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Today's Features

  • Getting a new puppy, kitten, or older cat or dog is an exciting experience, but having pets comes with certain responsibilities, including potty training. It may be a time-consuming process to potty train your pet, but Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said it is necessary to develop a long-lasting, positive relationship with your pet.
    “Inappropriate eliminations are one of the biggest reasons pets are surrendered,” Stickney said. “Developing good bathroom habits early is key to having a pet you will enjoy for a long time.”
    Potty training should begin as soon as you bring your pet home. If you’re training an adult dog or a puppy, be sure to give them plenty of time to use the bathroom and stay with them until they go. Then, reward the animal with a treat or positive praise so they understand that eliminating outside is good behavior.
    If you’re training a kitten or cat, Stickney said finding a litter box that your pet is comfortable getting in and out of is key. Additionally, if your kitten was using a litter box before it came to live with you, it could be helpful to start potty training your pet with that specific litter.

  • The next Family Night at the Los Alamos Nature Center is Oct. 10.

    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey from 6-7 p.m. The Nature Center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.

    This October’s Family Night will be the last of the season to have a campfire and make s’mores, one of the most popular features of warm-weather Family Nights.

    And mark your calendars – the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center.

    Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. Next month’s Family Night will take place on Nov. 14.

    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • The public is invited to join the Los Alamos Family YMCA for a panel discussion on “Attracting and Nurturing Volunteers: A Conversation,” from 5-6 p.m. Oct. 19 at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos in the Lecture Hall, building 2.

    The discussion will be led by Diana Martinez, of the Los Alamos Family YMCA, and Todd Nickols, of the Los Alamos Historical Society.

    These are leaders of two local organizations with robust volunteer programs. The speakers will discuss the joys (and pains) of engaging the community in nonprofit efforts. Among the topics will be:

    • How to recruit and retain volunteers for your organization

    • Different ways to recognize the work of your volunteers

    • Identify resources for developing or strengthening your own volunteer program

    • How to engage youth volunteers

    • Recruiting volunteers to help with programming

    • Preparing for group volunteer activities.

    Martinez and Nickols will begin the discussion with their experiences and insights, but they hope to engage the audience with their questions and comments.

    Bring ideas and questions regarding this lifeblood of any nonprofit organization.

  • No doubt about it, Whiskers likes to be top dog, even though he’s a cat. This is according to volunteers at the Los Alamos Animal Shelter, where Whiskers currently resides.  
    Whiskers, who is about 4-years-old, doesn’t like to be around other cats. Adult cats maybe, but he tends to bully kittens. He loves humans, though, and he is on the hunt for his forever home.
    His previous owner had to give him up, as Whiskers couldn’t live in an assisted living facility. Whiskers is an American Shorthair with orange-and-white markings. If adopted, Whiskers is guaranteed to shower his new owner with all the attention they give him back.
     He’s neutered and chipped.
    Whiskers has had all his shots, and is negative for the FeLV-FIV virus. He does have one awesome medical anomaly though, he has a bent tail. It doesn’t seem to bother him, and he seems to be rather proud of it. For more information, call the shelter at 505-662-8179 or email the shelter at police-psa@lacnm.us.
    Photo By Paulina Gwaltney Photography, (910) 333-6362, Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • Fans of the popular television show “The Walking Dead” know that the show follows a group of people trying to survive a postapocalyptic world dominated by reanimated dead humans who feed on the flesh of other living creatures. While they’re referred to as “walkers” by everyone on the show, viewers are led to believe these creatures are “zombies.”
    Zombies have long been a subject of horror movies, video games and scary tales. Zombies are believed to be corpses without souls who have been reanimated through supernatural means. Unbeknownst to many, the lumbering undead on the search for fresh brains that makes up the contemporary zombie characterization actually trace their roots to the Caribbean.
    Some speculate the word “zombie” was derived from West African languages. The Oxford English Dictionary says “zombie” is a word that was first recorded in English in 1819. It is related to words zumbi, meaning “fetish,” and nzambi meaning, “a god.”

