Today's Features

  • The Village of Jemez Springs is gearing up for a second attempt at its 2018 Cabin Fever Festival.

    A forecast of inclement weather forced postponement of the original date of Feb. 24. Now that a new date has been set organizers are anticipating better weather as they finalize preparations for the annual celebration.

    “Most weather reports were forecasting highs in the low 30s and gusty winds on the day of the event, so to be prudent and fair to our visitors and vendors, we postponed the event,” said Mayor Bob Wilson. “We apologize to those who had planned to attend our Cabin Fever Festival but we hope they will still attend (later this month).”

    The new date for Cabin Fever Festival is March 24 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

    The annual event includes a variety of fun activities, including chain saw carving demonstrations by Sandia Bear Company, a dog costume contest, pie-baking competition, live music and arts and crafts.

    “What we shoot for is a fun community event,” said Wilson. “We bring in some bands and have mostly local vendors. Some of the non-profit groups from the area participate and the forest service always shows up with some of their demonstrations. It’s just meant to be a fun community event.”

  • The Fuller Lodge Art Center has a long list of classes for students of all ages this spring.

    Many of the instructors have become a household name within the art community. This year, the center would like to introduce another fantastic artist and teacher, award-winning artist Roberta Remy, whose work can be found in corporate and private collections throughout the U.S., Brazil and Europe.

    Remy, who will be teaching an upcoming pastel course designed for adults and teens, attended Parsons School of Design, School of Visual Arts and the Art Students League of New York.

    There, she studied painting with master painters Frank Mason, George Passantino, David Leffel, and Sherrie McGraw, and drawing and anatomy with Robert Beverly Hale.

    Formerly a New York-based illustrator whose clients included Macmillan Publishing, Playskool, Cabbage Patch Kids and McDonalds, she now makes Santa Fe her home base, where she’s been expanding her teaching activities since 1995.

  • March is the perfect time to learn the tricks to extend the growing season for your garden. Natali Steinberg will teach everything you need to know to start and care for your veggies and annuals before the last frost from 1:30-3:30 p.m. March 18 at the Los Alamos Nature Center.

    This class will teach gardeners how to start seeds indoors, transplant successfully into the garden, and start some veggies directly in the garden.

    There will be handouts and demonstrations, but no seed planting during class.

    Steinberg has taught this class for 20 years at a nursery/greenhouse in Boulder. She had a large vegetable garden on her farm, and she sold produce at the Boulder Farmers Market. Steinberg also raised and sold bedding plants.

    The cost is $25, and Pajarito Environmental Education Center members save $5. Advance registration is required. To register or learn more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Santa Fe Pens is hosting the 23rd Annual Santa Fe Pen Fair from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and from noon-5 p.m. Sunday at the store located at DeVargas Center, 179 A, Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe.

    Following a 20-year run at the now-closed Sanbusco location, Santa Fe Pens, as part of the event, will unveil its Santa Fe Edition XX fountain and roller ball pens.

    “This year, we’re bringing back our free calligraphy seminars for children (age 8 and up) and adults. Our newest employee, Shawn Hayden, will teach basic calligraphy lettering techniques at 1:30 p.m. on both Saturday and Sunday,” said Neal Frank, Santa Fe Pens owner.

  • President Emeritus of Los Alamos National Laboratory and Stanford University Research Professor Dr. Sig Hecker will be the guest speaker at an elegant dinner and talk set for 5:30-8:30 p.m. March 19 at Las Campanas Clubhouse, 132 Clubhouse Dr., Santa Fe.

    Seating is limited at this event and reservations are required by March 16.

    Hecker will offer his thoughts and opinions on the exclusive “nuclear club,” focusing on North Korea, Russia, and the Iran deal among many other urgent issues in a presentation entitled, “A Tour of the Nuclear World.”

    Hecker is an internationally recognized expert in plutonium science, global threat reduction and nuclear security.

    As discussed recently on 60 Minutes, Hecker has made some extraordinary visits to North Korea to assess its plutonium programs and advances in nuclear weapons – a development that now directly threatens the United States.

    Hecker is a professor in the Department of Management Science and Engineering and a senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI). He was co-director of Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC) from 2007-2012. From 1986 to 1997, Dr. Hecker served as the fifth Director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  • Richard Cahal Thompson, Santa Fe parks division director will give a free talk during the Santa Fe Chapter of the Native Plant Society of New Mexico meeting at Christ Lutheran Church at 6:30 p.m. March 21.

