growing Green, Treasures of the Earth.”  The opening will be from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on April 7, but the show will be available for viewing ]March 28-April 26.
    Artists are displaying their visions of treasures of the earth through a variety of media in the upstairs gallery of the library.  Photography, pastels, collage, watercolor and fabric are just a few of the offerings.

  • March 27-April 2, 2011
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:30 a.m.    Tax preparation
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    9:30 a.m.    Spanish lesson
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Orange chicken
    1 p.m.        Bridge
    1:30 p.m.    Pilates
    7 p.m.         Ballroom dancing

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on-site adoptable pets; others are in foster care with loving, temporary homes.
    All of our fully reconditioned adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro-chipped.
    Be sure to check out links to our many pets at the Friends of the Shelter Web site: www.lafos.org. You can also volunteer or make a donation.  
    Don’t forget our two-for-one, $35 Cat-a-Palooza adoption event is still going on for a limited time. The Dog Jog is coming up April 16, so mark you calendars and register online.

    Cats

  • Los Alamos Light Opera is holding auditions for its October/November 2011 production of Steven Sondheim’s, “Into the Woods.” The director is Laurie Tomlinson; Gretchen Amstutz is the musical director and will direct the orchestra. Rehearsals will begin in July.
    Auditions are 1-6 p.m. April 10, and 6:30-9 p.m. April 11 in the Duane Smith Auditorium. Potential cast members are asked to come prepared to sing a solo. It does not have to be a selection from “Into the Woods.” A pre-audition music workshop will be from 3-6 p.m. April 3 at the Unitarian Church. Everyone interested in auditioning is urged to attend.

  • Aside from the staples such as diapers, bottles, blankets and clothes, one of the first items that parents buy for their newborn is a book of nursery rhymes. It’s a way to bond with their baby, while exposing them at a very young age, to the literary world.
    The Literacy Committee for the Rotary Club of Los Alamos is lending parents a helping hand by supplying babies born at Los Alamos Medical Center with a copy of “Mother Goose Nursery Rhymes,” as part of their “welcome” basket when they leave the hospital. Each book sports a sticker saying that it’s a gift from Rotary.

  • Once again, the Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation’s annual Great Conversations dinner is coming to town. Join a group of tablemates and a speaker at 5:30 p.m. April 10 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center for an informative and fun conversation.
    This is the sixth in a series of articles on the featured speakers. For a complete list of speakers, topics and to print a registration form, visit www.lapsfoundation.com. Tickets are $60 per person and include appetizers, a gourmet meal, wine, dessert and coffee. Registration is open now and is complete when payment is received.

    Nelson Hoffman

    Topic:  Science’s Debt to Religion. Speaking points include:

  • Every ministry has its own way of spreading its message, whether it’s through preaching on Sunday morning, or by hosting community events that the public is invited to attend. One group, however, is taking a different approach to ministering. They do hula dancing.
    The Hula Mai Ka Lani group is a non-denominational christian ministry out of Santa Fe that has been together for about 10 years and is led by their Kumu, or leader, Kalani Hawn. Though the group is based in Santa Fe, families from Rio Rancho, Pojoaque and Los Alamos are members. Michael, Michele, Morgan, Patrick and Dylan Irish are a Los Alamos family that is part of the ministry.