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Today's Features

  • TaraShea Nesbit’s first novel has captured the essence of what it was like to be a woman starting a new — and usually unwanted life in a strange land during World War II.
    The strange land being the secret spot of Los Alamos, which was so secret no one could drive up there.
    Scientists who were summoned for their skills, brought their wives with little or no explanation.
    These wives were usually educated women from big cities like Chicago or Boston, or another big city east of the Mississippi. The dusty terrain of Los Alamos of the past was, to say the least, difficult to get used to.
    Told in a collective voice, Nesbit’s novel has the various perspectives of many women, without giving names. The constant of the novel contained the frustrations with the hardships of every day life and the curiosities of “Why are we here?” and “What does my husband do at work?”
    None of those questions were answered, of course, until the first atomic bomb was completed and two cities in Japan were reduced to a smoldering pile of rubble. The women returned back home and to their former lives, but changed in many grand ways.

  • New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company, directed by Susan Baker-Dillingham, presents “The Nutcracker.”
     This timeless classic revolves around Clara, who receives the gift of a toy nutcracker from her Uncle Drosselmeyer. Clara then dreams of a fantastic world in which she and the Nutcracker meet many interesting characters.
     Notable NMDT-PC dancers in the production include Indiana Warrior as Clara, Daren Savage as Uncle Drosselmeyer, Sarah Dale as The Snow Queen, Frank Macias as The Snow King, Louisa Belian as The Sugar Plum Fairy and Devon McCleskey as The Cavalier. Special guest Giovanni Echave, from the School of the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, will perform the role of The Nutcracker Prince.
    “The Nutcracker” will be performed 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Duane W. Smith auditorium.
    Tickets are available for purchase in advance at Uli’s Cottontails or at the door 45 minutes prior to performance times.
    Prices are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and students and free for children age four and under. Veterans are invited to attend the Sunday matinee free of charge.

  • Today
    Meet the Birds. 7 p.m. Join nature photographer Steve Kaye for a photo tour of birds. Kaye will show us how his bird photography has led to a deeper connection with nature and important lessons for living. No advance registration required. Free. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    “Masquerade.” Daily through Nov. 15 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center.

    “No Limitations.” Work by photographer Kimber Wallwork-Heineman. Daily through November at the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Gallery.
    Thursday
    Aaron’s Kids Closet will be open from 10:30 a.m-noon at First United Methodist Church, 715 Diamond Dr. Clothing, shoes and coats, etc. are available for school-aged children. For more information, or to donate call 660-0340.

    Families in Action: for Teens and Parents. An evidence-based class to ease the transition as children turn into young adults. 6:30-8:15 p.m. every Thursday through Nov. 20 at 1900 Diamond Dr., Pueblo Complex. For more information, visit lafsn.org, or call 662-4515.

  • Kaylie Burk, a junior at Los Alamos High School, has been nominated to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Washington, D.C. Friday through Sunday.
    The Congress of Future Medical Leaders is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research fields.
    Burk was nominated by Dr. Connie Mariano, the medical director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Los Alamos High School based on her academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the field of medicine.

  • The Los Alamos Co-op Market is having its last two cooking classes of the year.
    Dehydrator snacks will be the focus on Nov. 18. Lisa Johnson will show the calss how to make healthy snacks and save money by making the most out of a dehydrator.
    Johnson will also discuss how to customize each recipe to meet the participant’s desired flavor profile.
    The final cooking class of the year will be Dec. 9. Harshini Mukundan will share vegetarian recipes from North India. The cuisine is inspired by Mughalai cooking style, developed by the imperial kitchens of the Muslim Mughal Empire in South Asia.
    Although vegetarian versions will be taught, Mukundan will discuss how to modify the dishes to include chicken, if there is interest.
    Mukundan will also describe low fat and vegan alternatives for both the rice and curry dish.
    The co-op’s Shop with the Chef cooking classes give local chefs the opportunity to share their love of cuisine, starting with shopping for the ingredients and taking participants through the cooking process to all the way to the final product.
    Registration is available through the co-op for $15 for members and $20 for nonmembers. Classes are at 6 p.m. and held in the café at the Entrada location.

  • Today
    “Masquerade.” Daily through Nov. 15 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center.

    “No Limitations.” Work by photographer Kimber Wallwork-Heineman. Daily through November at the Mesa Public Library Upstairs Gallery.
    Wednesday
    What Do You Eat with a Bill Like This? 1:30-2:30 p.m. Treat your kids to an interactive discovery of how birds live and what they eat. Photographer and birder Steve Kaye will show photos of birds, and then invite the children to guess how each bird might use its bill to find food. There will be a short hike after. No advance registration required. Free. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    The Great Books discussion group is now called Mesa Readers. The group meets from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Mesa Public Library. All are welcome. For more information, call Mary Cernicek at 662-7100.

  • This week, I wanted to focus on the data from the 2013 New Mexico Risk and Resiliency Survey.
    I will also remind you that I write this column as the assets coordinator, based on the 40 Developmental Assets that when put together illustrate what traits, values, experiences to help youth grow to become successful adults.
    One of the items that received attention was the use of meth and heroin. The data reports that the use is 3.7 to 3.1, respectively. As a parent in the community, I am equally not thrilled with some of the numbers.
    I know most people won’t take the time to look up the data, so I’ll use this column and more in the future to highlight some of the data, for those that don’t have the time.
    One of the larger numbers was marijuana use, which was 20 percent. While I find that number high, you can’t look at that without the consideration of how many adults find it a recreational thing, turn a blind eye, see it as a rite of passage and it doesn’t help that our neighboring state has made it legal and available.
    What we really need to think about is what is driving them to get high, and school isn’t always the reason.
    Inhale, roll your eyes at me and read on because there is so much more.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will host two different programs regarding birds.
    “What Do You Eat with a Bill Like This?” is the idea behind the interactive program that shows how birds live and eat. The presentation will be from 1:30-2:30 p.m. Nov. 12 at the center on Orange St.
    Nature photographer and birder Steve Kaye will show photos of birds, and then he will invite the children to guess how each bird might use its bill to find food. There will be a short hike afterward.
    Kaye will then lead a photo tour of birds 7 p.m. that same day at PEEC. In this presentation, Kaye will demonstrate how his photographing birds have led to a deeper connection with nature and important lessons in joyful living.
    Kaye has been taking photos casually since 1965 and professionally since 2010. He uses these photos in talks and articles to inspire respect for nature. He is the author of a novel, four books on leadership topics, more than 400 articles and five collections of poetry. Learn more at stevekayephoto.com.
    The programs are free to attend, and no registration is required. Children must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org, or call 662-0460.

  •  

    Nov. 9-15, 2014

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY

    8:45 a.m. Cardio

    10 a.m. Talk: Alan B. Carr, “Overview of the
    Second World War”

  •  

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets. Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.