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Today's Features

  • Whether you are taking your animal in for their regular check-up or making an emergency visit, being evaluated by a veterinarian is a critical part in your pet’s health. But what if an animal is too sick or injured to be transported to the clinic? Some animals, such as livestock, may even require a trailer for transport. Luckily for pet and livestock owners, mobile veterinarians are there to help.

    Leslie Easterwood, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the important role mobile veterinarians play in animal health.

    “The most common reason for an owner to use a mobile veterinarian is so that they do not have to transport their animal to a hospital,” Easterwood said. “There could be a variety of reasons why having the veterinarian come to the farm or home is better, such as situations where there are several animals to be treated or the owner does not have access to a livestock trailer.”

  • Meet Ball, the Los Alamos Animal Shelter’s Pet of the Week. Ball is a handsome Shar-Pei mix with soft, short- to mid-length, curled fur who is looking for a forever home. Ball has been at the shelter since July 24.

    Ball is about 1 year old and knows some basic commands, like “sit” and “lay down.” Ball is smart, playful and has the biggest personality. Although he might be a little shy in new situations, Ball will quickly warm up to a buddy willing to play with him. Ball also loves to snuggle and will hold hands if someone stops petting him.

    Ball can be protective of his home, but does not climb, jump or dig under a fence.

    He is up-to-date on all shots and vaccinations, so Ball is available for adoption.
    For more information on this sweet boy, contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179, or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

    Photo by Paulina Gwaltney Photography, 910-333-6362. Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • TRENTON, N.J. — A 9-year-old New Jersey boy who described himself as a “Guardian of the Galaxy” is hoping to add the real-life NASA title “Planetary Protection Officer” to his resume.

    NASA received an application for the position from fourth-grader Jack Davis, who asked to apply for the job. In a letter the agency posted online , Jack acknowledged his youth, but said that will make it easier for him to learn how to think like an alien. He said he has seen all the space and alien movies he can see, and he is great at video games.

    “My sister says I am an alien also,” Jack wrote in the hand-written letter dated Aug. 3.

    Jack received a letter from NASA Planetary Science Director James Green encouraging him to study hard so he can one day join them at the agency.

    “We are always looking for bright future scientists and engineers to help us,” Green wrote his response, which was also posted online. Green told Jack the job is about protecting other planets and moons “from our germs” as the agency explores the Solar System.

    Jack also received a phone call from NASA Planetary Research Director Jonathan Rall thanking him for his interest.

  • CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Total solar eclipses occur every year or two or three, often in the middle of nowhere like the South Pacific or Antarctic. What makes the Aug. 21 eclipse so special is that it will cut diagonally across the entire United States.

    The path of totality — where day briefly becomes night — will pass over Oregon, continuing through the heartland all the way to Charleston, South Carolina. Those on the outskirts — well into Canada, Central America and even the top of South America — will be treated to a partial eclipse.

    The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918.

    No tickets are required for this Monday show, just special eclipse glasses so you don’t ruin your eyes.
    Some eclipse tidbits:

    What’s a total solar eclipse?

  • Come to the Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting on Aug. 22 at the Nature Center to hear from adventurer Forest Altherr about his rock climbing experiences in Yosemite.

    The presentation will begin at 7:15 p.m. The Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting will start at 7 p.m. and cover information about upcoming outings.


    Forest Altherr has explored the cracks, crevasses and faces of Yosemite’s largest granite slabs since 2008. Inspired by the valley’s iconic monoliths, Altherr initially dedicated himself to the craft of honing the intellectual, psychological, and physical skills necessary to climb many of the classic routes on El Capitan. While primarily a rock climber with a taste for big routes,

    Altherr enjoys all aspects of climbing. Not only is the sport thrilling, but it also provides a sense of connection among dedicated climbers worldwide.

    Altherr will explore the contrast between dichotomous styles of big wall climbing: vertical camping and speed climbing.
    The Los Alamos Mountaineers meetings are always free to the public, and no registration is required.

  • The money they gave Jamy Malone was very important, but even more important to her was the belief members of the White Rock Presbyterian Church had in her.

