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Today's Features

  • Many dog owners have heard that socializing their puppy is important, but many do not know where to begin. It is important to show your puppy that not all people and animals pose a threat. Exposing your puppy to the world through proper socialization will help them develop into a social, obedient, and confident dog.
    The most critical socialization time for your puppy is between two and 12 weeks of age. During this time, it is important to expose your puppy to a variety of people, animals, and situations. Allowing your pet to experience these things early in life will prevent fear and aggression in the future. It will also promote your puppy’s obedience in critical scenarios. A puppy who trusts their owner that there is nothing to fear will more likely obey their owner without hesitation.
    Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained why it is important to socialize your puppy. “Socializing your puppy is important because it will enable them to be more at ease and focus on commands from you without distractions,” she said. “Socializing with a variety of people and animals also helps puppies develop socially without fear. It is also very important to socialize puppies with kittens and vice versa.”

  • Jan. 24-30, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    10 a.m.        Elder Financial Abuse talk
    10:30 a.m.        Advisory Council Meeting
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury Steak
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.         Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 p.m.        Lunch: Tilapia
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1 p.m.        “Friends” Meeting
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio Plus Exercise

  • LOS ALAMOS AP) — Bandelier National Monument officials are warning cross-country skiers and others going into forested areas of the Los Alamos-area monument to be aware of hazards from falling trees.
    Stewart Robertson of the monument’s staff says there’s been a dramatic increase of trees killed in the 2011 Las Conchas Fire breaking and falling, particularly on windy days but even on calm ones.
    Robertson says thousands of trees killed by the fire are now weak enough to fall in any direction.
    He also says limbs and branches fall without warning and that one falling tree may hit another and another domino-style.

  • SATURDAY
    Los Alamos Little Theatre presents “Once A Ponzi Time” at 7:30 p.m. at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar. Sly Investments and double-dealing abound in this hilarious madcap comedy. Tickets are available at CB Fox, BrownPaperTickets.com or at the door half an hour before curtain time. Visit lalt.org.

    Free lecture by Dr. Siegfried Hecker at 7 p.m. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 1967 18th St. Hecker will talk about “Doomed to Cooperate,” how American and Russian nuclear scientists joined forces to mitigate some of the greatest post Cold War dangers. Free to the public.
    SUNDAY
     Los Alamos Concert Association Presents “Chanticleer: Over the Moon” at 4 p.m. at the Duane Smith Auditorium. The San Francisco-based, Grammy award winning ensemble Chanticleer is known around the world as “an orchestra of voices” for the seamless blend of its 12 male voices, ranging from soprano to bass, and its original interpretations of vocal literature, ranging from Renaissance to jazz and popular genres. Tickets are $30 at CB Fox, Smith’s in Los Alamos and White Rock, Lensic; $35 at the door; or buy online at losalamosconcert.org or ticketssantafe.com Youth 6-18 are free.

  • Last Saturday, the two Los Alamos FIRST Technical Challenge robotics teams participated in New Mexico’s qualifier for the Arizona/New Mexico Regional Championship.  A total of 12 robotics teams competed at Menaul School in Albuquerque, comprised of teams from New Mexico, Arizona, and even Chihuahua Mexico, making this an international event.  
    The two Los Alamos teams, Hawks FTC, and a new rookie team, the Beta Hawks, went head to head in competition throughout the day, holding their own against the other teams.  
    While the Los Alamos veteran Hawks FTC team had trouble in their seeding matches, they rallied in their last seeding match to show what their robot could do and established the high score of the day.
    The Beta Hawks were organized this fall from seventh and eighth-grade Los Alamos students and had about eight weeks to design, build, program and field their robot.
    The Beta’s robot performed consistently throughout the day, winning the majority of its seeding matches. The team earned a fifth-place seed, and was selected as a valued alliance partner by the Magdalena N.M. Geek Bots for competition in the final matches.  

  • Colorado State University-Pueblo: Eric D. Schmalz, of Los Alamos was one of 991 named to the 2015 Dean's List with a minimum grade-point-average of 3.5.

    Hope College: Irene Gerrish and Michelle Boerigter, of Los Alamos, were named to the Dean’s list with a minimum 3.5 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale.

