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Today's Features

  • Art exhibits
    Footprints: The Inspiration and Influence of Allan Houser. Through May 2015 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 708 Camino Lejo in Santa Fe.

    Artist Julia Roberts: Etchings & Collagraphs at New Concept Gallery, 610 Canyon Road in Santa Fe. Show runs until June 1.

    Jock Sturges: Fanny. Show runs until Saturday at photo-eye Gallery.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces “Creating Shape.” Zane Bennett Contemporary Art will unveil to the public for the first time the latest acquisitions. The exhibition will feature works by Karen Yank. The opening will be 5-7 p.m. May 29. Show runs until June 19.

    The photo-eye Gallery in Santa Fe announces two concurrent exhibitions, “Emergent Behavior” by Thomas Jackson and “Home by Nightfall” by Angela Bacon Kidwell. Opening reception from 5-7 p.m. May 29. This is the first exhibition by both artists at photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. Show runs until July 4.

    “Echoes of Nature.” Patty Hammarstedt-Abstract Calligraphy/Mixed Media Painting Ceramics Artists: Jack Troy, Rob Barnard, Lucien Koonce, Susan Kotulak and Kevin Crowe. First Friday Citywide Event and Pre-View Artist Reception from 5-8:30 p.m. June 5.

  • Beginning in late May, master pianist and storyteller Richard Glazier will be featured in a new PBS special, his third for the network.
    Recorded in 2014, “From Broadway to Hollywood with Richard Glazier” features Glazier’s piano talents as well as interviews with several artists having connections to the Golden Age of music. The program airs on PBS stations around the country, including KNME TV on May 31.
    “It will continue to air on PBS affiliates over the next three years and I’ll be appearing during the pledge drives,” said Glazier, who lives in Sacramento, California.
    Unlike most conventional concert pianists, Glazier draws on his background and connections with legendary figures in American Popular Song, such as Ira Gershwin, to blend recitals with stories of artists who influenced his career.
    “I’ve always told interesting stories about the composers, the performers, the shows, the movies—they all enhance the concert experience,” Glazier said. “I also add audio/visual components showing rare clips, photos and interviews that I’ve done.”

  • TOURISM Santa Fe, the Santa Fe University of Art and Design (SFUAD), and creative advertising agency Fuseideas announce a new collaborative, yearlong intern program. The program offers internships in photography, writing and film, and provide students with exposure to top industry professionals. Students will also participate in hands-on opportunities, working at the nexus of a leading destination marketing organization and a creative agency, branding and sharing the unique experiences of Santa Fe to a variety of international audiences.
    Throughout the program, SFUAD interns will interact with agency managers and creatives, shadow professional photography and video shoots, and present and create content to be published on TOURISM Santa Fe social media platforms, paid media executions and santafe.org. These hands-on experiences provide invaluable career insights and enable students to develop portfolios for professional employment after graduation.
    “Santa Fe is a city of preeminent creative talent,” said Javier Gonzales, Mayor of Santa Fe. “The SFUAD internship program is the latest in our ongoing efforts to develop and retain local talent by delivering the national exposure and growth opportunities young people need to help tourism and other leading industries excel.”

  • Bradbury part of Blue Star program

    The Bradbury is again partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families Foundation and the Department of Defense in the Blue Star Museums program to host active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day, May 25 through Labor Day Sept. 7.
    “We are excited and proud to be a part of the 2,000 museums throughout the United States participating in the Blue Star Museum program to thank our nation’s military personnel — and their families — for their service. The museum already has a free-admission policy, but we’re participating in this program to raise awareness of the importance of honoring members of the U.S. armed services, as we share our collective history,” said Bradbury Science Museum Director Linda Deck.
    Blue Star Museums are more than 2,000 museums nationwide that offer free admission to active duty military personnel, including National Guard and Reserve, as well as their families, from Memorial Day through Labor Day.
    For a full list of participating museums nationwide, visit arts.gov/bluestarmuseums.

    Puppy adoption set for this weekend

  • Piñon Park Pool has memberships available for the 2015 season. The pool, located at 104 Bryce Ave., has been a part of the White Rock community for 49 years.
    The pool offers three types of memberships based upon number of swimmers. A one-person membership cost $200 and includes five guest passes. A two-person membership is $325 plus 10 guest passes. A family membership is $450 guest packages and includes 20 guest passes.
    Current members who refer a new member will receive a $50 credit toward his or her 2016 assessment for each referral.
    The pool features a covered lounge area, tables and grill for picnic, a shaded kiddy pool area, play area and snack bar.
    It offers lane swimming, water aerobics and late night swims every Wednesday, as well as special theme night and other activities throughout the summer.
    On July 4, the pool will host a members-only party, including games and prizes for the kids, a diving contest and the famous greased watermelon contest between members and staff.
    Swim lessons are being held the weeks of June 8-12, June 22-26, July 6-10 and July 20-24 for all levels for both members and non-members.
    The cost is $30 per swimmer for members and $40 per swimmer for non-members. Private lessons are available upon request.

