.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sue Grafton, author of the best-selling "alphabet series" of mystery novels, has died in Santa Barbara. She was 77.

    Grafton was surrounded by family, including husband Steven Humphrey, when she died Thursday after a two-year battle with cancer, her daughter, Jamie Clark, posted on the author's website.

    "Although we knew this was coming, it was unexpected and fast. She had been fine up until just a few days ago, and then things moved quickly," the posting said.

    Grafton began her "alphabet series" in 1982 with "A is for Alibi." Her most recent book, "Y is for Yesterday," was published in August.

    "Many of you also know that she was adamant that her books would never be turned into movies or TV shows, and in that same vein, she would never allow a ghost writer to write in her name," her daughter wrote. "Because of all of those things, and out of the deep abiding love and respect for our dear sweet Sue, as far as we in the family are concerned, the alphabet now ends at Y."

  • ST. CATHERINE’S, Egypt (AP) — Egypt reopened on Dec. 16 an ancient library which holds thousands of centuries-old religious and historical manuscripts at the famed St. Catherine Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage site, in South Sinai.

    The inauguration ceremony, attended by Egyptian and western officials, comes after three years of restoration work on the eastern side of the library that houses the world’s second largest collection of early codices and manuscripts, outnumbered only by the Vatican Library, according to Monk Damyanos, the monastery’s archbishop.

    “The library is now open to the public and scholars,” said Tony Kazamias, an adviser to the archbishop, adding that restoration work is still underway.

    The ancient library holds around 3,300 manuscripts of mainly Christian texts in Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Georgian, and Slavonic among other languages. It also contains thousands of books and scrolls dating to the 4th century. At least 160 of the manuscripts include faint scratches and ink tints beneath more recent writing, according to Kazamias, who believes the palimpsests were likely scraped out by the monastery’s monks and reused sometime between the 8th- 12th centuries.

  • Art exhibits
    House of Eternal Return, Meow Wolf. A unique art experience featuring a wild new form of non-linear storytelling, which includes exploration, discovery and 21st century interactivity. Located at 1352 Rufina Circle, Santa Fe. Call 395-6369 for information. Hours are Sunday through Thursday 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed every Tuesday. Friday and Saturday 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

    New Mexico History Museum and Santa Fe Opera to recognize “Atomic Histories” in 2018 and 2019. The History Museum’s exhibition opens June 3 and will run through May 2019. The History Museum is located at 113 Lincoln Ave. in Santa Fe. Call 476-5200 for information. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. daily, May through October and closed Mondays November through April.

    Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival. The exhibition runs through Jan. 7, 2018. Winter hours (through April 30) are Tuesday through Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Summer hours (starting May 1) are Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Cooking
    Gluten-Free Holiday baking class from 1:30-5:30 p.m. Friday at the United Church, 2525 Canyon Road in Los Alamos. Cost is $10. Contact the LA Cooperative Extension Service, 662-2656.
    Dance

  • Local residents Janet Harris and Jennifer Jordan tied for first place in the Los Alamos Small Business Saturday GooseChase Scavenger Hunt, and were each awarded $200 in Chamber Checks.

    This year, Los Alamos Small Business Saturday shoppers had the chance to join in some scavenger hunt fun through a smart phone app called GooseChase. 

    “GooseChase scavenger hunts combine the fun of a traditional scavenger hunt with smart phone technology,” said Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation Executive Director Patrick Sullivan. “It’s a great way to give shoppers a fun reason to get around to as many businesses as possible, accumulate points in real-time, and this year’s winners visited some local businesses they didn’t even know existed!”

    The Los Alamos Small Business Saturday Scavenger Hunt opened at 9 a.m. Nov. 25 and closed at 5 p.m. Dec 2. Scavenger hunt participants downloaded the GooseChase app on their smart phones, signed into the “SmallBizSaturday” game, then visited the listed businesses and took pictures of themselves at each location. 

    The photos are submitted through the app awarding points in real-time at each location. Scavenger hunt participants could be in teams or individuals.

