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Today's Features

  •  Family Night is set for 6-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities for the whole family with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey. The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    Mark your calendars: the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center. Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Families facing Alzheimer’s disease will have access to a free, seven-week education course in Los Alamos offered by the Alzheimer’s Association, New Mexico Chapter.
    The “Savvy Caregiver Program” course will be held each Wednesday from Feb. 21 through April 4.
    The program will be held once per week at the Aspen Ridge Lodge Retirement Home, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Each class lasts two hours from 1-3 p.m. The course is free and open to all.
    This evidence-based training aims to teach caregivers practical techniques for interacting with loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease, and for understanding and managing their behavior. It also imparts tools for long-term planning and for reducing stresses common to Alzheimer’s caregivers.
    The course explains the signs, impacts and pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.
    To register, or for further information, please contact Tina De Luz at (505) 266-4473, or email her at tdelaluz@alz.org. You can also contact Mary Yamada at (505) 661-0066, or email her at mary.d.yamada@gmail.com.
    Class size is limited and they do fill up quickly. Call now to register. Participants may be reimbursed for the cost of having others tend to their loved one while they attend the classes.

  • Hon Nguyen, owner of Chicken Teriyaki in White Rock, doesn’t like to brag. He lets his food speak for itself.
    But if he does talk about his food, he will readily give up the secret to his success, which is fresh food at a reasonable price, any way the customer wants it.
    “I’m not like those commercial restaurants,” Nguyen said. “We cook how the customer wants it.”
    While making a profit is a good thing, Nguyen also said that’s not what drives him. As a corrections officer who is nearing retirement, the real reward for him is customer satisfaction.  
    “Money is important, but what’s really important is when I see the customer finish the food, and then they come back,” Nguyen said. “That means to me they come here not because they happen to be hungry, but because my food tastes good, they come back because they can’t get that taste anywhere else. That’s what makes me happy.” Nguyen said he has customers come as far as Taos, Española and Santa Fe to eat his food.

  • Award-winning poet Joni Wallace will give a reading entitled “Mesas and Particles: Los Alamos as Literary Muse” at 7 p.m. Feb. 14 at Fuller Lodge in Los Alamos, presented by the Los Alamos Historical Society.
    Wallace grew up in Los Alamos and is the award-winning author of three books of poetry. Her lecture includes readings from her latest book, “Kingdom Come Radio Show” (Barrow Street, 2016).  
    Los Alamos and the Manhattan Project compose the backdrop for “Kingdom Come Radio Show,” a poetic documentation of place (Los Alamos) and history (both personal, and that of the Manhattan Project).
    “Oppenheimer, pacing at dawn, smoking, working the equation that says the atmosphere will/will not ignite when the gadget blows straight up into Kingdom Come. In the tilt shot, Kitty Puening Oppenheimer, drink in hand, clink, clink of ice against glass. … Cut to a long drive along a stretch of road, almost-dark, the percussive hiss of cicadas, stereo. Hank singing on this road of sin you are sorrow bound.” – “Kingdom Come Radio Show,” Barrow Street Press, 2016.

  • Belisama Irish Dance will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Meet the dancers, then participate and learn some ceili dance. Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets priced at $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with 4+ members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  • TODAY
    Española Valley and Los Alamos for a Super Bowl fundraiser at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 5 at the Pajarito Brew Pub. Kickoff is scheduled for local time. If your team did not make it to the Big Game, drown your disappointment with one of 30 beers on tap or 52 in the bottle. Pajarito Brew Pub General Manager Patrick Mockler-Wood, a long-time nail banger for Habitat for Humanity, has agreed to donate 10 percent of the proceeds to Habitat for Humanity on all food and drink orders during the game.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM from 10-11 a.m. at the Nature Center.
    Join local families for fun in nature. Free.
    TUESDAY
    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Christa Tyson, the volunteer coordinator for the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), will be our speaker. She will outline the benefits of volunteering and the opportunities available at PEEC.

  • Though some may consider a horseshoe a symbol of luck, many horse owners depend on horseshoes to help keep their horse’s hooves healthy. In turn, healthy horse hooves can result in a happy and performance-ready horse.
    The skilled tradesman that make horse shoes and apply them to horses’ hooves are called farriers. Jason Maki, farrier for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the important role of his job.
    “Farriers manage and provide protection for horse hooves,” Maki said. “Protection for the hoof is frequently a steel shoe which is formed and fit to the horse’s trimmed foot. The hoof also grows over time and often does not wear evenly or enough to allow the horse to remain comfortable. Thus, farriers trim excess growth and restore the hoof to a functional form.”
    Though Maki said a few horses may be able to self-maintain their feet, horses who perform repetitive motions, such as working or show horses, require horse shoes. If horse hooves are not trimmed and fitted for shoes, the result could mean lameness.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS  
    Juan—A distinguished 4- to 5-year-old male tabby with white markings. He was a stray living outdoors, with no known previous owner. Juan is afraid if people approach him too closely, but he loves cats and kittens. He would like a home where he can maintain his distance until he is ready to come closer. Of course, he would love to have cat or kitten companions, too. At the shelter, Juan has started becoming more comfortable with people who have spent time near him while respecting his boundaries. This is surely a good time for him to find a permanent home! If you would like to take on this special boy and possibly win him over, call for more information and visit him at the shelter.

  • Los Alamos authors will showcase their wares at the Local Authors Book Fair from 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Saturday at Mesa Public Library in Los Alamos.
    A wide range of genres and styles will be shared, from books for children, middle grades and young adults to biographies, social sciences and science fiction. The authors will have books available for purchase.
    The fair will include:
    Laura Kelly’s book “Splintered Reflections” tells the story of a young woman who feels she is losing herself after a traumatic loss. The story is one that will resonate with young and old alike, as the main character Cathy, finds a new way to be in the world. Laura Kelly works full-time at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and part-time as a fitness instructor at the Family YMCA, in addition to her new writing career.
    Bridget Thomas, of White Rock, has taken a true story and expanded on it, in which a little girl in Santa Fe creates Christmas joy by mixing the little she has with the natural bounty provided all around her. Her book “The Tumbleweed Christmas Tree” is illustrated by Jessie Baca.
    It is evident that Mary Maurice loves a good pun, and loves a good mystery. Her book “Fruit Loops the Serial Killer” starts off with a bang and never slows down until all is revealed.

  • Auditions for the Los Alamos Little Theatre’s “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” will be held this weekend at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar Street.
    Auditions  will start at noon Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday.  Callbacks will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday.
    Audition materials are available at the Mesa Public Library or by arrangement with John Cullinanl. Email Cullinanl at rev.jcullinan@gmail.com for information.
    Actors are requested to memorize one of two monologues provided in the audition materials.
    The monologues will be delivered solo to the production staff. After the solo readings, the group will gather everyone together to read scenes from the play.
    Casting for this play will be gender blind.