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Today's Features

  • Aug. 7-13
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken Enchilada
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.         Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Eggplant & Pasta
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge (Classroom)
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio Plus Exercise    
    10:30 a.m.        Music with Ruth
    10:30 a.m.        AARP Meeting    
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Grilled Pork Chop

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Monroe, Sam, Jobin, Mudpie, Fireball, and Popsicle—Recently transferred to the shelter from a high-kill New Mexico shelter. They are all young, rambunctious, and ready to steal her new owners’ heart! Popsicle is a gorgeous, all-white longhaired Turkish angora with stunning blue eyes and a heart of gold. Monroe is a shorthaired all-white kitty with one green eye and one blue eye. This sweetie would love to snuggle all day if given the chance. Jobin should have been named Fireball! This little tabby loves to play, and he gets along well with other cats. Sam, Mudpie and Fireball were all at the vet, so the shelter report writer hasn’t met them yet, but potential adopters can stop in to say hi!

  • The movie “Granite Mountain” will be shooting a large scene in Los Alamos on Aug. 5 and is seeking paid extras to work in the film.
    The production, starring Josh Brolin, Jeff Bridges and Miles Teller, is the story of the real-life Granite Mountain Hotshots, an elite group of wildland firefighters that courageously battled one of the worst wildfires in history to save an Arizona town.
    The production is looking for men, women and children, dogs and cats, people with horse trailers and boats and cars.  
    The crew is casting police officers, fire fighters and families evacuating their homes. Email a photo with name, height, weight and phone number to egabelcasting@gmail.com. Put Los Alamos in the subject line. Also include the year, color and make of your car.

  • The Santa Fe National Forest lifted campfire and smoking restrictions Thursday after widespread rain across the forest and fire danger decreased. The forest implemented Stage I fire restrictions on July 15 based on dry conditions and higher-than-normal temperatures.
    Forest managers use several criteria to determine when to lift fire restrictions, including current and predicted weather, fuel moisture, fire activity levels and available firefighting resources. The arrival of monsoonal moisture has eased the dry conditions that led to restrictions and decreased fire danger to moderate.
    Although Stage I restrictions on campfires and smoking will be lifted, forest managers urge visitors to continue to use caution around campfires and other potential ignition sources by following campfire safety procedures.

  • The Valles Caldera National Preserve is offering a reward for information about the recent theft of firefighting equipment.
    Special agents with the Investigative Services Branch and U.S. Park Rangers of Valles Caldera National Preserve are seeking information about the recent theft of crucial wildland firefighting equipment, apparently taken between 6 p.m. July 23 and 11 a.m. July 24.
    According to investigators, someone forcibly entered a closed area in the preserve, broke into several storage units and stole a significant amount of equipment that is part of the National Park Service firefighting program.
    The items taken include a utility task vehicle, an equipment trailer, drip torches, fuel cells, gas cans, tools, pumps, generators and compressors.
    The wildland fire crew using the equipment was working on the Big Hat Fire in the preserve when the theft occurred. The crew had recently returned from the Dog Head Fire in Albuquerque and from other fire assignments in New Mexico and Arizona.
    The loss of this equipment will impact interagency firefighting operations in northern New Mexico for the rest of the year, according to National Park officials.

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Passport to the Pajarito Plateau program has had a tremendous start this summer, with some 2,000 hikes reporters in the first few months.
    This popular program is a way to get families outside, exploring the trails together, according to PEEC’s spokeswoman Sandra West.
    The program is a partnership between PEEC, Los Alamos County, Bandelier, and the Valles Caldera with generous support from the Delle Foundation.
    Hikers that use the program enjoy the trails in the passport, which are also included in PEEC’s free Los Alamos Trails app for iOS and Android operating systems, and look for a wooden post with a specially designed rubbing plate.
    Each trail has its own custom-designed plate, with artwork by Heather Ward. When the hikers find the post, they make a crayon rubbing of the plate to “stamp” their passports.  After two, five, eight, 12 and 16 hikes, they bring their passports to the PEEC Nature Center to record the hikes on the giant bar graph and receive their prizes.
    Children are especially fond of the whistle/compass combination that they receive for two hikes, and adults love the bandana printed with all the Los Alamos trails that is the prize for 8 hikes, West said in a release about the program.

  • The Los Alamos Faith & Science Forum concludes its summer series on the topic “What Makes Us Human?”at 6 p.m. today at Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.
    Dinner will be at 6 p.m., with a presentation at 6:30 p.m. and discussion at 7 p.m. Talks are aimed at a general audience. All are welcome. Follow our blog at lafsf.org.
    Today’s topic is “The Whole Person.” Scientists, philosophers and theologians have developed models of humankind that vary from a whole person to dualism to tricotomies. Gerry Wood came to Los Alamos after completing a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2004 he retired after 35 years at LANL, working mostly in health and safety areas. For more information see GerryOWood.com.

  • TODAY
    Chamber Business After Hours from 5:30-7 p.m. at projectY cowork Los Alamos. RSVP Requested: losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com.

    Summer Family Evenings: Wildland Fire Fighters at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. See inside a fire fighter’s truck! Del Norte Credit Union sponsors this evening of family fun.  Cost is $5 for non-member families and free for PEEC member families.

    The United Thrift Shop at 2545 Canyon Road is having a half price sale on everything but jewelry today.
    THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga at the nature center with Christa Tyson, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members and $12 for PEEC members. 

    NM FAST SBIR/STTR Proposal Workshop Webinar (USDA Focus) from 1-3 p.m. at projectY cowork Los Alamos.
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks from 8:30 a.m.- noon at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Young at Heart Hike at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join us on a hike that brings together people of all ages to connect, learn, play, and explore. Free.

  • We have heard a lot in the last few weeks about people taking the lives of others in public situations.
    It seems we want to be able to blame terrorism, and perhaps that is because it is easier than addressing some of the serious issues that exist right here at home.
    When we have situations dealing with American-born offenders, it is something different. We try to label some events as domestic terrorism, but some situations are different.
    If our youth or young adults are so disenfranchised they are driven to such horrific outcomes, what if it could be that, on occasion, there is no one to blame but ourselves?
    I am talking about situations not related to ISIS, and I preface this column with the fact that I am not a counselor.
    However, I feel some things need to be addressed before we become one of those communities in the same situation.
    It is no secret about my devotion to the 40 Developmental Assets. I think we have many youth and adults for that matter that need some.
    Everyone has some baggage in their lives. People of all ages are dealing with things great and small. If someone seems a little off, please reach out to them, even if it is by offering resources from an organization or agency that isn’t you.