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Today's Features

  • Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe presents the world premiere of “Not Quite Right,” an upbeat family comedy by Elaine Jarvik and Los Alamos playwright Robert F. Benjamin.
    “Not Quite Right” features a misshapen pot, a marathon dance and a three a.m. mêlée over “what’s enough?”  Three couples grapple with dueling expectations in the wee hours of the morning when everything seems, well, not quite right.
    The story is a comedic family drama about three married couples. The first couple is Carol and Marty who are nearly age 60. He lost his job several months ago and Carol thinks he might have been fired. She is habitually critical of Marty’s eccentric behavior and clothing, but she tries to be supportive until she learns his secrets.
    The second couple, age mid-30s is Jessica and Andrew, parents of twins in kindergarten. While at a fundraiser marathon dance, they clash about whether to have another child. Jess’s idealism about overpopulation seems to trump Andrew’s desire for more children.
    The third couple, late age 50s, is Sally and Tom. He just won an award at work, which triggers his thoughts about what a dismal career he’s had and how he’s expecting his children will do better. How much success is enough?

  • “Uncommon Valor,” a documentary about the battle on Iwo Jima will be presented to the public at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the upstairs meeting rooms.  
    “Uncommon Valor” is a Canadian-produced documentary, which is not often shown in the United States. This free showing commemorates the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima.
    Los Alamos Living Treasure Bill Hudson was among the first Marines to land on the small volcanic island on Feb. 19, 1945. He described the scene as follows:
    “I never heard so much noise or saw so much smoke in my life. The scene could only be described as chaos, havoc, destruction, carnage, suffering and death. That was an experience that was just absolutely unbelievable.”
    At the end of that first bloody day, only 27 of the 47 men in Hudson’s platoon were left, and after a month of intense fighting, only two platoon members remained to fight- many had been killed, and many others injured. The United States Marine Corps counted more than 26,000 casualties in the battle, with 6,800 dead.

  • The Santa Fe Community Orchestra (SFCO) presents works by Nielsen, Sibelius, Bruch and Vivaldi at its mid-season concert. The show begins at 2:30 p.m. March 1 at the St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art in downtown Santa Fe. Admission is free, however, donations are appreciated.
    Brian Newnam is a Los Alamos resident and a well known string player in the area. He will be a soloist at the SFCO performance. He will be playing viola in the Bruch Romance for Viola.  
    This concert features Nielsen’s Symphony No.2: The Four Temperaments, plus the symphonic poem, Finlandia by Sibelius. The program also includes winners of the SFCO Concerto Competition, along with Newnam, Eve Kaye and Anne Hays Egan will perform the first movement of Vivaldi’s Concerto for Two Violins in A minor. Music director Oliver Prezant will serve as conductor. For more information, call 466-4879, or visit sfco.org.
    The award-winning Santa Fe Community Orchestra, established in 1982, is made up of volunteer musicians from Santa Fe and surrounding areas.  The SFCO presents five free concerts every season, education programs for public school students and concert audiences, and special events like “Let’s Dance!” an annual swing and ballroom dance at the Convention Center. 

  • Just in time for Valentine’s Day, the Española MainStreet Theatre put on a series of romantic and not so romantic productions. “Love is Never Easy” is 10 separate vignettes adapted from various works centered around a love theme.
    The production spanned through a number of genres and time periods — and not all stories concluded with a happy ending.
    The first two short segments were a quick cappella of “Fly Me To The Moon,” sung by Don Hassemer, followed by the sonnet “How Do I Love Thee,” from Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and performed by Shirley “Joan” Walker. The skit was pulled off as a sweet serenade between two strangers of the older persuasion.
    The story of “Bluesman” was worthy of a mention. The story from a character named Suzanna about Herbert Jackson Walker, who left her in a favor of a music career. A blues guitar wails off stage, played by Eric Archuleta. Janet Rodriguez does a sultry, dramatic and slightly bitter monologue about the wayward lover.
    “He Said and She Said” was a painful back and forth with a manipulative gossip queen (played by Kaitlin Calkins) at the helm. Her “idle tongue” almost destroys the lives of everyone around her.

