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Today's Features

  • Bandelier National Monument, Valles Caldera National Preserve and Manhattan Project National Historical Park have announced that the National Park Service and other federal agencies will offer one more Fee Free Day this year on Thursday, Veterans Day.
    On that day, federal areas nationwide, including Bandelier and the Valles Caldera, will offer free admission to everyone. Manhattan Project NHP has no entry fee.
    Veterans Day began as Armistice Day, celebrating the end of World War I on Nov. 11, 1918. In 1954 it was officially renamed Veterans Day in the U.S. to expand it to honor all veterans, not just those who fought in World War I.  It still coincides with the Armistice Day holiday celebrated in many other countries. 
    As Bandelier Superintendent Jason Lott said, “Veterans Day is a very appropriate day for the parks to honor all our veterans, by inviting people all over the country to enjoy and celebrate the lands that these brave men and women have valiantly protected and defended.”  
    The Manhattan Project NHP is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and is closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.
    At Bandelier, the shuttle service has ended for this year, so visitors should just drive on down to the parking lot at the monument Visitor Center. 

  • The Santa Fe Symphony will ring in the holidays with “Carols and Choruses” in the majestic Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi Dec. 2.
    The audience will be able to sing along to some of the most beloved Christmas carols of all time as they enjoy the angelic voices of The Symphony Chorus, accompanied by the glorious sounds of The Symphony Brass and organ. This concert starts at 7 p.m. and is the symphony’s gift to the Santa Fe community during the holiday season.
    No tickets are required. Admission is free.
    The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi is located at 131 Cathedral Place in Santa Fe.
    Executive Director Gregory Heltman notes “members of The Symphony Brass are passionate about their instruments and music.” Over the years, the group has performed at many community and donor events as well as their holiday appearances at the Cathedral Basilica.

  • The Los Alamos Historical Society announced its 2016-2017 lecture series, “Multiple Perspectives of the Atomic Bomb.”
    Visit losalamoshistory.org for a listing and schedule of lectures and events.
    The lectures are at Fuller Lodge on the second Tuesday of the month at 7 p.m., unless noted otherwise.
    The Los Alamos Historical Society’s November lecture will feature a panel on the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, including the first Los Alamos appearance of new MPNHP Superintendent Kris Kirby.
    The lecture is set for 7 p.m. Nov. 15 at Fuller Lodge
    The Manhattan Project National Historical Park was established in November 2015 to preserve portions of three World War II sites where the United States developed the first atomic weapons.
    Managed in partnership with the Department of Energy, the three sites that make up the park are located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Los Alamos and Hanford, Washington.
    Kirby is a veteran National Park Service employee, most recently designated as permanent superintendent of the new park. She has extensive experience in NPS partnerships, including her most recent assignment at Yosemite National Park as chief of Business and Revenue Management. Before that, she served as chief of commercial services at Lake Mead National Recreation Area and previously worked in concessions management at Glacier National Park

  • JERUSALEM (AP) — In the innermost chamber of the site said to be the tomb of Jesus, a restoration team has peeled away a marble layer for the first time in centuries in an effort to reach what it believes is the original rock surface where Jesus’ body was laid.
    Many historians have long believed that the original cave, identified a few centuries after Jesus’ death as his tomb, was obliterated ages ago.
    But an archaeologist accompanying the restoration team said ground penetrating radar tests determined that cave walls are in fact standing — at a height of six feet and connected to bedrock — behind the marbled panels of the chamber at the center of Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
    “What was found,” said National Geographic archaeologist Fredrik Hiebert, “is astonishing.”
    The work is part of a historic renovation project to reinforce and preserve the Edicule, the chamber housing the cave where Jesus was entombed and resurrected. It is the centerpiece of one of Christianity’s oldest churches and one of its most important shrines.
    “I usually spend my time in Tut’s tomb,” said Hiebert about the Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun’s burial site, “but this is more important.”

