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Today's Features

  • Gordon McDonough, well known artist and educator at the Bradbury Science Museum, offered to create a donation box for the new Los Alamos County Nature Center, and it has now arrived, ready to enchant all donors.
    When visitors slide your dollar bill into the slot, a light flashes to check that it’s a bill, not a piece of paper. Then the fun begins. An acorn woodpecker may tap on a tree, an Abert’s squirrel may swish his tail, a bobcat may stick his head up, or a pika may pop out.  
    Even more intriguing, people can look at the mechanisms that trigger the action; they’re visible below the money box, with hand-made wooden gears turning as they produce the action above.  
    In discussing ideas for the donation box with McDonough, PEEC mentioned these four iconic creatures of the Pajarito Plateau and hoped he’d figure out a way to use one. When he came through with all four, the staff was amazed. 

  • The North Mesa Dog Park will be closed for the installation of a new irrigation system and new fencing to extend the park and also to include a small dog area. The park will be closed through Friday.  
    The county expects to open the park for the weekend.  For information call the parks superintendent, Jeff Humpton, at 662-8159.

  • Business After Hours is a monthly after-work-hours social that promotes interaction, friendship,  and identification of business opportunities.
    The Business After Hours will at 5:30–7 p.m. Wednesday at Los Alamos Medical Center, 3917 West Road, under the canopy on the canyon side of LAMC.
    This will be a community collaboration celebration catered by Blue Window Bistro.
    Come help LAMC celebrate National Hospital Week, 64 years in Los Alamos and meet and greet local non profits.
    There will be prizes and give-aways. Attendees can also visit with LAMC physicians.
    Register online at losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/details/business-after-hours-may-2016-145.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Elizabeth—A 4-year-old Russian Blue mix who prefers the company of people rather than the company of other felines. She doesn’t mind the company of mellow cats, especially if they let her be the “queen” and don’t pick on her too much! She still enjoys a bit of playtime, and she loves chasing catnip mice around the cat room! This sweet girl will meow softly at you when she’s ready for some petting.

  • Investment Group at BESC. This is an informal group that meets weekly at the Betty Ehart Senior Center at 10 a.m. Thursdays.  The purpose of this group is primarily to share knowledge and information.
    Investment strategies, stock and mutual fund tips may be discussed, as well as general discussions about the economy, except politics are usually avoided. This group does not invest any shared funds as a group and is not an investment club in that sense. A new group that restricts it’s subject matter to options trading also meets at BESC, but meets at 10 a.m. on the first and third Wednesdays twice a month. Anyone interested in attending can contact Harry Watanabe at 662-6284, Don Blossom at 984-9995, or just show up at the meetings.

  • Volunteers are needed to help with events for the community-sponsored, all-night senior graduation celebration known as SAN (Senior Appreciation Night), for shifts that begin at 6 p.m. May 28.
    SAN was created as a fun, safe alternative to dangerous celebrations for graduates. The event is in its 32nd year and typically serves 350 students.  
    Volunteers are needed to work a two-to three-hour shift at an early evening barbecue, to hand out games at the Los Alamos YMCA Teen Center, to help at United Skates, Wild West Photos, a late-night carnival and to chaperone movies beginning at 12:30 a.m.
    Volunteers may email Diana Martinez at dmartinez@laymca.org, or call at 662-3100.
    SAN was created in 1984 by several community volunteers and organizations.

  • The Los Alamos High School Naval Junior ROTC Unit celebrated many accomplishments during the month of April.
    The program held their annual awards ceremony, senior recognition, unit birthday and received the results of their annual inspection of the entire unit.
    Lieutenant Commander, Wes Shumaker, is celebrating another successful year with the LAHS unit and one might believe he has the “Midas touch,” but there’s a lot of wisdom and dedication behind his continued success.
    “Keep the bar high, reward and acknowledge those that put out the effort and also be flexible with changes that occur,” said Shumaker. “We continually look for those that have the desire and drive to lead in the future and provide them with the opportunities to develop themselves.”
    One such highlight of their success this year was when the unit traveled to Albuquerque to compete in the New Mexico State Drill and Air Rifle Championships. They returned home with class 5A state championship banners for both precision air rifle and fitness and placed second over in the competition sweepstakes.
    That meet wasn’t a one-time success as the unit again recently received acknowledgement of being a, “Distinguished Unit with Academic Honors.”

  • Student Priyanka Velappan was recognized with the April Community Youth Award from Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA).
    Velappan was noted for being of an exemplary standard of behavior, extremely intelligent and respectful of her peers and adults.
    She also was complimented on high standards at the Science Fair, outstanding honesty, playing in the Honors Orchestra, being part of a leadership group, playing on the junior varsity tennis team and participating in the Super-computing Challenge.
    Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA) can be contacted at cya.org@att.net for nomination forms and donations.

  • The Los Alamos Garden Club invites anyone who is interested to come to a special rose pruning workshop at 10 a.m. Saturday at the Memorial Rose Garden, to learn all about the care and pruning of roses.  
    Carlos Valdez from the Los Alamos County Cooperative Extension Services Department will conduct a workshop demonstrating techniques and answering questions about growing roses here in our environment.  Be sure to wear long sleeves and bring pruning shears and gloves. Attendees will get hands-on experience helping the Los Alamos Garden Club prune the roses in the Memorial Rose Garden.  
    The workshop is free and sponsored by the Los Alamos Garden Club. For information, contact Judy Handy a JudyHandy@msn.com or 672-9414.

  • Calling all topiary and Avon aficionados: Tim Burton’s classic “Edward Scissorhands” (1990, PG-13) will screen at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Mesa Public Library.
    In this timeless story, earnest Avon lady Peg Bogg (Dianne Wiest), unable to sell to her friends, decides to try her luck at the scary castle at the end of the street. In it, she finds Edward (Johnny Depp), an artificial man created by a brilliant inventor (Vincent Price) who died before completing Edward’s hands. Therefore, his temporary appendages – several pairs of giant, old-fashioned scissors – remain.
    Peg brings poor Edward home with her, and he promptly transforms her boring, pastel neighborhood into a fantastical land of well-pruned dinosaurs and courageously-groomed dogs. The women, all bored housewives straight out of stereotypes of the 1950s, adore him. The men, who exit and re-enter their driveways simultaneously each day, accept him as one of the boys, despite all evidence to the contrary.
    Everything is wonderful until Edward proves himself slightly more human than they allow.