  • The Los Alamos Arts Council and Los Alamos County and many arts groups in the area will celebrate National Month of Arts and Culture with an Evening of Arts and Culture Oct. 13.

    The three-hour tour of the Arts District will be from 6-9 p.m. and include performers, artists, poets and others. There will be short programs in nine venues within the Arts District.

    Patrons can pick up a program card – a guide to who is doing what, where and when – from an information booth at Fuller Lodge, or at any of the nine venues, then walk to each venue enjoying the arts diversity of Los Alamos.

    This will be a way to celebrate local arts creativity and cultural diversity. There is no admission fee to experience the Evening of Arts and Culture, thanks to the generous support of all participating groups and the sponsors.

  • Join Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium curator Chick Keller at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 2 for an easy walk to identify local wildflower species. It is free to attend the last Wildflower Walk of the season, and no advance registration is required.

    You won’t want to miss the last Wildflower Walk of the year.

    Participants receive a plant list that, along with instruction from Keller, will help them learn how to identify the late blooming wildflowers in Los Alamos.

    The group will meet at 5:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, to carpool to the trailhead.

    For more information, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Enjoy Bandelier - And Other Public Lands - With No Entrance Fee on National Public Lands Day
    Often just known as National Public Lands Day is generally billled as the nation’s largest single-day volunteer effort for public lands.

    On this day, thousands of people do volunteer work such as trail maintenance and litter pickup, while others make a special point of taking the day to enjoy the public lands that belong to everyone. To celebrate this special day, many federal lands, and some state parks as well, offer free admission. 

    This year in New Mexico, volunteer opportunities are as diverse as trail work projects on the Santa Fe and Lincoln National Forests (U.S. Forest Service), tagging monarch butterflies at the Bosque Del Apache Wildlife Refuge (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service) and work projects on the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument (Bureau of Land Management) and at Cochiti Lake (Army Corps of Engineers).

    At Bandelier National Monument (National Park Service), no work projects are planned this year, and the emphasis is on exploring and enjoying this treasured part of the Jemez Mountains. No entrance fees will be collected that day. The bookstore will have everything on 15-percent discount.

  • WASHINGTON — In a quest to end cookie-cutter health care, U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact – and to finally customize ways to prevent and treat disease.

    Why does one sibling get sick but not another? Why does a drug cure one patient but only cause nasty side effects in the next?

    Finding out is a tall order. Today, diseases typically are treated based on what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients.

    “We depend on the average, the one-size-fits-all approach because it’s the best we’ve got,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

    That’s changing: The NIH’s massive “All Of Us” project will push what’s called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique in learning to forecast health and treat disease. Partly it’s genetics. What genes do you harbor that raise your risk of, say, heart disease or Type 2 diabetes or various cancers?

  • Love, romance, action and science fiction collide Saturday at Bandelier National Monument’s annual Opera on the Rocks event. Held at the Juniper Campground Amphitheater, this year’s presentation will be excerpts from Mozart’s “Abduction from the Seraglio,” done Star Trek style.

    “Though the opera’s trappings may be out of this world, Mozart’s memorable melodies remain intact. You really don’t have to be a Star Trek fan or an opera fan. As long as you enjoy a good laugh and some impressive singing, you’re going to have a really good time,” said the Pacific Opera Project, the original creator of the concept.

    Los Alamos’ own opera guild, Opera Alta, will be staging the event Saturday, with all the characters singing in German.

    Those looking to go can still purchase tickets at guildsofsfo.org. Those attending are encouraged to bring a jacket, warm clothing and dress as their favorite Star Trek character. Campers at the site are welcome to see the production too, ticket or no ticket. Food vendors include Sirphey, and beverages from Santa Fe Cider Works, Velarde and Gruet Winder and Black Mesa Winery.

    The opening act with by drumming by renowned musician Cochiti Pueblo resident Arnold Herrera.