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Today's Features

  • SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — George S. McGovern, a proud liberal who argued fervently against the Vietnam War as a senator from South Dakota and suffered one of the most crushing defeats in presidential election history against Richard Nixon in 1972, died before dawn Sunday. He was 90.

    A spokesman for McGovern's family, Steve Hildebrand, told The Associated Press by telephone that McGovern died peacefully at 5:15 a.m. Sunday at a hospice in Sioux Falls, surrounded by family and lifelong friends. The family had said in a statement late last that McGovern had become unresponsive while under hospice care.

    "We are blessed to know that our father lived a long, successful and productive life advocating for the hungry, being a progressive voice for millions and fighting for peace. He continued giving speeches, writing and advising all the way up to and past his 90th birthday, which he celebrated this summer," a family statement released by Hildebrand said.

    Hildbrand's statement said funeral services would be held in Sioux Falls and that the details would be announced shortly. He did not elaborate.

  • The rumors persist that the old Line Camp building in Pojoaque is haunted. The building has been standing for nearly 100 years and has been host to a variety of businesses. It has served mainly as a tavern, with many locals having fond memories of their visits there.

    Recently, an older gentleman who has been associated with the Line Camp for years shared some of the stories and experiences related to the historical building. Some stories are chilling and some are related to local folklore. However, one thing is certain — the tumultuous history of the place has left a mark on this old wooden building.

    The Tavern Cat
    There once was an old drunkard who practically lived at the tavern. He was a permanent fixture at the bar. After many years of patronage, the old man acquired an illness that kept him away from his beloved tavern. He was bedridden and eventually passed away.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of on site adoptable pets waiting for their forever home.
    Come find a companion that will give you unconditional love. Be sure to visit lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are spayed or neutered, have their shots and are micro chipped. Visitor guides: Between 4-6 p.m. Friday, volunteers will be at the shelter to give potential adopters personal introductions to the adoptable animals.
    DOGS
    Autumn — This spayed female is one of those rare breeds that doesn’t come around very often — a New Mexico Brown Dog. She is housebroken and leash-trained, just don’t try to force her to be friends with any dog smaller than her.
    Axle — Don’t let those sad-looking eyes fool you. Axle is a playful and affectionate neutered male. The shelter temperament testers describe this Pit-mix as a total sweetheart. He would love a family that appreciates big, sloppy dog kisses.
    Bear — Large year-old male Heeler-mix. Housebroken, people oriented. Reported to be good with dogs.
    Ciera — Spayed female Shepherd-cross who likes to get to know her human associates before she shares her story with them.

  • Drop into Pajarito Environmental Education Center between 1-4 p.m. Oct. 31 for a creepy, crawly Halloween.  There will be games, crafts, a spider-hunting walk and from 2-3 p.m., see live creatures from the Harrell House of Natural Oddities.
    Halloween at PEEC will be unlike any other.  Children and adults alike will enjoy getting in the holiday spirit making crafty owls, spiders, bats and more to decorate for the season.  
    And what better way to enjoy the crisp, fall air than a short hike?  Participants will search for spiders on the nature trail and use magnifying glasses to find the smaller critters.  
    Then stay out on the lawn for games like Ghost in the Graveyard, Capture the Ghoul and Spooky Scavenger Hunt.
    The Harrell House of Natural Oddities was the hit of PEEC’s Summer Family Evenings. More than 100 people came to see their fascinating critters, which include tarantulas, scorpions, millipedes, centipedes, giant cockroaches and crabs.
    PEEC has invited the Harrell family back for Halloween, which is the time to take another look at these creepy creatures.  The Harrell House will be open for viewing from 2-3 p.m.

  • Oct. 21-27
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    9 a.m.    Toenail clipping
    9:45 a.m.    Matter of balance class
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Fish (salmon)
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    10 a.m.    Low vision/hearing guest Virginia Murphy
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1:30 p.m.    Friends meeting
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.    Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    RSVP quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken fajita
    1:15 p.m.    Socrates Café
    1:30 p.m.    Daytime duplicate bridge
    THURSDAY

  • Chandra Kluk graduated in May from the University of Colorado Physician Assistant Program with a master’s degree in physician assistant studies.
    The National Commission subsequently certified her for Certification of Physician Assistants in June. Kluk recently accepted a PA-C position with Grand Valley Urgent Care in Grand Junction, Colo.
    She is the daughter of Emily and Mike Kluk of White Rock.

    *****

    Tony Buchen, a Los Alamos native is showing his work at Virtual Artspace in Santa Fe.
    He received his degree, summa cum laude in physics, from the University of New Mexico and did graduate work in Brookhaven, N.Y. In 1980, he began a collaboration with Santa Fe artist Jeralyn Goodwin, which he has continued to date. Working exclusively in cyberspace, they are creating sculptures as 3D models.
    The works at the studio — photos, videos and sculptures — represent three ways of experiencing a virtual object.

  • Los Alamos Medical Center reported the following births:

    Sept. 18: A girl, Ruth Eleanor Partin, born to Kristen and Ben Partin
    Sept. 22: A girl, Cadence Ellise Towles, born to Valerie Lopez and LeRoy D. Towles
    Sept. 26: A boy, Makaleb Le’roi Herrera, born to Natalie Theresa Herrera
    Oct. 4: A girl, Yalexa Elena Perea, born to Maria and Francisco Perea

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • Is Orthodoxy “religious” or “spiritual?”

    Part 3
    It is frequently implied in modernity that it is preferential to be spiritual as opposed to religious.
    Religion at face value appears to be juridical, following of rules and dogmas. At least, in Orthodoxy, what is believed to be “religious” is actually a way of life springing from love, not from rules or legalism.
    Is going to the bathroom or eating or breathing or blinking religious merely because one must do so? No.
    One must do these things to survive. For Orthodox, survival is not so much the motivator as is love for an actual person.
    Spirituality has been equated with absolute freedom. One could ask if the most common understanding of “spirituality” is: dedication to the “free spirit.”
    One can observe that this has in fact become a fad or dogmatic. Essentially, anything that is specific, absolute, or divisive is considered material; anything that promotes generalities, peace and unity, is considered good, like a spiritual law, since it supposedly rises above negativity.
    Any absolute concepts equate to material; inclusivity becomes spiritual. Out of these sentiments, and others like them, come the dogma: “focus on similarities and ignore differences.”

  • Is Orthodoxy “religious” or “spiritual?”

    Part 3
    It is frequently implied in modernity that it is preferential to be spiritual as opposed to religious.
    Religion at face value appears to be juridical, following of rules and dogmas. At least, in Orthodoxy, what is believed to be “religious” is actually a way of life springing from love, not from rules or legalism.
    Is going to the bathroom or eating or breathing or blinking religious merely because one must do so? No.
    One must do these things to survive. For Orthodox, survival is not so much the motivator as is love for an actual person.
    Spirituality has been equated with absolute freedom. One could ask if the most common understanding of “spirituality” is: dedication to the “free spirit.”
    One can observe that this has in fact become a fad or dogmatic. Essentially, anything that is specific, absolute, or divisive is considered material; anything that promotes generalities, peace and unity, is considered good, like a spiritual law, since it supposedly rises above negativity.
    Any absolute concepts equate to material; inclusivity becomes spiritual. Out of these sentiments, and others like them, come the dogma: “focus on similarities and ignore differences.”