  • Tax Help New Mexico and the IRS are seeking community volunteers across New Mexico and especially in the greater Albuquerque metropolitan area to provide free tax assistance to those who need help filing their taxes.
    Tax Help New Mexico volunteers serve in a variety of roles. Volunteers are needed to electronically file tax returns, greet taxpayers and help organize their paperwork, set up and keep running computer equipment used to electronically file tax returns, manage the tax site and do quality control.
    “Tax Help New Mexico needs fellow New Mexicans all across the state and at this time, from Albuquerque and near-by communities. We are looking for area volunteers who are interested in taking a little time to learn about taxes and then helping others by preparing federal and state income tax returns for free,” said IRS spokesperson, Liz Perea. “Volunteers are certified to prepare simple, non-business tax returns for people with low to moderate incomes. People of all ages and backgrounds are welcome to volunteer. There is a role for anyone who is interested, anyone who wants to help and give back to their community.”

  • Los Alamos Little Theatre will hold an open play reading of Tom Stoppard’s classic comedy “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead” at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Performing Arts Center.
    Acclaimed as a modern masterpiece, the play is the tale of Hamlet, as told from the worm’s-eye view of two minor characters in Shakespeare’s play.
    In Stoppard’s best-known work, the Shakespearean Laurel and Hardy finally get a chance to take the lead role, but do so in a world where reality and illusion intermix, and where fate leads the two characters to a tragic but inevitable end.
    Brief appearances of major characters from Hamlet, who enact fragments of the original play’s scenes, add to the bewilderment of the two protagonists, who voice their confusion at the progress of events occurring onstage without them in Hamlet.
    LALT will produce the play in the spring. The reading is an opportunity to gain familiarity with the script prior to auditions in February.
    Men and women of a wide age range are needed for the cast. John Cullinan will direct. John Gustafson is the producer.
    The Performing Arts Center is located at 1670 Nectar St. More information is available at LALT.org.

  • The New Mexico Department of Health has changed the hours of operation and services provided at the Los Alamos Public Health Office due to staffing changes.
    The clinic, located at 1183 Diamond Drive, No. D, in Los Alamos, will be open Tuesday through Friday from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (closed noon-1 p.m.) and will be closed Mondays.
    Services provided at this clinic will include children’s medical services (children and youth with special health care needs), and women, infants, and children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program. Services will be provided by appointment only.
     All other public health services are available at the Rio Arriba County Public Health Office located at 2010 Industrial Park Rd in Española. Appointments are also required at the Rio Arriba office.
    For more details, contact the Los Alamos Public Health Office at 662-4038 or the Rio Arriba Public Health Office at  753-2794.

  • TODAY

    Coffee Conversations from 4-5:15 p.m. at Smith’s Starbucks. The community is invited to join a weekly conversation about reimaging education in Los Alamos. This week’s meeting topic is:  Students Making the Right Choices. More information at odysseylosalamos.weebly.com or k.holmes@laschools.net.

    FRIDAY

    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. 

     

    Fourth Friday Fractals at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. See fractals in nature as a full-dome planetarium show! Cost is $10 for adults, $8 for children. 

     

    Trick–or–Treat on MainStreet will haunt downtown Los Alamos at 4 p.m. on Central Avenue, between 15th to 20th streets. 

     

    High Tech Halloween at the Bradbury Science Museum from 4-6:30 p.m. Interactive demonstration of a vacuum chamber, a simulated chain reaction using lights and optics and a “Critter Alley.” 

     

  • Oct. 24-Oct. 29

    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

     

     

    MONDAY

    8:45 a.m. Cardio

    9:45 a.m. Matter of Balance Class

    10 a.m. Advisory Council

    11:30 a.m. Lunch: Chicken Tenders 

    6 p.m. Argentine Tango Dancing

    7 p.m. Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY

    8:45 a.m. Variety Training

  • BY JAN MONTOYA
    jan@lamonitor.com