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Today's Features

  • PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — More than 2,000 people at Pearl Harbor and many more around the country on Friday marked the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack that killed thousands of people and launched the United States into World War II.

    The USS Michael Murphy, a recently christened ship named after a Pearl Harbor-based Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan, sounded its ship's whistle to start a moment of silence at 7:55 a.m., the exact time the bombing began in 1941.

    Crew members lined the edge of the Navy guided-missile destroyer in the harbor where the USS Arizona and USS Utah, battleships that sank in the attack, still lie. Hawaii Air National Guard F-22 fighter jets flew overhead in a special "missing man" formation to break the silence.

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, e-mail losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.

    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA is at 2390 North Road. 662-5151, bethluth.com. Worship services are at 8:15 and 10:45 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant and a well-staffed nursery is provided.  All are welcome. Come Join the Family.

    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.

    Buddhist
    Kannon Zendo, 35 Barranca Road. kannonzendo.org. Henry Chigen Finney, 661-6874. Meditation in the Zen tradition will be offered Wednesday evenings at the Kannon Zendo in Los Alamos.

    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. Join us at 10:30 a.m. for worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.

  • What do you think about the end of the Mayan Calendar on Dec. 21? — AN

    It seems there are two common opinions regarding Dec. 21, 2012. One is that it signifies the end of the world; another is that it signifies a major world transformation.
    Since, for most Christians, “the end of the world” means “the second coming,” and since this can be a source of anxiety, this is the signification I will address.
    The Lord spoke clearly on this subject. “No one knoweth the day and hour.” Matt. 24:36. This includes the Mayans. For Christians, “the apocalypse,” is indicated by “the second coming.”
    The Second Coming is frankly none of our business. To think that it is prelest — the worst spiritual delusion. The Lord did not say, “try to figure out the day and hour.” Rather, He said “watch,” “be ready.” Orthodox do not live our spiritual lives based on the second coming, but rather, on the fact that he is already in our midst today, in his body, the church.
    Many Christian groups and sects have become so concerned with the end times that it has become a way to manipulate others, as well as a source of distraction, division and fear.

  • Scholastic books are for sale at The Family YMCA from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily, through Thursday. The public is welcome to come to the Y and shop. A variety of picture books to young adult novels are available.
    Partial proceeds will benefit the Y’s annual campaign that supports scholarships for those needing financial assistance.

  • Today
    The December meeting of the Los Alamos Master Gardeners will be a potluck dinner 6:30 p.m. at the home of Denise George, 411 Cheryl Ave. 672-9688

    The Mesa Public Library Free Film Series presents “A Separation” at 6:30 p.m.
    Friday
    Los Alamos Chapter 63, Order of Eastern Star, is selling fruitcakes, apricot pecan and pineapple pecan cakes, from 9 a.m.-6 p.m. in the lobby of Los Alamos National Bank. Contact Judy Goldie, 662-3797 or goldienm@comcast.net; Nina Laird, 662-7580; or Betty Robertson, 662-5185, for more information.

    The 19th Annual Los Alamos Créche (Nativity) Show will be from 1-7 p.m. Dec. 7 and from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Dec. 8 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 1967 18th St. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints sponsors the nativity exhibition, which is part of the annual WinterFest week celebration, the first week of December. Anyone in the community is invited to share a nativity set or more, if they collect nativity sets. Everyone is invited to the exhibit, which features crèches from members of most churches in Los Alamos. Bring the crèches to the LDS Church from 7 a.m.-noon Friday. The exhibit is free and refreshments will be served throughout the day.

  • On Dec. 1, the Los Alamos High School NJROTC took 42 cadets to compete against 11 other schools from New Mexico and Colorado in the Area 9 West Drill, Academic and Fitness Championships.
    They finished as follows:
    First place: Academics, overall fitness, armed drill, 16x100 relay. Second place: Unarmed regulation drill, unarmed exhibition drill, color guard, personnel inspection, 8x220 relay.
    Individual awards went to the following cadets: Academics, Felicity Kubic, first place; David Murphy, second place; Kyle Partin, fourth place. Boys push-ups: Jordi Kandarian, first place; John Gibson, fourth place.
    Girls push-ups: Tessa Snyder, third place and Melissa Wysocki, fifth place. Boys sit-ups: Jordi Kandarian, second place; Diego Cardiel, third place; Rigel Baron, fourth place. Girls sit-ups: Gianna Maggiore, first place and Rachel Barthell, second place.
    Kyle Partin took first place in the armed commander category; Richard Whittemore took first place in the individual drill dow; and Victoria Hypes took second place in the unarmed commander category
    The NJROTC took first place overall at this competition and once again, for the fourth straight year, earned a spot to compete at the Regional Competition in Kansas City on Feb. 23.