    That’s what one of the recipients of a $2,500 “Julie’s Helpers” scholarship told the crowd at the Helpers annual picnic July 30.

    “The check was not the most beautiful thing. Don’t get me wrong, I was excited when I got it… but the most beautiful thing was that you saw value in me and that made the biggest difference,” Malone said to the crowd. “I will carry that with me forever. You guys could have given me $100, but it was the words that really touched my heart and gave me more strength to keep going and be an inspiration for my children, to be the rock they need, because sometimes, they’re my rock.”

    A single mother of three, Malone has traveled a tough road.

    She wasn’t expecting the scholarship, she told church members. She applied with the hope that she would get it.

    “So, when I got the phone call saying that I got it, I almost started crying,” she said.

    Malone’s parents divorced when she was in the first grade, and then her education suffered.

  • Teatro Paraguas and SageRight Productions will present a new play this month by Robert F. Benjamin, of Los Alamos, entitled “Still in The Game” for 10 performances.
    The play will open Aug. 10 at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe.

    “Still in the Game” is the third piece in a trilogy about “aging with grace, courage and humor.” Two previous “aging” plays were produced at Teatro Paraguas, “Not Quite Right” and “Salt and Pepper.”

    Directed by Sheryl Bailey, “Still In The Game” focuses on the journey of David (played by Jim McGiffin), a recently widowed retiree in his 70s, who is struggling with loneliness, moving forward and family acceptance.

    His daughter Dawn (Juliet Salazar) encourages David to be more social but becomes concerned when she discovers her father has made female companions.

    At an evening of speed dating, David meets Ruby (Marguerite Scott), where the attraction is palpable. Their subsequent mutual happiness is thrown off-balance by a major change in David’s health, which triggers a clash between the women in his life.

    As David and those around him struggle to change, his quirky humor and uncanny wisdom shine through in this fun, yet serious family drama.

  • Los Alamos natives Kristen Annalize Sussman (soprano) and Nathan Salazar (piano) will give a free concert of opera and art songs at 3 p.m. Aug. 5 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 2390 North Road, Los Alamos.
    Sussman and Salazar perform around the world as professional musicians and are joyful to share a homecoming concert together.

  • The Lensic and Santa Fe Opera will present the 2017-2018 season of The Met: Live in HD, the Metropolitan Opera’s award-winning series of high-definition live cinema simulcasts. The HD season includes 10 operas, with five new productions and starry revivals starring the world’s leading opera artists.

    The 2017-18 Live in HD season will feature the series’ first broadcast of Bellini’s Norma, starring Sondra Radvanovsky in the title role; the Met premiere of Thomas Adès’s “The Exterminating Angel;” Rossini’s “Semiramide,” which has not been staged at the Met in 25 years; Verdi’s tragedy “Luisa Miller,” starring Sonya Yoncheva and Plácido Domingo; and the Met premiere of Massenet’s “Cendrillon,” starring Joyce DiDonato in the title role.

    Audiences can also see the Met’s new stagings of “Puccini’s Tosca,” starring Sonya Yoncheva and Vitorio Grigolo, and Mozart’s Così fan tutte, set in 1950s Coney Island, with an ensemble cast including Tony Award winner Kelli O’Hara.

  • Do you want to learn more about butterflies? Are you already a butterfly expert, but want to help with the annual count?

    The annual butterfly event is for beginners, experts and everyone in between. Participants will honor the memory of

    Dorothy Hoard by fluttering to three places around the Pajarito Plateau: atop a mesa, at a high altitude and along a stream Saturday.

    New Mexico butterfly expert Steve Cary will be at the event to help identify butterflies and discuss their life histories.

    The first count will start between 9-10:45 a.m. Saturday at the Burnt Mesa Trailhead in Bandelier, located off of State Highway 4.

    The group will then move to Camp May from 11:15 a.m.-12:45 p.m., where participants will stop to eat lunch.

    The final stop will be Cañon de Valle along State Road 501 from 1:45-3:15 p.m.

    Butterfly counters are welcome to stay for the whole day or opt to only count at some locations.