  • Santa Fe
    El Paseo, 208 Galisteo St.
    Date Inspected: Dec. 18
    Violations: Three high-risk violations. Eggs raw stored above ready to eat food (corrected). Not sanitizing glassware in bar area three-compartment sink 0ppm (corrected 50 ppm). Hard surface sanitizer +200ppm (corrected 100 ppm). Employee drink in prep area not in container with straw and lid (corrected). Two moderate-risk violations. Particle accumulation on ice machine and bottom of freezer. Peeling paint above hand washing sink. Two low-risk violations. Floor tiles cracked or missing in food prep, food storage and toilet rooms. Light cover in food prep area cracked
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow-up required.

  • Former news anchor
    to talk in Santa Fe

  • Art exhibits
    Willy Bo Richardson: Reverberant Matter/Project I. Show runs through Feb. 27 at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design at Wade Wilson Art.

    John Chervinsky – An Experiment in Perspective. 5-7 p.m. Friday at photo-eye bookstore and project space, 376 Garcia Street Suite A. For more information, or to arrange an interview, contact Anne Kelly, 988-5152, ext. 121 or anne@photoeye.com.
    Solo exhibition by Jeri Moore. “The Language of Humanity.” Through February at the Act I Gallery.

    Weyrich Gallery features “The Landscape of Meditation” with artists Donna Loraine Contractor (local treasure), she presents her newest series, “The Sacred Geometry Tapestries”, Jerry Barnett (fused glass). Show closes Saturday. Weyrich Gallery, 2935 D. Louisiana Blvd. in Albuquerque.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces “Under 35: Part III.” The exhibition will feature works by Nicola López, Nouel Riel and Jack Warren. The show runs until Saturday.

  • THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Feb. 20, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 2-17-15
    02:00 PM MPL Authors Speak Series
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Senior Olympics
    06:30 PM Africa: Mothers of Invention
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Ernest Taylor Pyle”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Community Central
    10:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Now It Can Be Told”
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Feb. 22, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • It is the thought that children learn best when they are having fun. A summer camp where art and science merge is now accepting applications for kids in Los Alamos. The camps start in July. Registration is now underway for Big Sky Build It! in Los Alamos.
    Camps in Santa Fe start in June and vary slightly from the Los Alamos schedule. For details about the Santa Fe programs, visit bigskylearning.com.
    Developed in 1996, Big Sky Learning has provided innovative, hands on programs for children, teens and teaching professionals. Campers learn to make high-flying rockets, designing and building their own robots and soldering music systems for their iPods.
    “The classes are a small ration of teacher to camper,” said Michael Sheppard, Big Sky Learning founder and director. Big Sky Build It! is the camp that branched out to Los Alamos three years ago. “We are seeking participants to keep the program going,” he said.
    Courses are scheduled at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Los Alamos. Each program is a week long and goes for three weeks. The current schedule for the Los Alamos program is July 13-23.
    Instructors consist of teacher and teen educators. The program is partnered with Santa Fe Public Schools and Sheppard said the program is in the process of partnering with Los Alamos Public Schools.  

  • This April will mark another milestone for Los Alamos: the much-anticipated Nature Center will open its doors to residents and visitors alike, so they can learn all about the nature they experience on the Pajarito Plateau.
    The new nature center will be run by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    PEEC will be hosting an event from 10 a.m.-noon Feb. 24 at its current location at 3540 Orange Street, for those interested in learning more about becoming a volunteer docent.
    The informal event will be open-house style, so anyone can drop in during the event. PEEC staff and current volunteers will be on hand to discuss what skills are needed to be a docent and what can be expected in this highly visible volunteer job. Pastries, coffee and tea will be served.
    To learn more about becoming a docent or for information, contact PEEC Volunteer Coordinator Linda Boncella at linda@peecnature.org or 662-0460.