  • Art openings

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces the annual group exhibit, “A Square Foot of Humor.” The exhibit will be up through Jan. 8. The show will open with a reception from 5-7 p.m. Nov. 30 at 435 S. Guadalupe St., Santa Fe. For more information, visit zanebennettgallery.com.
    Bazaar

    There will be a Christmas Bazaar at the Pueblo de San Ildefonso Gymnasium, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Arts and crafts, baked goods, raffles, a food booth and more will be featured.
    Christmas events

    Taos will sparkle as galleries, studios, merchants and museums collaborate for Lighting Ledoux, at 7 p.m. Saturday. This free event is a time for friends and family of all ages to explore historic Ledoux Street in the heart of downtown Taos.
    Performances

    Experience a night of music with award-winning a cappella group, New Directions Veterans Choir. The group includes veterans who have overcome challenges with homelessness, incarceration and addiction. They come to Popejoy Hall at 8 p.m. Friday.  Tickets are $20-$39 and can be purchased at popejoypresents.com, unmtickets.com or by calling 877-664-8661.

  • Trinity Drive. Peggy Sue Bridge. Bathtub Row. The history of Los Alamos is written it the names given to locations around town.
    The origins of those names and many more are discussed in the second edition of “Place Names of Los Alamos” by local author Craig Martin.
    “The first edition has been out of print since 2002 and I’ve been promising the Los Alamos Historical Society an update since 2005, so it’s about time,” Martin said.
    The book chronicles the stories behind about 500 names and the second edition includes two-dozen new places that have acquired names in the 15 years since the book was first published. And the names of a few places have taken on greater meaning over the years.
    “Cerro Grande was just ‘big hill’ in 1998, but of course now the name is strongly associated with the fire of 2000,” Martin said.
    “Las Conchas, the mountain to the west, wasn’t mentioned before because it is in Sandoval County, but now the name is deeply associated with Los Alamos.”
    Basic names are descriptive, but in New Mexico, they can come in English, Spanish or Native American tongues.
    Other names come from a variety of sources ranging from governmental decree to naming contests to personal memorials.

  • Longtime Los Alamos resident Cary Neeper’s second novel, “The Webs of Varok” launched Dec. 4.
    A new independent press, California micropublisher Penscript Publishing House, released the book to online booksellers in hardcopy, paperback and e-book formats.
    The second book in “The Archives of Varok” series, this young-adult/crossover science fiction title follows the human and alien cast from Neeper’s 1975 first-contact novel, “A Place Beyond Man,” as they leave a troubled 21st century Earth for the promise of stability on another world.
    What will it take to secure that promise, after a talented traitor sets her eye on the world’s wealth — and their fragile new family?
    Weaving real issues into the fabric of the story, Neeper illustrates sustainability and ecological economics though example.
    She explores trade-offs in planetary stewardship through the adventures of her amiable aliens on a veiled moon of Jupiter.
    Neeper is an avid student of sustainability, steady-state economics and the impact of cosmology on issues of science and religion.
    In addition to the “Archives of Varok” novels, she has written two musical science fiction comedies and book reviews for The Christian Science Monitor.

  • The Village of Jemez Springs will officially kick off the holiday season with a series of events and festivities around town on Saturday.
    The day begins at 3 p.m. with the traditional performance by the Albuquerque Boys Choir, at Our Lady of the Assumption Church, across from the state monument. Elliot Higgins and the Hummingbird music camp facilitate the annual event. Admission is free.
    The community Holiday festivities in the park start at 4:30 p.m. with music performed by local kids and an opportunity for families to help decorate the Christmas tree. Musicians include Sage Mijares with her young Suzuki violin students. Mijares will also perform with her siblings, Noah and Isabella. Music students from Jemez Valley public schools will also perform.
    Santa will arrive at the gazebo at 5 p.m., followed by the annual Christmas tree lighting and caroling at 5:30 p.m. Friends of the Library will offer baked goods and free warm drinks, in the conference room, next to the library.
    From 5-9 p.m., the state monument hosts the annual luminaria event among the ruins of the old Gisewa pueblo and San Jose de los Jemez Mission Church. The event is free and includes hundreds of traditional luminarias, Native American flute music and Jemez pueblo dancers.