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Today's Features

  • The Authors Speak series of lectures continues Thursday at 7 p.m. in the Upstairs Rotunda at Mesa Public Library with author Stephen F. Ledoux, who will talk about his book “Beautiful Sights and Sensations.”

    With this book, Ledoux shares his passion for beautiful objects. Ledoux, who is also an expert in the emerging natural science of behaviorology, has travelled and taught extensively. He has held positions in Australia and in China, as well as at the State University of New York at Canton.

    He and his wife Nelly Case, also an author, now make their home in Los Alamos. Throughout his travels Ledoux has sought out and enjoyed beautiful objects, often made by natives of whichever region he is visiting. He writes about the sensations that drew him to collect, and also the sights that have inspired him.

    “Beyond my own photographic art, these (collections) have focused on some Native American arts, particularly from the Southwest, along with Japanese woodblock prints, Chinese paintings, custom knives and other edged art,” Ledoux writes in his backstory at the start of the book.

  • I hope you won’t mind one more column on our adventures to praise the great people in our community.
    Kudos Piñon Park Pool, a free community swim, friendly staff free pool toys to borrow.

    Next was the first lemonade stand for three little girls when LAPD Officer Gallegos stopped by for a visit. While the girls were elated to have a man in blue because lemonade was free for firemen and police officers, he wanted to pay.

    He proceeded to give the girls free stickers and asked them to display them proudly just if any fire fighters did stop too.

    The next event with Kiwanis at PEEC had free smores, campfire stories and songs. Joy brought the excitement as the head campfire girl with her lovely daughter standing outside with their mouths open wide and belting out songs about lemon drops and gum drops.

    Our next creator of fun is Mesa Public Librarian Angelina Manfredi. While I would love to write an entire article just about

    Angie, I’m forced to highlight her goodness in just a paragraph or two.

    Manfredi and her Women of White Rock (WOW) held an event that we stumbled upon, a stuffed animal sleep over at the library!

  • NEW YORK (AP) — John Mayer never relied on multicolored lighting, confetti and pyrotechnics to help him during his live shows, like some of his peers.

    But the singer-songwriter-guitarist wanted to step up his game, and he said watching Drake perform live encouraged him to beef up his stage production and take more risks during his concerts.

    Mayer will launch the second leg of his Search for Everything World Tour on Tuesday in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The new live shows have been a departure for the Grammy winner, who now performs with a colorful and futuristic L.E.D. wall and floor.

    "I wanted to have a really big show. I want to be competitive. I want to be in the world where people are creating bigger and better shows," Mayer said. "I think there's a healthy competition involved in it. I went and saw Drake's show and ... real artists say, 'Wow!' And then they go, '(Expletive).' Right? Because you see something that wows you and as an artist yourself you go, 'I want a little of that.'"

    The 39-year-old recently wrapped a tour with Dead & Company, his supergroup with Grateful Dead's Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann and Bob Weir. His summer tour wraps Sept. 3 in Noblesville, Indiana.

  • It’s time for all riders to showcase their equestrian talents in Western and English categories at the annual Los Alamos County Horse Show at Brewer Arena July 22, starting at 9 a.m.
    The Los Alamos County Horse Show offers four age categories (ages 9 and under), 10–13, 14–18 and adult, and many different horsemanship class categories.
    The fees range from $5 per youth class entry, $8 per adult class entry, and $30 per family (four or more participants from immediate family living in the same household).
    Prizes include place ribbons, horse show t-shirts and buckles.
    Pre-registration is through at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Submit forms to the Parks, Recreation’s Administrative offices at the Aquatic Center.
    For more information, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • The Los Alamos Mountaineers will meet at 6:45 p.m. July 25 at the Los Alamos Nature Center for a presentation by Rich Spritz, as he shares his experience recreating the Shackleton traverse.
    “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success,” Spritz said of the adventure.
    The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-17 was a Grand Failure, from which Sir Ernest Shackleton emerged as a great leader.
    Spritz took part in a National Geographic mini-expedition to recreate the historic Shackleton traverse of South Georgia for the 100th anniversary. Safe return doubtful.
    Social starts at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • The Military Order of the World Wars will meet Tuesday for its annual picnic.
    The meeting will be in the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack on North Mesa. (Note the change in location for this month’s meeting only.)
    This month’s speaker is Rick Wallace, Ph.D., who will discuss the astronomical significance of the sun, summer solstice and its resulting seasons. He will also talk about eclipses especially the one that will cross the United States on Aug. 21.
    The Posse Shack is on North Mesa Road. Take Diamond Drive east through the Golf Course and straight through the traffic circle and up the hill. Follow the road around for about one mile. The shack is on the left, and there is parking on both sides of the street.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The cost of the dinner is $25 per person.
    Call Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 for reservations. A reservation is a commitment to pay. Dinner is scheduled to be Smokin Bear BBQ with appropriate sides.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    The New Mexico Alzheimer’s Association will offer a one-hour session from 1-2 p.m. on July 17 in the lower level classroom of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The session will focus on the early stages of Alzheimer’s to include symptoms, coping strategies for caregivers and resources to help families who are challenged with dementia. For more information, contact David Davis 505-473-1297 or dldavis@alz.org.

    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    TUESDAY

  • Summer time in Texas means more time to play outside, go swimming, and soak up the sun. However, warmer temperatures also mean that pets may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. To help pet owners avoid these risks, Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight.
    “Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are major problems for pets in the summer, especially in short nosed breeds, such a pug or a bulldog,” Eckman said.  “These conditions can occur during hot and humid days and even cooler days, if your pets aren’t accustomed to the heat.”

    Heat exhaustion is the early stages of a heat stroke and causes lethargy, vomiting, and weakness. Following continued exercise or exposure to heat, Eckman said a heat stroke can occur with more severe signs, including extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and pale mucous membranes.  This can lead significant problems up to and including death if not recognized and treated immediately.

  • The Colorado River, one of the longest rivers in the United States, is gradually shrinking. This is partly a result of overuse by municipalities and seasonal drought. The other reason is global warming.

    The decline in the river reservoir will have serious implications for large U.S. cities, such as Los Angeles, that depend on the Colorado River as their water source. In addition, this will also have an impact on the Native American tribes who view the Colorado River as sacred to their religions.

    As Ka-Voka Jackson, a member of the Hualapai tribe and a graduate student working to address climate change on the Colorado River and restoring native plant species along its banks, stated, “The Colorado River is so sacred not just to my tribe, but to so many others.”

    As a scholar of Native American religions and the environment, I understand how indigenous people’s religions and sacred places are closely tied to their landscape. For the past 100 years, indigenous peoples have been forced to adapt to changes in their environments and modify their religious rituals in the United States. The U.S. government made certain Native American religious practices illegal in the 19th and early 20th century. Although these policies have since been rescinded, they led to changes in many indigenous practices.  

  • The Jemez Mountains Bear Paw Quilt Guild invites the community to their annual Quilt Show.
    Come see a dazzling display of quilts, including the Patriotic Fallen Warrior Quilts given to New Mexico families that have lost a soldier in the Middle East.
    A selection of quilts and handmade items will also be available for sale (cash only).
    Admission is free. The event takes place July 21-23. Friday and Saturday the show will run 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. On Sunday, the show will run 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. It takes place at the Walatowa Visitor Center, 7413 Hwy 4.