    Baylor University: Hannah Nicole Dye, of Los Alamos, a student of the College of Arts and Sciences, was named to the Dean’s Academic Honor Roll for the 2015 fall semester. She earned a minimum grade-point average of 3.7, while enrolled in a minimum of 12 semester hours. 

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) is offering a program to spend Saturday and Sunday birding at the Bosque del Apache with two expert birders and excellent teachers, David Yeamans and Mouser Williams.
    Yeamans has watched birds most of his life starting in Los Alamos many years ago, and in the last five years, he has been a birder of the type he calls “semi-pro.” He is active in Audubon bird counts, bird banding, field trips and local birding activities. He has been an outdoor educator all his life, especially as an Outward Bound instructor and BSA scout leader. He’s eager to share the lessons that observing nature brings to us.
    Williams organized the 2015 Los Alamos Christmas Bird Count. He is an avid birder and wildlife photographer. He has lived in Los Alamos for 13 years. When not enjoying the outdoors, he moonlights as an electrical engineer at LANL.
    More information about the trip itinerary, equipment, and logistics can be found on PEEC’s website, peecnature.org.
    To participate in the Bosque del Apache Birding Weekend, register online at peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460. Driving directions will be emailed out after registration.

  • TODAY
     The Los Alamos Mountaineers will have a meeting at 7 p.m. at Fuller Lodge that will include a presentation by Bill Priedhorsky, a Mountaineers member. A social and reports of recent and upcoming trips will start the evening at 7 p.m.

    The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board will meet at 6 p.m. in Building No. 1, Camino Entrada Road at the Pajarito Cliffs Site. David Daniel from Los Alamos High School and Michele Altherr from Mountain Elementary will be presenting on the XQ Super School Project.

    Green Hour hike at 10 a.m. Join other families for a kid-centered hike. Free.
    THURSDAY
    “Race to Nowhere” at 3:30 p.m. at the Teen Center. Youth Mobilizers from Los Alamos Teen Center will show the documentary film “Race to Nowhere” to their fellow teens.

    Watoto Concert at 8:30 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road. Beginning in 1994, Watoto Children’s Choir has been touring the world with orphaned children from Uganda, spreading the gospel through praise and worship.

    Historic Renovation and Expansion 2016 open community meeting from 5-6 p.m. in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Historical Museum project team will present Quatrefoil Associates’ concepts and design plans to date for the Guest Cottage and Bethe House.

  •  

    Performance > ‘Once a Ponzi Time’  plays Fridays and Saturdays through Jan. 30 with a 2 p.m. matinee Sunday

    What happens when a pyramid scheme collapses? When it involves an eager nephew, a ventriloquist father, a Russian hitman and a high-powered businessman, the answer is “comedy.”

    In “Once a Ponzi Time,” Harold Vanderdoff (Michael Adkins) is caught by his own pending financial ruin. With hours to go, he must come up with a clever new scheme with the help of his cheerful, if sometimes dimwitted, nephew Louie (Stuart Rupprecht). Hardly the arrogant, smirking pyramid mastermind, Harold is still a sympathetic character, a well-meaning financier who has made some bad choices. Worst of all, his own wife (Joy Reynolds) is also relying on his consistent 20 percent returns.

  • The Los Alamos Senior Centers will host two free performances of a brief play, “Swerving,” written by local playwright Robert F. Benjamin. It will be performed as a “concert reading” by Caroline (“Pip”) Evarts and John Gustafson, with Sally Cassil narrating. “Swerving” premiered during the 2015 8x10 Short-Play Festival at Los Alamos Little Theatre. Performances at senior centers this month use an expanded script with a run-time is 16 minutes.

    “Swerving” is a comedy is about how a codger’s wisdom, longing and congeniality transform a stormy confrontation with a policewoman into a moment of shared compassion.  

    The two performances will be:

    • White Rock Senior Center, 7 p.m. Thursday. White Rock Senior Center is temporarily located just east of Metzgers in the building formerly known as “The Hive.”

    • Betty Ehart Senior Center, 12:45 p.m. Jan. 27.  

     

    No reservations, but seating is limited for both shows.