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Today's Features

  • Father Theophan and parishioner Emrys Tennessen, of Saint Job of Pochaiv Orthodox Church in Los Alamos traveled Wednesday to Alamosa, Colorado to rendezvous with Jordanna Lynch Perry of the Archangel Michael Orthodox Church in Pueblo, Colorado to receive the flame which originated this year in Jerusalem on Pascha night.
    They also stopped at the Monastery of the Holy Archangel Michael in Canones, New Mexico, on their way home, to pass the fire to the brothers there.
    The Holy Fire is a miracle that occurs on the eve of Pascha each year. At the appointed time, the Patriarch of Jerusalem enters the Holy Sepulcher where Jesus Christ was buried for three days, without any fire-making implements and unlit candles.
    There he waits for the Holy Fire to descend and ignite the candles, after which he emerges from the sepulcher and the fire is passed to the faithful.
    Lamps lit from this fire are sent all over the world to Orthodox churches. This year is the first time a concerted effort was made to make it available in the United States.
    Over the past three weeks it has spread, person to person, parish to parish, all across the country, and now to Los Alamos.

  • BY ANN LEPAGE
    Special to the Monitor

  • The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    The Museum of International Folk Art will host the national touring exhibition Quilts of Southwest China, beginning July 9 through Jan. 21, 2018. While both highly valued and culturally significant, Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, and museums and little is known about them outside of the communities that make them. Works featured in the exhibition come from the collections of MOIFA, MSUM, the partnering Chinese museums and private lenders. A new bilingual publication (in English and Mandarin) accompanies the exhibition. Museum location is 706 Camino Lejo.

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Reel Deal Theater will show “Racing Extinction,” an undercover documentary exposing the hidden world of endangered species and the race to protect them from mass extinction, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    This film is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, students and children. Tickets are available at the Reel Deal Theater.
    Produced by Oceanic Preservation Society, the group behind the Academy Award®-winning film The Cove, Racing Extinction brings a voice to the thousands of species teetering on the very edge of life. This highly charged, impassioned collective of activists sets out to expose the two major threats to endangered wild species across the globe. The first comes from the international wildlife trade, and the medicinal “cures” and tonics that are marketed to the public at the expense of rare creatures. The second threat is carbon emissions and acidified oceans that are incompatible with existing animal life. Both threats are made clear in “Racing Extinction” through investigative reporting, undercover photography and covert operations.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Russ Gordon has released his list for the upcoming 2017 that promises to be his “best series yet.” This year will be his 28th year, and his last.
    The free concerts are Fridays in Los Alamos from May 19 through Sept. 8. Shows are from 7- 10 p.m. Bring your lawn chairs.
    The tentative lineup is:
    May 19: Chuchito Valdes Afro-Cuban jazz from Havana, Cuba and Cancun, Mexico. Master of Cuban music including Son, Danzon, Cuban Timba and Guaguanco. Los Alamos Kite Festival Night.
    May 26: Deke Dickerson. Alt-Indie Rock, Retro Swing, Rockabilly Revival, Roots-Rock, Hillbilly, Surf, Jump Blues and instrumental rock. The King of the Geek Guitar! From Los Angeles.
    June 2: The Coral Creek Band. Americana/Country Rock, bluegrass, Cajun, fol and Island rock from Colorado. Some of the musicians and friends of Leftover Salmon, Yonder Mountain string Band and Railroad Earth.
    June 9: Western Centuries Alt./Country-rock, with early R&B, Honky-Tonk twang. Reminiscent of the classic country rock bands like The Band, Flying Burrito Brothers and The Byrds. Los Alamos Chamber Fest Night.
    June 16: The Red Elvises. Russian Rock ‘n’ Roll and Siberian Surf Rok. From Moscow and Santa Monica, California. Los Alamos’s favorite Rock ‘n’ Roll band!! LA Daily Post night.

  • The University of New Mexico’s Institute for Medieval Studies will host its 32nd Spring Lecture Series, “Medieval Animals,” April 24–27, popular with Los Alamos and other area residents, all of whom are welcome to attend.
    “Medieval Animals” will explore how humans and animals interacted on the historical level at key points during the Middle Ages. The topics will include how medieval authors – much like their modern counterparts, including George Orwell and Jorge Luis Borges – used animal characters to critique human behavior and underline human foibles.
    The lectures will also cover how legends grew up around animals both real and mythical in order to offer men and women moral examples that accorded with the medieval worldview, and how the extraordinarily rich representation of animals in medieval art played both a didactic and a decorative role in the culture of the Middle Ages.
    An underlying theme of the series will be to compare and contrast the treatment of animals within medieval Western and Islamic cultures.

  • Author Judy Hochberg lived in Los Alamos from 1989 to 2000 and recently published a book about Spanish with Bloomsbury Academic Press. Hochberg has a Ph.D. in linguistics from Stanford University and teaches Spanish at Fordham University, New York.
    Although she has not been back to Los Alamos since she moved, the delicious breakfast burritos from Chili Works have not been forgotten.
    Hochberg worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a research staff member with CCS-3 Information Sciences, working mostly on projects having to do with computers and language.
    The project she was hired for involved training a neural net, which is a computer model loosely based on the workings of the brain, to make an association between the acoustics of speech and the movement of the lips and tongue.
    Hochberg explained, “The idea was that this would sort of make speech visible and people who had hearing problems would be able to use this as a way to teach them how to articulate.”
    Another project at LANL that utilized her linguistic skills was developing a program that would automatically identify the writing system used in a document, whether it was printed or hand written. “Of all the papers I published at the lab, those are the ones that get most cited,” she recalled.

  • Over 100 people attended the annual University of New Mexico-Los Alamos job fair, an event that attracts more and more visitors each year.
    “It’s become an annual event and we were able to get our press to the media quickly this year,” UNM-LA Student Advisor Grace Willerton said.
    Willerton has been organizing the job fair for three to four years, but the job fair was actually started several years before that through a grant by another organizer. Willerton was happy to take up the mantle.
    “When I took over that program, I really felt like it was valuable to continue that just for our student’s experience just to understand how to approach employers before they graduate,” Willerton said.
    Isabella Stevens, 16, was one of those people. She came to the fair looking for something that would fit with her schedule.
    “I don’t know yet… maybe something with the county or something like that,” she said.
    The job fair is also one of the ways UNM-LA connects with the community while adding to its own value as a community member.
    “There’s a lot of people looking for part-time workers, student employees, this is a really nice way to bridge those,” Willerton said.

  • Have you ever wondered what goes on in the life of a busy bee? The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offers a workshop with Dorothy Brown at the Los Alamos Nature Center about the biology and colony dynamics of honeybees from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday.
    This will be a great introduction for anyone curious about these non-native pollinators.
    What is happening inside the seemingly crowded honeybee colonies? Dorothy Brown will discuss the three castes of honeybee and how they contribute to the super-organism called the colony.
    Participants will take a journey through the hive and learn all about the complexities that make a colony work. This workshop is perfect for those considering starting to keep bees.
    Brown started Langstroth beekeeping in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York in 1974. She later kept some colonies in the Bay Area of Northern California. In 2006, she and Kate Whealen both took the Ecoversity class in topbar beekeeping taught by Les Crowder. She has a degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University and keeps a topbar colony on her carport roof in Los Alamos.
    Registration is required for this program, and is available at peecnature.org or by calling 662-0460. The cost is $8 for PEEC members and $10 for non-members.