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Today's Features

  • Today
    Brown Bag Lecture: Environmental Stewardship. Noon -1 p.m. at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sam Loftin and Lorrie Bonds Lopez will provide the results of site-wide surveillance and progress toward far reaching environmental challenges to which the laboratory is committed. Free and open to the public.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    The League of Women Voters’ will be having a meeting to discuss the Education Study Committee’s research and how it is progressing. The public is welcome, 7 p.m. at UNM-LA, building 2, room 230.

    Play reading for “Mr. Roberts.” 7-9 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theater. Auditions set for Nov. 2-4 with performances scheduled for March 2015.
    Thursday
    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

    Race for the Cure Makeover Marathon at The Beauty Villa, 146 Central Park Square. Join local Mary Kay independent beauty consultants to raise money funds for breast cancer research and get a free no obligation facial. Call to reserve a date and time, 660-7258.

  • The 4th Annual Community Charity Pumpkin Patch will be 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday at the Calvary Chapel on North Mesa next to the Posse Shack. Bring the kids to the event is free where everybody gets a pumpkin, as well as Frito pies, donuts, cookies, hot chocolate, hot cider and other treats. There will also be face painting, games, a hayride and a petting zoo.

  • Los Alamos will soon be among only a handful of cities in the country to open the first cooperative craft brewery, and is brewing up several rich and tasty incentives to attract 300 new member/owners and investors to make that happen. Without more capital, the brewery will have to delay opening.
    The Los Alamos Beer Co-op (LABC) estimates that the future brewery will open its new location early in 2015. With 300 more memberships in the next few months, the Co-op hopes to hire a professional brewer and eventually produce four varieties of beer, along with root beer and cider.
    A co-op brewery is different from traditional breweries in that members own part of the business. Therefore, each member has the power to vote on how the business should be run, what types of beers should be offered, and other decisions which independently-owned craft breweries don’t allow anyone other than the owners to make. Unlike traditional breweries, any revenue has to be reinvested or returned to the members/owners.
    There are currently only three co-op breweries in the country and the idea is fast becoming the preferred business model for startup breweries who are tapping their communities for the funds and sweat equity it takes to get the brewery off the ground.

  • No one wants to see another mega fire like Las Conchas tear through New Mexico, and prescribed burning, when done safely and properly, can go a long way toward preventing such fires.
    But in order to be safer in fighting wildfires, firefighters need to receive certain qualifications, and there is a growing concern that there will not be enough qualified firefighters within 10 years.
    In response, organizations around the country are conducting Prescribed Fire Training Exchanges (TREX). Ecologist and PEEC board member Karla Sartor is fresh off the lines of a two-week, bilingual TREX in the Santa Fe National Forest and Valles Caldera National Monument. Sartor will introduce this topic at the next Nature on Tap, which will be 5:30 p.m. Thursday at the Manhattan Project Restaurant.
    Nature on Tap, hosted by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is part of an informal discussion series started by the Los Alamos Creative District.
    Each month a different topic about nature is introduced by a facilitator, and then the topic is opened up to the group for informal discussion.
    The fourth Spanish-language international prescribed training exchange wrapped up its work burning and learning on and around the Santa Fe National Forest and Valles Caldera National Monument last month.

  • Today
    The Los Alamos Photo Club (LAPC) meets from 7-9 p.m., the third Tuesday of each month, upstairs in Fuller Lodge Art Center. The focus of LAPC is photography in general. LAPC normally has one or two field trips per year and occasionally sponsors workshops and classes. All are welcome. For more information email Doug at dfcoombs@comcast.net.

    Public meeting for Hilltop Garden. 6:30 p.m. at the Y-Express. David Clark, the Y employee chosen to head the garden project, is looking for members of the community that can bring skills to the planning process. For more information email dclark@laymca.org, laymca.org/, or visit the Facebook page.

    LAHS Dance program students and Ballroom dance teacher Mrs. Natasha Barkhudarova will be teaching four weeks of Tango lessons. 7-8 p.m. at the LAHS ’Topper Theater, also known as the Black Box. Adults $40; students/teachers, $20 (for four weekly one-hour classes). Drop-in rate for adults $12; students/teachers, $6 (per class). Proceeds go to the dance program.

    Tradition and Change in Córdova, New Mexico: The 1939 Photographs of Berlyn Brixner & The López Family of Wood Carvers. Daily in the changing exhibit space in the Los Alamos History Museum through October.