    The talk is entitled “The Face of Change.” It concerns the possibility of planting more native plants in Santa Fe.
    Cahal earned a bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from TAMU Kingsville. Upon graduation, he moved into municipal forestry with the City of San Antonio.

    He was then promoted to River Walk horticulturist, River Operations supervisor, horticulturist II, and then senior horticulturist.  Since leaving San Antonio, he worked as a contract Forester, Urban Forester, parks superintendent, project manager, and is now parks division director in Santa Fe.

     The meeting will be held at Christ Lutheran Church, at 1701 Arroyo Chamiso, located in the triangle of Old Pecos Trail, St. Michael’s Drive and Arroyo Chamiso. It is directly across the street from Fire Station No. 4. Meetings and talks are free and open to all. For more information, email Dr. Tom Antonio: tom@thomasantonio.org or call 690-5105.

  • Audubon New Mexico announced March 1 the appointment of Paul Tashjian as Associate Director of Freshwater Conservation.

    Tashjian will further bolster Audubon New Mexico’s innovative freshwater conservation program to address the many challenges the state is facing regarding significant declining river flows, and the impact it has on birds, wildlife and New Mexicans.

    Tashjian, a longtime resident of New Mexico, will lead Audubon New Mexico’s multi-faceted Freshwater Conservation Program along with Beth Bardwell, Director of Conservation effective March 5, 2018. He will direct efforts to develop and implement policy, market-based, restoration and strategic engagement strategies to protect and restore natural ecosystems for communities, birds and other wildlife on New Mexico’s major rivers and tributaries, with a focus on the Rio Grande and Colorado River Basins.

    “I’m very excited to be working with Audubon New Mexico on water and wildlife conservation issues, said Paul Tashjian. “I love our State’s rivers and wetlands and have spent much of my time stomping around these magical places.”

  • Los Alamos Commerce and Development Corporation has announced that Liz Martineau is the new Creative District Curator, effective at the end of February.

    Martineau has worked for the Los Alamos Public Schools, the Bradbury Science Museum and has either taught or volunteered at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, History Museum and Nature Center. She serves on the board for Los Alamos Makers and is part of the community effort to open Polaris Charter School in Los Alamos.

    “Los Alamos is a vibrant community devoted to art, science, history, and nature, and I am excited to bring these together to provide new opportunities and to enrich our downtown.” Martineau said.\

    The Los Alamos Creative District provides programs, including the “On Tap” lecture and libations series and “Tuesdays at the Pond” summer entertainment series.

  • The Los Alamos County Community Services Department wrapped up their collaborative 100 Days of Winter program on Feb. 26.

    Over 1,000 programming guides were distributed throughout Los Alamos County between November and February, encouraging residents and visitors to get out and active during the winter months.

    With just under 200 online participants, and over 260 entries for the grand prize, many shared photos of the wide variety of ways they were inspired to stay local and enjoy all the Los Alamos area has to offer.

    Congratulations to our grand prize winner Danna Pelland! Danna won a package of local goodies worth over $950.

    Special to the Monitor

    We here in Los Alamos are so lucky to live in a town that has such a close connection to the amazing abundance of wildlife New Mexico has to offer. One of the greatest opportunities I have had is to be a champion and advocate for the amazing wildlife rehabilitators here in New Mexico.

    I have done this as both a volunteer and chairman of Land of Enchantment Wildlife Foundation. These individuals, like Los Alamos’s own Dr. Kathleen Ramsay, have dedicated their lives to caring for the wildlife of New Mexico.

    There is one story that is special to my heart. Blue Beary was the first bear I accepted by myself, and she holds a special place in my heart! Blue Beary came into Ramsay’s care a mere 6 pounds, and with as badly broken arm.

    Partnering with Veterinary Care Hospital in Albuquerque and donations from all over the country (including many from Los Alamos), Ramsay was able to give Blue Beary what she needed to heal and to grow to over 65 pounds.

    Blue Beary was released back into wild late 2017, where we hope she found a cozy den for the winter. If successful, she will come out of the den around May and begin the journey all bears must make. The journey to become fat.