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Today's Features

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offer the first in a series of three classes on travel and nature journaling taught by Terry Foxx, Katy Korkos and Fairley Barnes Nov. 6.
    The class is on three consecutive Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m., and costs $40 for PEEC members and $50 for all others.
    This price includes all supplies and materials for the three sessions.
    Many are looking for ways to connect with the world through travel or through observing nature.  When traveling, people pack their suitcase with a notebook intended to be a journal.
    The first one or two nights, they are judicious in writing notes, then life overtakes them and they come home with a blank notebook. Or they go on a walk, something catches their eye and they want to remember. But they say to themselves, “I’m not an artist” and they tuck the experience away in memory that soon fades.
    But there is a more permanent way to record explorations. Korkos, Barnes and Foxx will share ways to record observations, feelings,and experiences in a variety of journal types that are simple, easily done and don’t require a mastery of art.
    For more information and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

  • The internationally-recognized, award-winning book, “True Brit — Beatrice, 1940,” written by Santa Fe author Rosemary Zibart and illustrated by Santa Fe artist George Lawrence, has been named a finalist in two categories of the New Mexico/Arizona Book Awards.
    “True Brit” is a finalist in the Young Adult and Historical Fiction categories. The book has previously received a Gold Award for Historical Fiction from Mom’s Choice Awards and was a finalist in the 2011 London Book Awards.
    In “True Brit,” a spoiled English girl, Beatrice Sims, comes to Santa Fe to live with practical, hard-working nurse Clementine Pope.
    At first, the 12-year-old hates the dusty little town. But soon Beatrice makes friends with goofy Arabella, develops a crush on handsome Esteban and aids Ana, a shy Indian girl. First accused of being “faceta” — stuck up, Beatrice learns to change tires, ride wild ponies and helps Clem rescue a sick baby on an Indian pueblo.
    The inspiration for the story came 15 years ago when Zibart was reading the New Mexican newspaper. She noticed in the “50 Years Ago Today” column, a snippet of news about four English girls arriving in Santa Fe.

  • THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, November 2, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (10-30-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Living Treasures Ceremony Fall 2012
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Geology of the Rio Grande”
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, November 3, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, November 4, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, November 5, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Elizabeth Clare Prophet
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM League of Women Voters Candidate Forum  10-11-12
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Education is Hope
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • The following restaurant inspection reports were provided by the New Mexico Environment Department.

    Los Alamos

    Aspen Lounge, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: One high-risk violation for contaminated equipment — sanitizer didn’t have solution made. One cap of bleach per one gallon of warm water. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Hilltop House Convenience Store, 400 Trinity Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: None
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Los Alamos Holiday Inn Express, 60 Entrada Dr.
    Date inspected: Oct. 30
    Violations: Three high-risk violations, two for improper holding — milk, refrigerator needs to be turned down. Corrected; eggs without shell at 45 degrees, corrected, thrown out; sausage at 170 degrees, corrected and thrown out. Food handler said she turned off warmer over half an hour ago, since no customers. One for poor personal hygiene — hand wash sink needs paper towels. Corrected.
    Notes: Milk display refrigerator needs temperature turned down. Corrected.
    Status of establishment: Approved, no follow-up required.

    Santa Fe

    Classic Fare and Catering

  • Finding a decent Northern New Mexican meal on the Hill is not an easy task. In fact, it’s nearly impossible.
    Yes, there are restaurants that churn out Northern New Mexican food, but there’s always something missing.
    Sometimes the dishes lack flavor and sometimes the chile is no more than bland chile water. There’s no heat and there’s no flavor. Until now.
    DeColores Restaurant has been at the same location for years. It’s on the edge of town, so it’s sometimes forgotten. But it’s well worth your while to have a meal or two there.
    On a recent Thursday evening, the restaurant was practically empty.
    A singer/guitarist entertained the handful of patrons scattered about the dining area.
    One look at the menu and it was evident that things had changed.
    The prices had gone up slightly, but there was also a lot more to choose from.
    In addition to the traditional Northern New Mexican fare, the restaurant also offers a variety of hamburgers, salads and other items.
    It was hard to make a decision about what to order, but the waitress was patient, coming back a couple of times before a decision was made.
    In the meantime, free chips and salsa were offered to munch away on as the menu was browsed. The chips were good.

