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Today's Features

  • Green thumbs moving to Los Alamos often get a shock. Not only is the soil difficult to work with, but the water situation is a little tough, too.
    One can go all winter without a drop and a very expensive water bill, and then suddenly wake up to a deluge when the spring arrives. It can destroy all the hard work of nursing that flower or vegetable garden through yet another tough year. With the lowest annual precipitation count of six inches and a high of 30(!) inches, New Mexico is indeed a land of contrasts.
    So.. what to do? The New Mexico State University Los Alamos County Cooperative Extension Office suggests the key to lessening water bills and frustrations is to just go with the flow. Instead of planting Touch Me Nots, Black-Eyed Susans and Spiderworts, try for something a little closer to home, plants native to New Mexico that are just as pretty and can thrive on little to no water.
    For vegetable gardening, a little research into how the Native Americans thrived up here on the Pajarito Plateau can go a long way. They did it on just a little water and very little work. The Three Sisters technique has been used by the pueblo indians for centuries. They discovered that planting beans, squash and corn together results in a garden that’s virtually maintenance free, even in the driest and toughest of conditions.

  • On a beautiful spring Saturday morning, a few local ladies (and a few men) gathered in the Memorial Rose Garden with Extension Officer Carlos Valdez to learn tips and tricks for pruning rose bushes. The New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service has been working with the Garden Club every year for 30 years on this particular talk.
    “It’s been a great relationship that we’ve had,” Valdez said, and thanked the Garden Club for providing all the beautiful roses in the garden. The Los Alamos Garden Club has been in place since the mid-1940s and has taken care of the Memorial Rose Garden since 1957.
    Although the workshop focused on pruning rose bushes, Valdez began the morning with general information concerning planting and rose care.
    Extra tip: It is best to ease into the growing season with water and fertilizer. In the same way, ease out of the season gently with those things.
    Plantings Roses: To explain most of his tips, Valdez used the example of bare root roses. “Find yourself a reputable rose supplier. You want to purchase the highest grade of rose that you can get,” he said. Once the rose bush is purchased, soak overnight in a bucket of water and plant it the following day.

  • TODAY
    Join the Los Alamos History Museum for an exhibit opening from 3-5 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos History Museum Rotating Gallery. Culture and Collaboration: The Los Alamos/Japan Project explores the goals of this unique intercultural initiative to create understanding through shared history, partnerships, dialogue, multiple perspectives, and collaboration. On display through July 9.

    Astronomy Show: Solar System Revelations
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Dr. Galen Gisler uncovers new revelations about our Solar System. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Earth Day Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to celebrate Earth Day at the Los Alamos Nature Center, where there will be engaging activities, fun entertainment, and delicious food. Free.
     
    Saturday to March 5:
Earth Day Feature Film: We are Stars
at 12:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • This month’s Military Order of the World Wars Chapter 229 meeting will start at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Research Park the second floor conference room.
    The speaker will be Rep. Stephanie Garcia-Richard. She will be reporting on actions taken in this year’s annual New Mexico legislative session.
    The meeting will begin with a social period, followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m.
    The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Café staff will be catering the dinner: Pork tenderloin and appropriate side dishes. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP either with a yes or no for the dinner by Sunday.
    Call LTC Gregg Giesler, USA Retired, Chapter Commander, 662-5574 (g.gieslercomputer.org) or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email: depinyan@cybermesa.com).
     

  • The Los Alamos Nature Center is ending the month with a star workshop at 7 p.m. April 28 and an exciting astronomy film “Phantom of the Universe” at 2 p.m. April 29 and 30.
    The Friday star workshop is a family-friendly two-hour program that starts by charting the major constellations in the planetarium. Then, weather permitting, participants will practice identifying objects and constellations outside the nature center. Educator Jon Lorenz will weave Greek and Southwest Native American star legends of the visible constellations in view. Space is limited. Visit peecnature.org/planetarium to register.
    “Phantom of the Universe” is a full-dome planetarium show that showcases an exciting exploration of dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. This film will play at 2 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday.

