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Today's Features

  • Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Climate and Ecosystem Science Team director Cathy Wilson will speak Thursday at Science On Tap, at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square.
    Wilson is working to better understand what happens when warming climate causes Arctic permafrost to thaw. As the ground warms up, previously frozen soil carbon is decomposed and released as green house gases – adding to global warming. But, in turn, warmer temperatures drive more plant growth and carbon uptake from the atmosphere. This might offset permafrost carbon emissions, but by how much?
    Come and learn about the complex interactions that take place in these normally frozen reaches of our planet.
    Science On Tap is sponsored by the Los Alamos Creative District and hosted by the Bradbury Science Museum. The On Tap series begins each evening with an informal 10-15 minute lecture followed by a lively group discussion. All ages are welcome. The “On Tap” series happens twice a month. The discussions are supported by Bradbury Science Museum, Fuller Lodge Art Center, Los Alamos Historical Society and PEEC at The Nature Center.

  • Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, it’s May!
    That’s right, anything between now and May 31 that comes across as ridiculous or awkward in the form of a question, an attitude, a lapse in goal accomplishment or general insanity, the answer is it’s May.
    I would like for everyone within eyeshot to try and enjoy the next two weeks and find positivity somewhere throughout the day.
    If I don’t address it again before the final school bell rings, reading over the summer is so important. Los Alamos Middle School Librarian Lisa LaPrairie-Whitacre taught me when she was still the Chamisa Elementary Librarian the equal importance of listening to books on tape too.
    So recently while spending way too much time in a car, I went to our public libraries and checked out several audiobooks to learn more about various people that might seem fun or inspirational.
    The first book on CD I checked out was, Dick Van Dyke’s “Keep Moving and other Tips and Truths about Aging.” It is read by the author and was quite a treat to enjoy. I think kids and adults need to hear stories of being knocked down, picking themselves up and going forward.
    Many of our national and local treasures for that matter have so much wisdom to share if we just take the time to listen.

  • Some dogs are born blind while others develop blindness over time from age and disease. No matter the situation, blind dogs are just as loveable and playful as dogs with excellent eyesight. Dr. Lucien Vallone, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, cleared up some confusion about caring for blind dogs.
    “Blind dogs are certainly adoptable,” Vallone said. “In fact, most blind dogs’ owners actually report that their dog’s quality of life is excellent. In addition, many owners find that blind dogs become more attached to either the owner or other pets within the household, which is often viewed positively. After adapting to a new environment, which can take several months, most blind dogs lead lives that are almost identical to sighted dogs.”

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    BUNNIES
    While the Los Alamos animal shelter does not typically take bunnies, a small bunny was dropped off a little while ago and went immediately into foster care. Little Bunny is a cute little black bunny that has been litter box trained and is allowed to roam free in the house. She gets along well with another male bunny in the house, but the female bunny is very jealous. Little Bunny is very friendly, especially when she’s hungry, and will sit in a lap for an hour or so at a time. She loves romaine lettuce, carrots, hay, and rabbit food!
    CATS

  • TODAY
    Green Hour Hike at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join other families for a kid-centered hike. Free.

    Members of the Laboratory Retiree Group (LRG) Annual Meeting from 4-7 p.m. at the Hot Rocks Java Cafe, 4200 West Jemez Road. Contact sgirard@losalamos.com for more information.

    Hiking 101 from 6:30-8 p.m. at Nature Center. Discover how to confidently and comfortably hike our trails with expert Craig Martin and Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation. Cost is $15 for non-members and $12 for PEEC members.
    THURSDAY
    The Los Alamos Genealogical Association will meet at 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in Los Alamos. Eowyn Langholf from Albuquerque will speak about “A Gentle Introduction to Social Media and Genealogy.” The traditional no-host dinner will be at 5:30 p.m. at China Moon before the meeting.

    Nature Yoga at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga at the nature center with Christa Tyson, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-member and $12 for PEEC members. More information at peecnature.org.
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • This week, a reminder to the parents of seniors, the next few weeks is about to travel at warp speed.
    Try to stop down during the next several weeks and take it all in slowly. Sure I know, there are a hundred things to do, last performances, awards ceremonies and senior activities, but slowly apply the brakes when you can do it without stopping down.
    OK, I even encourage stopping down. When practice and games and homework all step in and take over, reign in a day or two during the week the reconvene a meal at the dinner table.
    On a weekend morning, make some pancakes, bake some cinnamon rolls or swing by the store early for some fancy doughnuts. You can break out the chocolate milk, spring for some of those take and go Starbucks drinks or make some hot chocolate.
    Open the house to friends during this time, stock up on snacks, movies or games and then sit in an adjoining room and relish the chatter and commentary. We may even forgo the traditional graduation party for an all-out friend event with a new PlayStation game, some Redbox movies and final gathering of their friends.

  • Local Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, and Venture Scouts are prepared to help the Letter Carriers and LA Cares to collect, sort and store food donations and supplies during the 24th annual National Food Drive sponsored by the Letter Carriers on Saturday.
    It may be surprising to learn that even in Los Alamos, there are dozens of families, many with young children or elderly, who need help, in addition to those in neighboring communities.
    To help, the scouts ask residents to fill a grocery bag (double it for strength) or a box with non-perishable food and other necessities. Then, on Saturday morning, place it near their mailboxes and letter carrier, a Boy Scout or an adult leader will pick it up and take it to be sorted, stored and distributed by LA Cares.    
    Here are suggestions for donations:
     Macaroni and cheese, 100 percent juices in half-gallon plastic, canned fruits and vegetables, boxed  mashed potatoes, low-fat/salt canned meats. No glass containers.

  • Gordon McDonough, well known artist and educator at the Bradbury Science Museum, offered to create a donation box for the new Los Alamos County Nature Center, and it has now arrived, ready to enchant all donors.
    When visitors slide your dollar bill into the slot, a light flashes to check that it’s a bill, not a piece of paper. Then the fun begins. An acorn woodpecker may tap on a tree, an Abert’s squirrel may swish his tail, a bobcat may stick his head up, or a pika may pop out.  
    Even more intriguing, people can look at the mechanisms that trigger the action; they’re visible below the money box, with hand-made wooden gears turning as they produce the action above.  
    In discussing ideas for the donation box with McDonough, PEEC mentioned these four iconic creatures of the Pajarito Plateau and hoped he’d figure out a way to use one. When he came through with all four, the staff was amazed. 

  • The North Mesa Dog Park will be closed for the installation of a new irrigation system and new fencing to extend the park and also to include a small dog area. The park will be closed through Friday.  
    The county expects to open the park for the weekend.  For information call the parks superintendent, Jeff Humpton, at 662-8159.

  • Business After Hours is a monthly after-work-hours social that promotes interaction, friendship,  and identification of business opportunities.
    The Business After Hours will at 5:30–7 p.m. Wednesday at Los Alamos Medical Center, 3917 West Road, under the canopy on the canyon side of LAMC.
    This will be a community collaboration celebration catered by Blue Window Bistro.
    Come help LAMC celebrate National Hospital Week, 64 years in Los Alamos and meet and greet local non profits.
    There will be prizes and give-aways. Attendees can also visit with LAMC physicians.
    Register online at losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/details/business-after-hours-may-2016-145.