  • TODAY
    Luminaria Walk and Buffet at Sombrillo Nursing Facility and Aspen Ridge Lodge, 1010 Sombrillo Court, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Community is invited. No RSVP required. Dinner and Dessert at our facilities. Contact Cynthia Goldblatt, liaison, at 695-8981.
    THURSDAY
    Poet Jon Davis will speak at 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library in the upstairs rotunda, 2400 Central Ave., Los Alamos. Davis is the author of six chapbooks and four books of poetry. He has received numerous awards for his poetry, including a Lannan Literary Award, two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, and the Lavan Younger Poets Award from the Academy of American Poets. He occasionally performs as the peripatetic poet Chuck Calabreze.
    FRIDAY
    December 15 —
Gentle Walk
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Chartwell’s Food Services has rolled into the holiday season with a little help from their friends and family members, as they kicked off their Thanksgiving service with about 400 pounds of turkey, 210 pumpkin pies, an obscene amount of mashed potatoes, gravy and green beans.

    “Service of all the schools during our Thanksgiving Extravaganza was nuts,” said Chef Mia Holsapple. “It was much better than last year when we tried to serve all the schools on the same day, but this year we spread it out over a one-week period.”

    Chamisa Elementary kicked off the first holiday meal with 240 served, followed by Aspen Elementary, which served 720, thanks to a generous donation of meals for the entire student body by Del Norte Credit Union. The middle and high school added the Thanksgiving offering in addition to their regular menu, but estimate about 300 turkey meals between the two schools. Pinon Elementary was on Thursday, with 320 meals and Barranca Mesa and Mountain elementary schools brought up the end of the week with Barranca having 400 meals and Mountain 515. 

  • Serena Birnbaum from Los Alamos has earned the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest and most prestigious achievement in Girl Scouting.

    The Gold Award, which challenges Girl Scouts to make a difference in their communities, is presented to fewer than 6 percent of Girl Scouts each year.

    The award is recognized by colleges and employers.  

    Birnbaum’s project “Choir Risers” addressed the need to support the arts program at Los Alamos High School. 

    The current risers were decades old and rickety. Birnbaum said she “hopes future students benefit from a rehearsal space that is well equipped and conducive to an active learning environment.” 

    “I learned a lot from this project including how important it is to support what you enjoy in life,” she said. “I learned about leadership and what it means to be in charge of a large scale project. This knowledge contributed to my growth as a person and leader because it gave me valuable experience and knowledge that I will use throughout my life.”

    Other Los Alamos awardees include Kaya Loy, Emily McLaughlin, Jaida Connolly, Isabel Meana, Seanna Shedd and Katelyn Tapia. All Bronze awardees, the highest award a junior level team can achieve.

  • This is a such a great time of year for so many reasons, that I thought it might be nice to address some pitfalls, before they take place.

    “Happy Holidays” is a general term of greeting exchanged this time of year. There is no disrespect to anyone involved, it is just a holiday greeting akin to, “have a nice day.” There are so many things being celebrated this time of year and this is the opportunity to embrace them all.

    I enjoyed a commercial I heard recently from KOAT’s Doug Fernandez. He said that he loves the fact that they call it the holiday season because of how long we celebrate. I feel exactly the same way, it starts Oct. 1 with decorating for Halloween and goes for a solid five to six months.

    It really kicks in as Thanksgiving approaches and you can wish everyone happy holidays and cover all of the bases. You can’t tell by sight what someone celebrates, but happy holidays kind of says it all.

    This is the time of year that some people get ruffled that you may seem disrespectful by not saying, Merry Christmas and I say not at all. You are just being respectful of everyone. If you disagree or think you do, then I challenge you to Google, can a non-Jewish person wish someone a Happy Hanukkah? Go ahead, I dare you to do it anyway.

  • USDA Forest Service visitor maps will increase in price from $10 to $14 effective Jan. 1.

    Rising costs of production, printing, and distribution have driven the need for the price increase of the paper and plastic-coated visitor maps, the first such increase in almost a decade. The agency continually updates its maps, seeking to enhance them as well. The Forest Service also expects to shorten the revision cycle as its cartographers continue applying new digital technology to the map revision process. 

    The agency is also working to increase the availability of digital maps, which cost $4.99 per side. Digital maps for mobile applications can be downloaded at avenza.com/pdf-maps/store. 

    As always, forest visitor maps are available for sale at those Forest Service offices in Arizona and New Mexico that currently sell them. 

    Volume purchases are available from the National Forest Map Store and can be ordered at NationalForestStore.com or by phone at 406-329-3024.

    To help offset the price increase for volume sales, discount pricing will now be available to all customers starting Jan. 1.

    Discounted maps are only available when purchased through the NFMS.