  • If you know me even remotely well, you know I love to celebrate even the smallest of occasions. It might be custodian day, bosses day, boo buddies, it doesn’t matter. There is always a reason to celebrate the good things in life.
    This week we arrive at bus safety week and we tip our hat to bus drivers everywhere.
    I particularly salute the school bus drivers who deserve our thanks, and appreciation more than once a year.
    When I was a schoolgirl, my bus driver gave me my first job. She even made me my first pair of overalls, in the most delightful shade of blueberry. Sandy was her name and she played a major role in my childhood.
    Does anyone ever believe they might have that sort of impact on someone?
    My kids didn’t really ride a bus until middle school, but it was, “bus driver Bill,” who drove the special Chamisa Elementary bus. He allowed my kids to climb aboard so they could see what it was like.
    There was Mr. K, Steve O and now, forgive me for not yet knowing names, but the drivers of 137 in the morning and 117, 138 and 139 in the afternoon. I promise to report those names to you next week.
    Now for another of my favorites, how about the idea that someone drove a bus for 25 years! One of my neighbors, Ollie Bergauer drove a bus for Los Alamos Public Schools for 25 years.

  • The Los Alamos Community Winds with Conductor Ted Vives, have achieved third place in the community band division of the national The American Prize competition. The band was selected from applications reviewed during the summer from all across the United States.
    The American Prize is a series of new, nonprofit, competitions unique in scope and structure, designed to recognize and reward the best performing artists, ensembles and composers in the United States based on submitted recordings. The American Prize was founded in 2009 and is awarded annually in many areas of the performing arts.
    The Community Winds offered the following autobiographical sketch:
    “The Los Alamos Community Winds is a wind ensemble made up of members of the Los Alamos community. We comprise both amateur and professional musicians of all ages and backgrounds from middle and high school students to retirees in our area. The first performances of a concert band in Los Alamos were noted in newsletters from 1946. Activities over the years have included many weekly summer concerts as well as performing at various civic functions such as the 4th of July fireworks celebrations.”
    Among the goals are:
    1. To provide the Los Alamos community with a quality performing ensemble specializing in the best literature for the concert band and wind ensemble.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Dantez — A young, neutered, male gray and white cat who lost his left eye in an accident at the shelter. He gets around just fine and is accepting gentle visitors. He loves to be petted and he enjoys his best friend Jay.
    Hobbes — A 5-month-old, neutered, male, tabby kitten who will be available for adoption after his immunizations on Oct. 16. He is very friendly and playful.

  • Oct. 19-25, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m. Cardio
    10:30 a.m. Feldenkreis class
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Pork Chop
    1 p.m. Matter of Balance class
    7 p.m. Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m. Mac users group
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    10 a.m. Computer users group
    11:30 Lunch: Green chile chicken tortellini soup
    Noon Lunch talk: Jonathan Ice, Commission for the Blind
    1 p.m. Bingo
    1 p.m. MindBody massage
    6 p.m. Mahjong
    7 p.m. Bridge
    7:30 p.m. Table tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m. LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m. Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m. Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Catfish
    1:30 p.m. Daytime duplicate bridge

    THURSDAY
    8:30 a.m. Walk-In-The-Woods
    8:45 a.m. Variety training
    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1:30 p.m. Beginning tap dancing
    2 p.m. Ballroom dancing
    6:30 p.m. Chess
    7 p.m. Bridge

  • Today
    Mountain Elementary Halloween Carnival. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Weather permitting, game booths will be outdoors on the upper playground. Festivities include the haunted house, book fair, cake walk, face painting, game booths and prizes. Tickets are $5 for 20; games are three tickets each, cake walk is four tickets and haunted house is five. All proceeds benefit the students of Mountain School through the PTA.

    Tradition and Change in Córdova, New Mexico: The 1939 Photographs of Berlyn Brixner & The López Family of Wood Carvers. Daily in the changing exhibit space in the Los Alamos History Museum through October.

    “Masquerade.” Daily through Nov. 15 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center.
    Saturday
    The Annual Jemez Trail Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. along N.M. 4. Take a four-mile detour at Mile Marker 27 and just follow the signs. Many yard sale items at the barn area plus meet the alpacas and dogs at Aspen Ridge Alpacas on Thompson Ridge. Alpacas will be for sale. Do not bring own dogs. For more information call Mickey and Evelyn at 575-829-3312.

    Fuller Lodge Art Center’s 37th Annual Juired “Gateway to the Holidays” Arts & Crafts Fair. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.