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Today's Features

  • Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA) announced their annual Spirit of the West winner, named for former county council member Jim West.
    Lois Eddleman has been volunteering for the Los Alamos County Fair for over 55 years.  
    Eddleman was nominated by Claire Swinhoe, who described Eddleman as someone with an energy level and stamina, which are amazing.  
    At the county fair each year, as well as helping secure the superintendents, volunteers and officials, she also provides food for the volunteers during the three days of fair. This year, she brought back her famous “sloppy Joe’s,” which are well known and enjoyed by all.  
    This year, she is also teaching more than 30 piano students, possibly connecting with thousands of Los Alamos children, their parents and siblings throughout the years.
    “I have great admiration and respect for her,” said Swinhoe. “Not least of all is the reason that she has been volunteering since 1961, but the fact that Lois is 91 years young.”
    Eddleman will receive a handcrafted award made by Richard Ronquillo.
    The Community Asset Awards was sponsored by Champions of Youth Ambitions and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation.
    Read more on all of the award nominees later this week.

  • TODAY
    Business After Hours from 5:30 - 7 p.m. at Rose Chocolatier, 149 Central Park Square. Get some ideas for Valentines Day. Drop your business card in the bowl for a drawing for a door prize from Flowers by Gillian.
    THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 5:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members. More information at peecnature.org.

    Backcountry Film Festival at 7 p.m. Join us for an evening of inspiring and entertaining short films along with prizes and fun. Cost is $12 in advance, $15 at the door.

    Topper Review 2017 at 7 p.m. for a preview at Duane Smith Auditorium. Do you like singing, dancing, and bad jokes? Then do we have the show for you. Come to the Topper Revue experience of a lifetime. Watch as dozens of acts from all across the land perform Topper Revue 2017 at the Duane Smith Auditorium from January 26-28. Starting at 7 p.m. for a preview, and for a performance Friday and Saturday, and a matinee Saturday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $7 for students and seniors and $10 for adults. Student tickets for the matinee and all tickets for the preview are $5.
    FRIDAY

  • The Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice program is holding its annual “Daffodils for Hospice” sale.
    Proceeds from the sale will support the Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service Hospice program for terminally ill people.
    Daffodil pre-orders are being taken now through March 3.
    People can order the following items:  
    • A single bunch (10 stems) for $5
    • A small glass vase with single bunch for $10
    • A small glass vase with two bunches (20 stems) for $15
    •A large glass vase with three bunches (30 stems) $20.
    Delivery is free with any $10 minimum order to a single address.
    Flowers will be delivered March 11 or customers can pick them the orders up at “Daffodil Central” (call LAVNS for location in Central Park Square) from 8 a.m.-5:30 p.m. March 9 and 10.
    Watch for location sales at Los Alamos National Bank, both Smith’s grocery stores, Pig + Fig bakery and café, Uli’s Clothing Boutique and the Betty Ehart Senior Center March 9 and 10.
    The sale is sponsored in part by Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico and Walmart.
    Anyone who would like to place an order, can call Los Alamos Visiting Nurse Service (the only local hospice) at 662-2525 or order online at lavns.com.

  • The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • Parents of incoming students are encouraged to attend the upcoming Kindergarten Round-Up Wednesday at all Los Alamos elementary schools. Children who turn 5 years old by Sept. 1 are eligible to be enrolled in kindergarten for the 2017-2018 school year.  
    Kindergarten Round-Up is an important step in the pre-registration process for parents and students alike, as it gives them an idea of what to expect for their first year of elementary school.
    Parents and their children will get the opportunity to meet teachers, principals and other key school personnel.  
    The soon-to-be kindergartners also have the chance to visit a classroom in order to become familiar with the learning environment and the teaching materials used throughout the school year.
    Parents can call the school in which they are zoned for further questions regarding Kindergarten Round-Up.  
    The first day of school is Aug. 17.
    The contact numbers are: Aspen, 663-2275; Barranca Mesa, 663-2730; Chamisa, 663-2470; Mountain, 663-2325; and Piñon, 663-2680.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club will host nationally renowned equestrian trainer and instructor Robert Taylor over the weekend of April 8-9.
    Community members are welcome to come and observe the event or participate in the mounted activities.
    Taylor, of TaylorMade Stables in Maryland (taylormadestables.com/robert-taylor.html), will be in town to coach show jumping and mounted games competitors of all levels. This has become an annual event for local riders, who greatly enjoy Taylor’s gruff humor and superb training skills.
    Taylor has been a fixture in the show jumping, competitive driving, foxhunting and mounted games communities internationally for many years, and his daughter Mackenzie won the International Mounted Games Association World individual Championship under-17 in 2012.
    Morning sessions for the Los Alamos clinic will be at the jump arena (behind the main rodeo facility), and focus on jumping skills for horse and rider, and then each afternoon the club will set up for mounted games practice.
    Mounted games participants can sign up to participate even on the same day of the clinic. Both English and Western tack is permitted, as long as everyone has helmets and boots.
    Audience members are welcome at no charge, but are asked to leave dogs at home or keep them leashed at all times for safety.

  • Easter is one of the most important days of the year for Christians. Easter Sunday is filled with symbolism and tradition, some of which harken back to early Christianity, while others trace their origins to paganism.
    The Easter Bunny and Easter eggs are two Easter traditions with less extensive histories. The Easter Bunny, according to sources including History.com, first arrived in America in the 1700s via German settlers who brought with them their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase.” Children would make nests where the rabbit could lay its colored eggs. Eventually, the custom spread from Pennsylvania, where many German immigrants settled, to other areas around the country.
    Eggs are symbolic of new life and rebirth in many cultures. To Christians, eggs represent the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
    Another theory suggests that Christians were once forbidden to eat during the Lenten season preceding Easter. Therefore, Christians would paint and decorate eggs for Easter to mark the joyous celebration and cessation of penance and fasting.
    Even though these traditions have endured, Easter eggs themselves might not be so strong. This year, Easter celebrants may want to experiment with different materials that are more forgiving and more enduring than standard eggs.
    Wooden eggs

  • Volunteers from the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will form a Circle of Love Saturday morning, as they prepare to leave for Puerto Penasco, Mexico, to build homes for the poor.
    The 50-plus-member team will build for three families this week, including a 78-year-old mother and her daughter that make $35 a week, a five-member family that makes $42 a week and a six-member family that makes $170 a week.
    As they do a formal key ceremony of Friday for each family, giving them the keys to their first real home, the team tells each family that the house is a gift and they owe them nothing for their work.
    The team will arrive back in Los Alamos Saturday night.

  • This week, I feel like the column should be called, “It’s all about me,” and “It’s not about me at all.”
    Today starts the long, slow crawl to 50, and the previous year and a half has been a stressful time, to say the least.
    It has been a time to see what you’re made of, grab the bull by the horns and hold on for the ride.
    I’ve always had friends with children a year or two older than our children.
    I highly recommend it, because these little nuggets of wisdom can be stored, like a squirrel stores nuts and pulled out when you really need them.
    So the same might be true of having a friend that is a few years older than you. Perhaps it will help you see what’s ahead and perhaps at the same time, you don’t want to know.
    I had a friend that had already hit the magic age of 50. She had some health problems, but was battling through along the way.
    Then unexpectedly, she died in her sleep. Yep, 50 years old and gone overnight.
    My heart aches for her husband, because he’s just slightly younger than my husband and his life has been uprooted in a flash.