Today's Features

  • Felipe Rodriguez says he thought he was hallucinating when an eagle snatched his sister’s little white dog from her yard, flapped its massive wings and disappeared over the trees.

    Did he really just see that?

    He had. Zoey the 8-pound bichon frise was gone, taken by a hungry raptor Tuesday afternoon not 50 feet from his sister’s house on the banks of the Lehigh River in Pennsylvania, Rodriguez said.

    “It seemed like something from the ‘Wizard of Oz,’” he told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “I’m a city boy. This doesn’t happen in my world.”

    Even more astonishing: Zoey would live to bark the tale.

    More on that later. But first, let it be said that eagles are quite capable of taking a small dog or a cat.

    “It has been documented before, but not that often,” said Laurie Goodrich, a biologist at nearby Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, a ridgetop preserve that annually records tens of thousands of migrating hawks, eagles and falcons.

    With food scarce and waterways freezing up, raptors are “looking a little more widely and taking advantage of whatever might be out there,” she said.

  • “Growing in God’s Goodness” is the theme of the sixth annual countywide “Women2Women” mini-conference.

    The mini-conference, which seeks to connect Los Alamos women with each other and with God, will take place 9 a.m.-noon, March 17, at the Los Alamos Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive.

    The morning of Christian fellowship, mutual encouragement, and spiritual strengthening is open to all women of the community. The event is free. Brunch will be served.

    The church began sponsoring the countywide conference in 2013 and has followed-up each year since. The plan is to hold an annual conference for all nine “fruit of the Spirit” as listed in the Apostle Paul’s biblical letter to the Galatians, chapter 5, verses 22 and 23.

    The 2018 featured speaker is Cheryl Ridlon, chaplain for the Los Alamos Fire Department and other area fire departments. In addition to serving in this volunteer position, Ridlon is an investigator who does background checks for Los Alamos National Laboratory. She is an outdoorswoman, particularly enjoying bike riding.




    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board. 


    Friday, February 23, 2018

    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live

    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 2-13-18

    1:00 PM Democracy Now!

    4:00 PM Uprising

    5:00 PM Democracy Now!

    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Harry Burgess

    7:00 PM Los Alamos History – A History of Land Transfers on the Pajarito Plateau

    8:00 PM Art Fusion – Live Radio Show with Dr. Hall & Brad Smith

    8:30 PM The LA Times with Peter Malmgren


    SANTA FE (AP) — The nonprofit behind the nearly century-old Santa Fe Indian Market has appointed a new executive director.

    A spokeswoman for the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts says Ira Wilson will take the helm of the organization, replacing Dallin Maybee.

    Maybee, an artist and attorney, announced recently that he was stepping down from the position.

    The annual Santa Fe Indian Market in August has been touted as one of the nation’s most prestigious art markets.

    Each August, it draws about 1,000 jewelers, potters and other artists, as well as roughly 150,000 people, to downtown Santa Fe.

    The juried art market on the city plaza lasts two days.

    Wilson, who is Navajo, joins the organization after 26 years with the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque.


    ALBUQUERQUE — For years, Zavier Thompson has followed of Marvel superhero movies. But the 16-year-old student in Albuquerque has always wanted to see a popular film with a black superhero and black themes.

    Thanks to an Albuquerque educator, the aspiring hip-hop and spoken word artist finally got his wish Thursday when he was given tickets to a private screening of “Black Panther.”

    “It was amazing. The music, the action...everything,” said Thompson, who is black. “It made me proud to see out culture depicted like that.”

    “Black Panther” is about the mythical and highly advanced African nation of Wakanda, where T’Challa, played by Chadwick Boseman, inherits the throne but is challenged by a Wakandan exile named Killmonger, played by Michael B. Jordan.  It’s the 18th film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and based on 50-year-old material created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby.


    LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II has always dressed with style and flair – but Tuesday marked her first visit to the showy catwalks of London Fashion Week.

    The monarch squeezed in the front row, chatting with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour — who wore her trademark sunglasses — and presented an award recognizing British design excellence.

    It was an unusual outing for the 91-year-old monarch, who seemed totally at ease at the type of event usually frequented by stars like Kate Moss and Sienna Miller. She was elegant in a Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny aquamarine Swarovski crystals set off by formal black gloves.

    Elizabeth carried a matching handbag – of course – and wore her mostly white hair swept back. The queen didn’t bother with the statement stiletto heels favored by many of the younger fashionistas, opting for sensible dark low-heeled court shoes for the awards presentation.


    NEW YORK — A lavish, headline-grabbing premiere. Lightning word-of-mouth stoked by glowing reviews. Packed movie theaters with sold-out shows, long lines and fans decked out as characters from the film.

    The phenomenon of “Black Panther” had the look and feel of a classic, bona fide blockbuster in route to its record-setting $201.8 million debut over the weekend, or an estimated $235 million Friday through Monday. Much has been made about the film industry’s struggles to tap into pop culture the way it once more regularly did – that TV and streaming options and a dearth of fresh ideas have diminished the power of the big screen.


    New drugs are under constant development but most fail in clinical trials. Why do so many drugs pass animal testing, but fail in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans? Are animal models of human diseases ultimately really a good model for humans?

    Enter ATHENA. ATHENA, which stands for Advanced Tissue-engineered Human External Network Analyzer, is designed to simulate organ systems – such as liver, heart, lung, and kidney – and can be used as a first-line test for potential toxicity analysis since the system can mimic the response of actual human organs. Such research could lead to faster approval and fewer potential side effects for new medications coming onto the market.

    Join Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this important field. Science On Tap is today 1 beginning at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Bring your Bradbury Science Museum Association membership card (or join on the spot – at very reasonable rates) and get $1 off your food and/or drink at Science On Tap.


    The Los Alamos County Library System will present the celebrated acoustic duo Hungrytown at 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave. 


    Last July, they returned from a successful six-and-a-half-month tour of the US, UK and New Zealand, covering over 16,000 miles in the U.S. 

    Hungrytown is currently on a four-month tour of the American south and southwest.

    Vermonters Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson, who make up Hungrytown, have been touring professionally for nearly 15 years. 

    Hungrytown’s songs and music have appeared in numerous television programs, including IFC’s “Portlandia,” Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and Neftlix’s new comedy, Lady Dynamite,” as well as various documentaries and major sporting events ranging from NASCAR to Hockey Night in Canada.

    Their third and latest album, “Further West,” made the top 10 on the American Folk DJ charts for two months, and at least 14 “Best of the year” lists. 


    The Los Alamos Community Winds will host “Joyride! A Journey in Music” Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church.

    LACW, an amateur wind ensemble formed by members of the greater Los Alamos community, will perform several popular selections such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade, op. 35 - IV. The Thief of Baghdad,” Franz von Suppé’s “Light Cavalry Overture,” and Percy Aldridge Grainger’s “Irish Tune from County Derry” and Shepherd’s “Hey.” 

    The Winds will also showcase several obscure pieces such as “On Parade,” by John Philip Sousa, Michael Markowski’s “Joyride,” Robert W. Smith’s “Songs of Sailor and Sea,” and Leonard Bernstein’s “Slava!” 

    In agreement with the title of the concert, the program provides a journey in music through the inclusion of operettas, symphonic suites, folk tunes and marches.