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Today's Features

  • Today, I hope you’ll indulge me in a lesson in time travel.
    I feel like the most important thing you can learn from me is how fast time goes when you have children. I assume because for adults it becomes a new measure of time. I’m not sure what it is called exactly, “BC,” before children and “AC,” after children, but hopefully you are aware before it is too late.
    If you know me well, the most important thing in life is our children. The bad news for them is that doesn’t mean that we buy them everything.
    Hopefully it does mean we have passed along some wisdom, some life skills, some meaning that all of this daily grind is supposed to be worth it.
    On Saturday, our oldest, Chandler, one of a handful of fine folks that printed this very newspaper you are reading, turns 21. It’s probably the most important age for a young person today. It is also probably the last “celebrated” age.
    Sure we turn 30 or 40 or 50, but the same excitement doesn’t exist until that age is close to a retirement number.
    This beautiful baby boy came into our lives on Feb. 11, 1996 and it seems like yesterday.
    His beautiful blue eyes, just like his dad and these big box like feet, ahh that’s my boy.

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

  • Jim O’Donnell, director of operations of the Reel Deal Theater, treated students of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos’ Intro to Film Studies class (MA210) to a tour of the projection room Feb. 1, then a viewing of the musical film “La La Land.”  
    A topic of discussion was the transition from film projectors to digital projectors. The students in this semester-long course at UNM-LA have already studied the history of musicals in film.  
    Follow up projects will address how specific techniques employed in the film impact the overall experience for the viewer. “La La Land” has garnered 214 award nominations, and received 144 awards.
    The film also has 14 nominations for the Oscar Awards, which will be announced on Feb 26. Hardy and the students gave the experience behind the scenes at Reel Deal Theater “two thumbs up!”

  •  Family Night is set for 6-7 p.m. Tuesday at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Enjoy an evening of games and hands-on activities for the whole family with Mesa Public Library’s Melissa Mackey. The nature center will be open for exploring the exhibits until 8 p.m.
    Mark your calendars: the second Tuesday of each month is Family Night at the nature center. Thanks to a generous sponsorship from the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, this program is free for all. For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Families facing Alzheimer’s disease will have access to a free, seven-week education course in Los Alamos offered by the Alzheimer’s Association, New Mexico Chapter.
    The “Savvy Caregiver Program” course will be held each Wednesday from Feb. 21 through April 4.
    The program will be held once per week at the Aspen Ridge Lodge Retirement Home, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Each class lasts two hours from 1-3 p.m. The course is free and open to all.
    This evidence-based training aims to teach caregivers practical techniques for interacting with loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease, and for understanding and managing their behavior. It also imparts tools for long-term planning and for reducing stresses common to Alzheimer’s caregivers.
    The course explains the signs, impacts and pathology of Alzheimer’s disease.
    To register, or for further information, please contact Tina De Luz at (505) 266-4473, or email her at tdelaluz@alz.org. You can also contact Mary Yamada at (505) 661-0066, or email her at mary.d.yamada@gmail.com.
    Class size is limited and they do fill up quickly. Call now to register. Participants may be reimbursed for the cost of having others tend to their loved one while they attend the classes.

  • Hon Nguyen, owner of Chicken Teriyaki in White Rock, doesn’t like to brag. He lets his food speak for itself.
    But if he does talk about his food, he will readily give up the secret to his success, which is fresh food at a reasonable price, any way the customer wants it.
    “I’m not like those commercial restaurants,” Nguyen said. “We cook how the customer wants it.”
    While making a profit is a good thing, Nguyen also said that’s not what drives him. As a corrections officer who is nearing retirement, the real reward for him is customer satisfaction.  
    “Money is important, but what’s really important is when I see the customer finish the food, and then they come back,” Nguyen said. “That means to me they come here not because they happen to be hungry, but because my food tastes good, they come back because they can’t get that taste anywhere else. That’s what makes me happy.” Nguyen said he has customers come as far as Taos, Española and Santa Fe to eat his food.

  • Award-winning poet Joni Wallace will give a reading entitled “Mesas and Particles: Los Alamos as Literary Muse” at 7 p.m. Feb. 14 at Fuller Lodge in Los Alamos, presented by the Los Alamos Historical Society.
    Wallace grew up in Los Alamos and is the award-winning author of three books of poetry. Her lecture includes readings from her latest book, “Kingdom Come Radio Show” (Barrow Street, 2016).  
    Los Alamos and the Manhattan Project compose the backdrop for “Kingdom Come Radio Show,” a poetic documentation of place (Los Alamos) and history (both personal, and that of the Manhattan Project).
    “Oppenheimer, pacing at dawn, smoking, working the equation that says the atmosphere will/will not ignite when the gadget blows straight up into Kingdom Come. In the tilt shot, Kitty Puening Oppenheimer, drink in hand, clink, clink of ice against glass. … Cut to a long drive along a stretch of road, almost-dark, the percussive hiss of cicadas, stereo. Hank singing on this road of sin you are sorrow bound.” – “Kingdom Come Radio Show,” Barrow Street Press, 2016.

  • Belisama Irish Dance will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Feb. 25 at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Meet the dancers, then participate and learn some ceili dance. Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets priced at $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with 4+ members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  • TODAY
    Española Valley and Los Alamos for a Super Bowl fundraiser at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 5 at the Pajarito Brew Pub. Kickoff is scheduled for local time. If your team did not make it to the Big Game, drown your disappointment with one of 30 beers on tap or 52 in the bottle. Pajarito Brew Pub General Manager Patrick Mockler-Wood, a long-time nail banger for Habitat for Humanity, has agreed to donate 10 percent of the proceeds to Habitat for Humanity on all food and drink orders during the game.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM from 10-11 a.m. at the Nature Center.
    Join local families for fun in nature. Free.
    TUESDAY
    Kiwanis meeting from noon-1 p.m. in Kelly Hall at Trinity-on-the-Hill Episcopal Church, 3900 Trinity Drive. Christa Tyson, the volunteer coordinator for the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), will be our speaker. She will outline the benefits of volunteering and the opportunities available at PEEC.

  • Though some may consider a horseshoe a symbol of luck, many horse owners depend on horseshoes to help keep their horse’s hooves healthy. In turn, healthy horse hooves can result in a happy and performance-ready horse.
    The skilled tradesman that make horse shoes and apply them to horses’ hooves are called farriers. Jason Maki, farrier for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the important role of his job.
    “Farriers manage and provide protection for horse hooves,” Maki said. “Protection for the hoof is frequently a steel shoe which is formed and fit to the horse’s trimmed foot. The hoof also grows over time and often does not wear evenly or enough to allow the horse to remain comfortable. Thus, farriers trim excess growth and restore the hoof to a functional form.”
    Though Maki said a few horses may be able to self-maintain their feet, horses who perform repetitive motions, such as working or show horses, require horse shoes. If horse hooves are not trimmed and fitted for shoes, the result could mean lameness.