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Today's Features

  • By TIM DAHLBERG, AP Boxing Writer

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Conor McGregor's improbable challenge of Floyd Mayweather Jr. could be seen by a staggering 50 million people in the United States as fans and the curious gather in small and large parties.

    The fight Saturday night threatens the pay-per-view revenue record set by Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao two years ago and could dwarf it in viewership as people use the event as a reason to have friends and family over for a little escapism and controlled violence.

    "It's a cultural event that crosses all demographics and all social and economic factors," said Mark Taffet, who formerly ran pay-per-view for HBO. "People are getting together to have a great time and we surely need an excuse to have a great time."

    Taffet said that while an average of 5-6 people normally watches a pay-per-view, he wouldn't be surprised if the fight averages 10 people a household. If it sells 5 million pay-per-views as widely anticipated, the fight could be watched by nearly one in six Americans.

    The fight will also be seen by millions more worldwide, with promoters claiming it will be available either online or on a TV screen to more than 1 billion homes in 200 different countries.

  • The Community Internship Collaboration (CIC) will begin its third year of connecting UNM-Los Alamos (UNM-LA) and Los Alamos High School (LAHS) students with local business mentors for internship projects later this month.

    The program’s goals are to provide meaningful work experiences for students, meet area workforce needs and to develop the future workforce for the local community, the region and the Laboratory.

    Students are able to put knowledge and skills learned in the classroom to use in a practical way in a variety of industries and settings, while local businesses gain an intern eager to contribute to the success of their business at no cost to them.

    For students, the program provides an opportunity to “work, learn and earn.”

    Students will not only gain the work experience, but will have the opportunity to earn some money, while learning both on the job and in the classroom. CIC students also enroll in a class at UNM-LA specifically designed for students in this program and covering topics that include project management, Gantt charts, time management, problem solving, business communication, customer service and presentation skills.

  • Ken Hanson, a medical imaging research scientist at Los Alamos National Lab, has been selected as this year’s recipient of a top award from SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.

    Hanson received his award at a banquet in San Diego, California, on Aug. 9 during the annual SPIE Optics + Photonics conference.

    Hanson is receiving the 2017 SPIE Directors’ Award in recognition of substantial contributions to the long-running SPIE Medical Imaging symposium and of advances in medical image quality, restoration and 3D reconstruction techniques.

    Hanson served as SPIE Medical Imaging symposium chair from 2002-2004, on the program committee for the Imaging Processing conference from 1984-1995 and as the chair of that conference from 1996-2001.

    An accomplished photographer, he has provided a rich legacy for the community through chronicling the symposium in that medium for more than 30 years.

    Hanson has worked at LANL since 1975, including more than 20 years in the Dynamic Testing Division where he co-developed the Bayes Inference Engine, the principal analysis tool for quantitative interpretation of dynamic radiographs, and introduced other innovations such as new approaches to assess the uncertainties in simulation codes for the verification and validation of simulations.

  • TODAY
     Gordon Summer Concert features Diego Figuerido, a Brazilian jazz and Flemenco guitar master at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life Night with LA Medical Center.
    SATURDAY
     Taiji in the Park at 10 a.m. at Ashley Pond. Taiji is slow, flowing dance-like exercise for health, balance and vitality.
    SUNDAY
    
Nature Yoga and Trail Run at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a. M. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    
Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM
at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
    Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
     Sewing Camp for adults from 6-8 p.m. at Los Alamos Makers, 3540 Orange St. Cost is $35. Weekly sessions to learn the basics of sewing, such as how to sew zippers, buttonholes, straight stitch serger hem, etc. Sign up by emailing hello@losalamosmakers.org.
    TUESDAY

  • I wish you a new start filled with positivity tomorrow, as we head back to school. It begins a new chapter in many ways and hopefully we will encourage our children to take charge in writing their story.

    I look ahead to a new year of building Assets, helping community members to see the importance of building them each and every day, with the smallest of efforts. Since there are 40, the work is easy.