  • TODAY
    Astronomy Show: Star Stories - Color
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is  $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    Middle-schoolers invited to participate in Dance For A Cure at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack. Cost is $5. Pizza while supplies last. Benefits the American Cancer Society.
    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: “Sea Monsters, A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. 
Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Coffee with the Warden
from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Bring wildlife questions and talk with the local Game & Fish warden Amos Smith. Free.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: Sea Monsters, “A Prehistoric Adventure” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. See prehistoric sea creatures come to life, and follow fossil hunters to remote locations as they excavate the remains of some of the most awe-inspiring creatures of all time. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
     

  • Artists Jamie Winslow and Elaine Bradshaw will celebrate spring in O’Keefe country with the exhibit “A Sense of Place,” a show of engaging paintings and 3D works.
    Free and open to all ages, the art can be viewed daily from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. from April 29-May 28 at the Galleria Arriba at Abiquiu Inn.
    A public reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. May 5. During this time (and other times by appointment), the artists will be available to explain their techniques, answer questions and help visitors select pieces.
    About the artists
    Bradshaw paints “to celebrate the life force of the natural world, especially here in the high desert.” Through her energetic, colorful acrylic images, she hopes to help viewers to become more aware of and to connect with their own environments. She will display some fused glass works, as well.
    Winslow is a painter and sculptor who aims to intrigue viewers and to draw them into thoughtful dialogue with her pieces. She uses various media to express herself, and notes that her work  “has been described as organic, ethnic, contemporary and sometimes whimsical.” She delights in the joy that her art brings to her own life and to her collectors.

  • The Unitarian Church of Los Alamos will host “Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition & New World Identities,” a special lecture-recital on Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) Romanceros, Coplas and Kantigas at 3 p.m. on Saturday.

    This program was previously presented at the New Mexico History Museum’s Fractured Faiths Symposium, as part of their six-month special exhibit in the fall of 2016.

    The event features soprano Christina Martos and pianist Debra Ayers performing works by Ofer Ben-Amots, an Israeli-American composer and chair of the music department at Colorado College.

    Ben-Amots will lecture about his recreations of musical settings for songs dating to the era of the Jewish diaspora in Spain, a time that gave rise to the unique hybrid of Hebrew and Spanish known as Ladino.

    Los Alamos soprano Martos sang several seasons with Central City Opera in Colorado and the Washington National Opera, and most recently performed at the world premiere of Los Bufones by Santa Fe composer Ron Strauss at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

  • “It began at Bethel.” With these words, historian and educator Dr. Martha Bouyer proceeded to take me back in time to the birth of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. “The Movement,” as its members called it, started at Bethel Baptist Church, under the steerage of the church’s fiery pastor, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. It was Shuttlesworth who organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) after the State of Alabama declared the NAACP a foreign corporation which could no longer exist. This was in response to the Reverend’s refusal to turn over the names of the local members of the organization.
    To many, Shuttlesworth’s name might be unfamiliar. I was unaware of this man’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement until I visited Birmingham on an historical tourism trip. Shuttlesworth emerged as a “hidden figure,” who was often shadowed by other such well-known leaders of the time as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Ralph Abernathy. But, it was Shuttlesworth who initially galvanized the black community with the aim of dismantling the city’s segregation ordinances. He was the spark that created the flame.

  • Davis Bengay, an honorary consul general of Japan for New Mexico, will give a lecture at 7 p.m. April 11 at Fuller Lodge. This is part of the Los Alamos historical Society Lecture Series of 2016-17.
    The talk will be on “Japanese Life in New Mexico.” Before his appointment, Bengay and his wife, Ikuko, held the positions of liaison officers for the Japanese Consulates.
    Bengay earned a degree in International Business Relations from the University of New Mexico and is retired from Sandia National Laboratories. Ikuko Begay is from Hiroshima, Japan. She earned her MBA from UNM and has served as a bridge between Americans and Japanese in New Mexico.