  • Oct.  31 may have come and gone, but that doesn’t mean Halloween has to end.
    Los Alamos Little Theatre brings the spooky and macabre to the stage with their production of “The Woman in Black,” directed by Laurie Tomlinson and starring Patrick Webb and Warren Houghteling.
    The plot follows Arthur Kipps, who is trying to “perform a story and hires an actor to help him. They attempt a performance about when Kipps went to help settle the estate of the late Mrs. Drablow. When Kipps attends the funeral, he first encounters the woman in black. He inquires about the woman at the funeral, only to find out there was no woman there.
    “Kipps begins to sort through some papers and again encounters the woman in black at a cemetery. He soon begins to realize the possibility that this woman is an unsettled spirit. He becomes very aware that what he is seeing is s ghost,” according to the LALT newsletter.
    Tomlinson, who has directed the last three musicals for Los Alamos Light Opera, and has been involved with LALT since 1984, said she decided to direct “The Woman in Black” because the movie with Daniel Radcliffe (aka Harry Potter) came out last spring. This also happens to be the first non-musical that she has directed.

  • The Dia de los Muertos show at Northern New Mexico College has become an annual tradition.
    Now in its fourth year, the show will once again feature 16 artists from Northern New Mexico and beyond, displaying their best interpretations of the Day of the Dead. The man behind the show is Española’s Toby Morfin. For the past few years, Morfin has curated the show, all in an effort to share his — and other artists’ — talent with valley residents and those from surrounding areas. This year, Española artist Cruz Lopez also helped curate the show.
    The type of work displayed is as varied as the artists that create it. A good portion of the artists have done the show before, but there are also some new faces this year. Rachel Montoya is one of the newbies. Montoya, a jewelry artist, collaborated with Arturo Montaño for this exhibit. But she’s no stranger to exhibiting her work. In fact, she won first place for jewelry at this year’s Spanish Market.
    “It’s nice to add her to the show,” Morfin said. He said the show continues to improve each year and has attracted a big audience.

  • The Hilltalkers are seeking volunteer judges for the 50th annual Speech and Debate tournament Friday and Saturday. This year, the tournament will be at Los Alamos High School.  
    If you have any questions or would like to volunteer, feel free to call coaches Janet Newton or Toni Batha at 663-2651 or 663-2540 or email Batha at m.batha@laschools.net, Newton at j.newton@laschools.net or judge coordinator Katie Haynes, at katie.haynes@comcast.net. Make sure to provide your contact information.
    Individual Events include Humorous Interpretation (HI), Dramatic Interpretation (DI), Extemporaneous Speaking (Extemp), Duo Interpretation (Duo), Duet Improvisation (Duet), Original Oratory (OO), Expository Speaking (Expos) and Oral Interpretation (OI).
    Debate Events include Policy Debate (CX), Lincoln-Douglas Debate (LD), and Public Forum Debate (PF).

  • Red Cross Babysitters Course
    The Family YMCA is now taking registration for the Nov.16 and 17 session of its American Red Cross Babysitters Course.
    The course is designed by the American Red Cross to prepare youth with training in babysitter safety, basic child care, safe play, first aid and critical emergency skills, essential professional, leadership and care-giving skills and how to manage real-life problems.
    The session will be from 4-8:30 p.m. Nov. 16 and from 1-5:30 p.m. Nov. 17. Participants must be aged 11-17 and complete both days of the session they register for in order to receive certification. Cost is $110, prices are set by Red Cross.

  • As Director of the Betty Ehart Senior Center and as a music therapist, Pauline Schneider sees both the difficulties dementia sufferers and their caregivers face daily and also how music and the arts can help people connect and enjoy the  arts’ effects.
    “I have worked with people in all phases of dementia and even those who seem to have stopped relating to the world around them, remarkably respond to music. One person, who hadn’t spoken for quite some time, began to sing along with a familiar tune from decades ago and knew all the words, stayed on key and stayed focused until it was over,” Schneider said.
    She invited Mary Yamada of the Los Alamos Retirement Community, who has worked with people with dementia for 15 years and Carol Meine of Mesa Public Library arts programming, to get together and create a pilot program for people with dementia and their caregivers to meet in a non-clinical setting to enjoy the arts together.