    The relationships we have throughout our lives, even into adulthood is what encourages us to want to learn, to keep on learning and to find the spark that lights the passion within each of us.

    It doesn’t matter what brings you passion, this year try and put it into play. It may come in a form you never considered or require that your life changes completely in order to fuel the desire to achieve it.

    I am elated that once again the Los Alamos County Council will proclaim the month of September “Assets Month,” with the goal of building Assets throughout the year.

  • The Los Alamos Juvenile Justice Advisory Board (JJAB) Family Resource Specialists and Mesa Public Library children’s librarians will host a community playdate for children ages newborn to 5-years-old.

    This drop-in event will be from 10:10 a.m.-1 p.m. Aug. 29 in the Youth Services rooms at Mesa Public Library, 2400 Central Avenue.

    The community playdate is to kick-off two early childhood literacy programs – Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library and 1000 Books Before Kindergarten.

    In addition to offering the opportunity to sign up for the literacy programs, this event will also feature play, movement, music and art activities for the children, and social time for adults.

    Snacks will be provided.

    Other local agencies participating in the community playdate include: Family Strengths Network, First Born Program of Los Alamos, PEEC Nature Center, the Many Mothers’ Baby Boxes program. The event is free.

  • By The Pajarito Conservation Allaince

  • At sundown on July 31, Jews around the world observed Tisha B’av, the most somber of Jewish holidays. It commemorates the destruction of the two temples in Jerusalem, first by the Babylonians and then, almost seven centuries later, in A.D. 70, by the Romans.

    Jews will remember these two historic calamities along with many others, including their slaughter during the First Crusade; the expulsions from England, France and Spain; and the Holocaust.The pattern of forced migration was set by the Babylonian conquest of 587-586 B.C., when the elite of Judah were marched to Babylon and the temple destroyed.

    Like the story of Moses and the Exodus from Egypt, which happened several centuries earlier, the Babylonian exile dwells at the heart of Judaism. The trauma served as a crucible, forcing the Israelites to rethink their relationship to Yahweh, reassess their standing as a chosen people and rewrite their history.

    Psalm 137, the subject of my most recent book, “Song of Exile,” is a 2,500-year-old Hebrew poem that deals with the exile that will be remembered on Tisha B’av. It has long served as an uplifting historical analogy for a variety of oppressed and subjugated groups, including African-Americans.

    Origins of the psalm

  • Visitors and locals driving up NM 475 (the road to the Santa Fe Ski Basin) may notice something happening with aspen groves that create one of the most popular vistas on the Santa Fe National Forest.

    To the casual observer, the aspens may appear to be dying. But those bare branches signal the return of the western tent caterpillars, native defoliators whose larvae feed on a variety of hardwood trees species. At least here in New Mexico, they seem to be particularly fond of aspen.

    The caterpillar gets its name from the conspicuous “tent” it builds on branches and twigs. The silken shelter protects the larvae during molting. As they mature, the larvae disperse and continue feeding on leaves until it’s time to retreat into cocoons for their transformation into moths. The process takes a couple months after which the adults mate and the female moths lay the eggs that become next year’s caterpillars.

  • Want to learn more about the Hubble Telescope and the Universe? Come to the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium for a presentation on one of NASA’s most ambitious experiments at 7 p.m. Sept. 15 . The full-dome planetarium film Exploding Universe will play at 2 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17.

    On Sept. 15, the show will begin with a screening of NOVA: Invisible Universe Revealed, which will be followed by a talk by Dr. Rick Wallace. The film and presentation will share the astronomical significance of the Hubble Space Telescope findings, including cosmic expansion and supermassive black holes.

    Exploding Universe, showing at 2 p.m. Sept. 16 and 17, uncovers cosmic events that shaped the Universe. This full-dome film explores a world where supernovas erupt, massive materials collide, and protons give birth to life as we know it. For more information about these and future planetarium shows, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. For tickets, call 662-0460.