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Today's Features

  • The community will be treated to an evening of glowing Jack o’ lanterns. Beginning at 6 p.m. Saturday, the Los Alamos Arts Council will present its 11th annual Pumpkin Glow on the Fuller Lodge lawn.  
    This event features hundreds of pumpkins carved by community members. Everyone is encouraged to participate by dropping off carved pumpkins Saturday on the Fuller Lodge lawn.
    The event, sponsored by Smith’s Food and Drug, Village Arts, Los Alamos National Bank and MainStreet will feature hundreds of pumpkins designed and carved by everyone, from young children to professional artists. Creations of all sorts will glimmer in the night.
    Some highlights from past Pumpkin Glows include carvings of historical world landmarks, tributes to the armed forces, Alfred Hitchcock-themed pumpkins, totem poles of carved Tiki patterns and a wide variety of creepy creatures created by local Boy Scouts.
    A new addition has been the animated ghosts and pumpkins appearing in and out of the windows at Fuller Lodge, accompanied by Halloween music. Once again, this will be part of the event. Sponsor logos will dance across Fuller Lodge as a part of the animation. Groups can also create spooky scenes such as the cemetery, done by the scouts each year.

  • Today
    Republican candidate Jefferson Byrd will visit Los Alamos for a town hall meeting at 5 p.m. at the GOP headquarters, 1362 Trinity Dr., Suite D1. The public is welcome to attend.

    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.

    Los Alamos High School will host a Financial Aid Information Night at 6 p.m. in the Speech Theater. All interested students and parents are encouraged to attend. New Mexico Educational Assistance Foundation Representative Ruben Reyes will provide information about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, scholarships, grants, work-study programs and loan programs. For more information about Financial Aid Information Night, contact Connie Goettee at 663-2595 or c.goettee@laschools.net.

    The Los Alamos Community of Atheists will host an open discussion at 6:30 p.m. in meeting room 1 of the Mesa Public Library. Questions can be sent to losalamoscommunityofatheists.com.

    Thursday
    The last outdoor Farmers Market of the season will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

  • Community members are invited to visit the Scholastic Book Fair online at the Los Almaos Middle School web site. The online store will offer books for all age levels and will be available on the web site from Oct. 28-Nov. 17. All books will be delivered free to the library and held until parents or students pick them up.
    The Middle School Scholastic Book Fair will be in the library portable and will not be as large as normal, due to size constraints. The book fair will be from 7:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 5-9.

  • The Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos will hold its annual fall pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. Saturday at the Betty Ehart Senior Center—and this year, the breakfast will feature a Halloween twist.
    The serving line, staffed by Kiwanis members and volunteers from Kiwanis-affiliated youth organizations, will provide pancakes, sausage, scrambled eggs, coffee, juice and milk. Seconds will be available until the food runs out.
    During the breakfast, from 9 a.m.-9:30 a.m., costumed witches will “fly” through the dining room, distributing wrapped candies to children.
    Kiwanis are selling tickets and tickets will also be available at the door. The cost is $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens and $4 for children.
    Kiwanis uses the proceeds from the fall breakfast to support a long list of service projects. Among them are: college scholarships; the Senior Appreciation Night Breakfast; the Fourth of July Fireworks at Overlook Park; Breakfast with Santa; Los Alamos Science Fair prizes distributed by Kiwanis; and Kiwanis children’s organizations including Key Club, Builders Club, K-Kids at Barranca and K-Kids at Aspen.

  • Recently, the Chamisa Elementary PTO celebrated three students’ reading efforts over the summer, with the help of the local Masons.The students were awarded bicycles. Pictured from left to right are: Norissa Valdez, third grade; Susan Herrera; Jake Turin, Mason representative; Nate Turner, fifth grade; and and Malachi Laskie, kindergarten. C Students that read during the summer assist the retention of knowledge from the previous school year. The work with the Masons has aided the summer reading program of kindergarten through sixth graders. Students have been known to increase their reading time, recorded in minutes, into the hundreds and in some cases, the thousands.

  • Parent involvement in schooling is our focus this week. This is defined as parents being actively engaged in helping their children succeed in school.
    There are so many ways to be involved. From checking, — but not hovering over Powerschool — to attending school events and supporting school efforts, the possibilities are endless.
    This year, elementary parents will be able to check Poweschool for some grades and I caution parents not to go over the deep end with this opportunity.
    Use this year as a training ground for preparing for middle school.
    If there’s one thing I could tell you, it is to provide opportunities for your student to accomplish an assignment over several days or weeks before it is due.
    The science fair, for example, is one way that you can remind students not to save everything for the weekend before the project is due.
    The goal is not to help your student so much that they don’t accomplish the goal on their own. If everything is saved until the day before it is due, then let them sweat it out. Let them have to sacrifice something fun, a game, an event, some television or video game playing to finish the project. If you save the day every time, it will come back to bite you in the butt, I promise.

  • Wednesday
    Republican candidate Jefferson Byrd will visit Los Alamos for a town hall meeting at 5 p.m. at the GOP headquarters, 1362 Trinity Dr., Suite D1. The public is welcome to attend.

    GeekOut Family Night will be from 5:30-8:30 p.m. upstairs, at Mesa Public Library. Bring your own games, or play theirs.

    Los Alamos High School will host a Financial Aid Information Night at 6 p.m. in the Speech Theater. All interested students and parents are encouraged to attend. New Mexico Educational Assistance Foundation Representative Ruben Reyes will provide information about the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, scholarships, grants, work-study programs and loan programs. An LAHS counselor will also be available to answer questions. For more information about Financial Aid Information Night, contact Connie Goettee at 663-2595 or c.goettee@laschools.net.

    The Los Alamos Community of Atheists will host an open discussion at 6:30 p.m. in meeting room 1 of the Mesa Public Library. All are welcome. Bring any topics or thoughts you might have. Questions can be sent to losalamoscommunityofatheists.com.

    Thursday
    The last outdoor Farmers Market of the season will be from 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

  • Consumers are in for a shock when Microsoft releases the Windows 8 operating system later this week. The interface changes are the most widespread the OS maker has undertaken since the release of Windows 95.

  • SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Russell Means never shunned attention. Whether leading Native Americans in railing against broken federal treaties, appearing in a Hollywood blockbuster or advocating a sovereign American Indian nation within U.S. borders, the activist who helped lead the 1973 uprising at Wounded Knee reveled in the spotlight.

    But it was only on his terms. Openly critical of mainstream media, the onetime leader of the American Indian Movement often refused interviews and verbally blasted journalists who showed up to cover his public appearances. Instead, he chose to speak to his fan base through YouTube videos and blog posts on his personal website.

    When he did speak out publicly, he remained steadfast in his defense of AIM. He found himself dogged for decades by questions about the group's alleged involvement in the slaying of a tribe member and the several gun battles with federal officers during the 71-day occupation of Wounded Knee, but denied the group ever promoted violence.