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Today's Features

  • An updated fractal show will play in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium at 7 p.m.  Jan. 26 and the full-dome “Sea Monsters” film is screening at 2 p.m.
    The fractal show incorporates math, science, art and nature in a full-dome planetarium show featuring original music. “Sea Monsters” is a film that uncovers a time when prehistoric sea creatures come to life.
    For more information, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. To reserve tickets, call 662-0460.

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre Library Database Committee is looking for a donation to replace an approximately 15-year-old iBook G4 they’ve been using to maintain the group’s catalog of more than 1,600 plays. 

    The venerable iBook is on its last legs. Either a Mac or PC would be compatible with the database.

    Anyone who has a machine to donate or knows of one, can contact DS Magid at
    MagidMagidMagid@gmail.com, or Jim Sicilian at JimSicilian@comcast.net.

  • Today through April 4
    – Forest Explorers Hike and Play from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Get outside this winter by exploring with PEEC! This six-session class is for youth ages 5 to 8 and meets every other Wednesday. Admission: $135/non-member, $110/PEEC member. 

    THURSDAY

    Dr. Carmen Solano will be doing a Free Thyroid Seminar from 6-7 p.m. at the Los Alamos Project Y Conference room, from 6 Solano is a Medical Physician and a Functional Medicine Doctor. Space is limited so call 505-500-8356 to reserve a chair.

     

    Raspberry PI Club 7-8 p.m. at Los Alamos Makers, 3540 Orange St., Suite LV1. All levels are welcome. Get introduced to Raspberry Pis, get help with your Pi project and meet other Pi enthusiasts. Club facilitated by Akkana Peck, author of “Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi zero W; Controlling the world around you with a $10 computer.”

    FRIDAY

    High altitude baking presentation from 10-11 a.m. in the Fuller Lodge classroom, on the second floor. Free. Contact Desaree Jimenez from New Mexico State University at 662-2656 for information.

     

  • The Los Alamos County Animal Shelter employees just want to put this up front: Rando, an eight month old Manchester Terrier that’s up for adoption, loves to chew.

    Anything, including shoes and stuffed animals. Unfortunately, it was the reason he was given up.

    But, Rando is just a puppy, and according to employees at the animal shelter, he’s a fast learner. 

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter is hoping someone can train him out of his chewing habit with the right kind of attention.

    He just needs a forever home with some adults around to mind him.

    Rando loves children and other dogs. He has also been vaccinated and microchipped.

    Rando also walks well on a leash and is housetrained. Rando is all about playing, and is good at fetching – just make sure the toy isn’t a stuffed animal.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • Felipe Rodriguez says he thought he was hallucinating when an eagle snatched his sister’s little white dog from her yard, flapped its massive wings and disappeared over the trees.

    Did he really just see that?

    He had. Zoey the 8-pound bichon frise was gone, taken by a hungry raptor Tuesday afternoon not 50 feet from his sister’s house on the banks of the Lehigh River in Pennsylvania, Rodriguez said.

    “It seemed like something from the ‘Wizard of Oz,’” he told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “I’m a city boy. This doesn’t happen in my world.”

    Even more astonishing: Zoey would live to bark the tale.

    More on that later. But first, let it be said that eagles are quite capable of taking a small dog or a cat.

    “It has been documented before, but not that often,” said Laurie Goodrich, a biologist at nearby Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, a ridgetop preserve that annually records tens of thousands of migrating hawks, eagles and falcons.

    With food scarce and waterways freezing up, raptors are “looking a little more widely and taking advantage of whatever might be out there,” she said.

  • SUBMITTED TO THE MONITOR

    Students, small businesses and other community members and groups in northern New Mexico will benefit this year from a recent, nearly $1.9 million grant from Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), which is the managing and operating contractor for Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The LANS Board of Governors approved the funding through Oct. 1 to support education, economic development and community giving in the region.

    “The board’s decision continues their legacy of positive community support that totals $34.8 million since 2006,” said Laboratory Director Terry Wallace. “This commitment allows us to continue to work with organizations across the region, magnifying the impact of our employees generous support of nonprofits.”

    Funds approved by the LANS Board of Governors are administered through a Community Commitment Plan managed by the Laboratory’s Community Partnerships Office.

  • The Valle Grande Chapter, National Society Daughters of the American Revolution will meet on Feb. 10 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center from 10 a.m.-noon.

    This month’s program will feature the New Mexico State President, Children of the American Revolution, Samantha Streseman.

    Streseman will speak about her state project, and provide information about other NM C.A.R. activities.

    DAR is a service organization open to women who can prove descent from a Patriot during the American Revolution.
    For more information on the DAR, visit the National website dar.org.”

  • FRIDAY
    Gentle Walk
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    February Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty on our planetarium dome. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information atpeecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Feature Film: Black Holes at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Voyage through the galaxies in search of answers to explain the riddles of black holes! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SUNDAY
    Cowboy Breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road, near the stables. Cost is $7 for adults, $4 for children 10 years and under. Proceeds will benefit the Los Alamos Sheriff’s Posse.

    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 11:45 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre announces auditions for “The Dining Room” by A.R. Gurney, the final production of LALT’s 2017-18 season.

    Auditions will take place 2–5 p.m. Feb. 4, and 6:30–9:30 p.m. Feb. 5, at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.

    Auditioners are asked to prepare a short 1-2 minute monologue of their choice and will be asked to read scenes from the play. Copies of the script are available for check out at Mesa Public Library.

    The script calls for six adults (three women and three men) who each portray approximately nine varied characters. The production dates are May 11-12, 18-20 and March 25-26. The show is directed by Cindy Hines.

    The play is set in the dining room of a typical well-to-do household, the place where the family assembled daily for breakfast and dinner and for any and all special occasions. 

    The action is comprised of a mosaic of interrelated scenes – some funny, some touching, some rueful – which, taken together, create an in-depth portrait of a vanishing species: The upper-middle-class WASP.

    The actors change roles, personalities and ages with virtuoso skill as they portray a wide variety of characters, from little boys to stern grandfathers, and from giggling teenage girls to Irish housemaids.