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Today's Features

  • It’s time for all riders to showcase their equestrian talents in Western and English categories at the annual Los Alamos County Horse Show at Brewer Arena July 22, starting at 9 a.m.
    The Los Alamos County Horse Show offers four age categories (ages 9 and under), 10–13, 14–18 and adult, and many different horsemanship class categories.
    The fees range from $5 per youth class entry, $8 per adult class entry, and $30 per family (four or more participants from immediate family living in the same household).
    Prizes include place ribbons, horse show t-shirts and buckles.
    Pre-registration is through at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Submit forms to the Parks, Recreation’s Administrative offices at the Aquatic Center.
    For more information, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • The Los Alamos Mountaineers will meet at 6:45 p.m. July 25 at the Los Alamos Nature Center for a presentation by Rich Spritz, as he shares his experience recreating the Shackleton traverse.
    “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success,” Spritz said of the adventure.
    The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-17 was a Grand Failure, from which Sir Ernest Shackleton emerged as a great leader.
    Spritz took part in a National Geographic mini-expedition to recreate the historic Shackleton traverse of South Georgia for the 100th anniversary. Safe return doubtful.
    Social starts at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • The Military Order of the World Wars will meet Tuesday for its annual picnic.
    The meeting will be in the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack on North Mesa. (Note the change in location for this month’s meeting only.)
    This month’s speaker is Rick Wallace, Ph.D., who will discuss the astronomical significance of the sun, summer solstice and its resulting seasons. He will also talk about eclipses especially the one that will cross the United States on Aug. 21.
    The Posse Shack is on North Mesa Road. Take Diamond Drive east through the Golf Course and straight through the traffic circle and up the hill. Follow the road around for about one mile. The shack is on the left, and there is parking on both sides of the street.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The cost of the dinner is $25 per person.
    Call Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 for reservations. A reservation is a commitment to pay. Dinner is scheduled to be Smokin Bear BBQ with appropriate sides.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    The New Mexico Alzheimer’s Association will offer a one-hour session from 1-2 p.m. on July 17 in the lower level classroom of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The session will focus on the early stages of Alzheimer’s to include symptoms, coping strategies for caregivers and resources to help families who are challenged with dementia. For more information, contact David Davis 505-473-1297 or dldavis@alz.org.

    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    TUESDAY

  • Summer time in Texas means more time to play outside, go swimming, and soak up the sun. However, warmer temperatures also mean that pets may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. To help pet owners avoid these risks, Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight.
    “Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are major problems for pets in the summer, especially in short nosed breeds, such a pug or a bulldog,” Eckman said.  “These conditions can occur during hot and humid days and even cooler days, if your pets aren’t accustomed to the heat.”

    Heat exhaustion is the early stages of a heat stroke and causes lethargy, vomiting, and weakness. Following continued exercise or exposure to heat, Eckman said a heat stroke can occur with more severe signs, including extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and pale mucous membranes.  This can lead significant problems up to and including death if not recognized and treated immediately.

  • The Colorado River, one of the longest rivers in the United States, is gradually shrinking. This is partly a result of overuse by municipalities and seasonal drought. The other reason is global warming.

    The decline in the river reservoir will have serious implications for large U.S. cities, such as Los Angeles, that depend on the Colorado River as their water source. In addition, this will also have an impact on the Native American tribes who view the Colorado River as sacred to their religions.

    As Ka-Voka Jackson, a member of the Hualapai tribe and a graduate student working to address climate change on the Colorado River and restoring native plant species along its banks, stated, “The Colorado River is so sacred not just to my tribe, but to so many others.”

    As a scholar of Native American religions and the environment, I understand how indigenous people’s religions and sacred places are closely tied to their landscape. For the past 100 years, indigenous peoples have been forced to adapt to changes in their environments and modify their religious rituals in the United States. The U.S. government made certain Native American religious practices illegal in the 19th and early 20th century. Although these policies have since been rescinded, they led to changes in many indigenous practices.  

  • The Jemez Mountains Bear Paw Quilt Guild invites the community to their annual Quilt Show.
    Come see a dazzling display of quilts, including the Patriotic Fallen Warrior Quilts given to New Mexico families that have lost a soldier in the Middle East.
    A selection of quilts and handmade items will also be available for sale (cash only).
    Admission is free. The event takes place July 21-23. Friday and Saturday the show will run 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. On Sunday, the show will run 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. It takes place at the Walatowa Visitor Center, 7413 Hwy 4.
     

  • Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington is returning to teach a one-day workshop on drawing using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center on July 20. This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), is great for all skill levels. The workshop will run from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, and nature-inspired art.

    Participants will explore pencil techniques that portray plants and animals. With easy to understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Lisa will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional, summer-themed subjects. Her next class will take place on July 27th and will feature painting and watercolor techniques.

    Coddington earned her Master of Art in Illustration at Syracuse University. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • This Sunday will mark the 71st anniversary of the Trinity Test, the first test  of an actual nuclear weapon. The test took place in the Jornada Del Muerto Desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico.

    At Fuller Lodge this weekend, the birth of the atomic bomb will be remembered in an hour and a half, thought-provoking performance that will include poetry by former Los Alamos native Allison Cobb, art by Japanese artist Yukiyo Kawano and dance by Butoh dancer Meshi Chavez. Stephen Miller and Lisa DeGrace will be providing the music and visual effects.

    The performance will actually center around the Aug. 9 bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, when the plutonium “Fat Man” bomb was dropped. Kawano created a replica of the Fat Man bomb from World War II era kimonos sewn together with Kawano’s hair. She has grandparents that survived the Hiroshima bombing on Aug. 6. The kimonos came from a shop owned by one of her grandmothers.

    The event is sponsored in part by the LA History museum.

    “When viewed together, the multiple perspectives from Los Alamos and Japan creates a more holistic history than what can be understood from only one point of view,” LA History Museum Director Judith Stauber said.