  • The Rotary Deborah Beene Music Awards auditions last week at Fuller Lodge.  
    The committee of judges included Cindy Little, Charlene Cox-Clifton, Rotarians Brian Newnam, Mandy Marksteiner and Ed Van Eeckhout.  
    Nine students participated, with performances ranging from voice to strings, woodwinds to percussion.
    The winners were: First place, $1,200 — Michelle Yang, violin (teacher Kay Newnam). Second place, $800 — Caitlin Dahl, cello (teacher Dana Winograd). Third place tie, $300 each — Jennifer Necker, oboe (teacher Aaron Lewis). Catherine Runnels, soprano (teacher Nathan Salazar).
    The Deborah Beene account provided $1,000.
    Another $1,000 was given by the Rotary Club of Los Alamos and the remaining funds were provided through private donation.
    The Rotary Deborah Beene Music Awards program was established in the memory of Deborah Beene, daughter of Donald and Sara Beene, a violin and piano student who died in December 1973 while enrolled in school here. The awards are intended to assist students in their musical growth.
    The 9th-12th grade LAHS students may compete.

  • Today
    Grief support group. 6:30 p.m. in the lounge of the United Church. All members of the community are welcome. For more information, visit uceducation@unitedchurchla.org, or call 662-2971.

    The Western Landowners Alliance: Stewardship with Vision. 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. The WLA is a voice for conservation-minded landowners across the West. They work to ensure private and leased public lands and waters in the West are healthy and resilient to environmental and developmental stressors. Executive Director Leslie Allison will talk about WLA’s goals and work. Free. losalamosnature.org.

    The Los Alamos Photo Club (LAPC) meets from 7-9 p.m., the third Tuesday of each month, upstairs in Fuller Lodge Art Center. The focus of LAPC is photography in general. LAPC normally has one or two field trips per year and occasionally sponsors workshops and classes. All are welcome. Dues are $12 per year and are good for the Los Alamos Adobe Users Group. For more information email Doug at dfcoombs@comcast.net.
    Wednesday

  • The Los Alamos Little Theatre will be having a play reading for the classic tale, “Harvey,” which kicks off the 2015-16 season in September.
    Readings will be 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Green Room at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.
    Elwood P. Dowd insists on including his friend Harvey in all of his sister Veta’s social gatherings. Trouble is, Harvey is an imaginary, 6-1/2 foot tall rabbit.
    To avoid future embarrassment for her family — and especially for her daughter, Myrtle Mae — Veta decides to have Elwood committed to a sanitarium.
    At the sanitarium, a frantic Veta explains to the staff that her years of living with Elwood’s hallucination have caused her to see Harvey also, and so the doctors mistakenly commit her instead of her mild-mannered brother.
    The truth comes out, however, Veta is freed, and the search is on for Elwood, who eventually arrives at the sanitarium of his own volition, looking for Harvey.
    But it seems that Elwood and his invisible companion have had a strange influence on more than one of the doctors.
    Only at the end does Veta realize that maybe Harvey isn’t so bad after all.

  • PAC 8 Community Media Center is offering 18 video classes this summer.
    The classes are a new addition this year that PAC 8 will be partnering with PEEC in six of its video sessions.
    In the “Outdoor Fun” classes, kids will show their point of view about favorite outdoor locations around Los Alamos.
    The videos from each class will be combined into a short “Los Alamos Welcomes You” film to be projected in the nature center’s planetarium on a continuous basis.
    Participants will be involved in various aspects of video production (acting, camera operation, voice-overs, audio and editing).
    Each participant will receive a PEEC T-shirt and DVD of the film. “Outdoor Fun” classes cost $110. An anonymous donor is offering two half-tuition scholarships, based on need, for the “Outdoor Fun” classes.
    PAC 8 is also offering classes in 2-D and 3-D animation, logic music production, GoPro and Drone classes, Google Earth and music videos.
    The first two sessions of the summer classes will be shot at the The Nature Center where the kids will create a short documentary on the new Center.
    These classes cost $90. Pay for classes at least two weeks before they start.
    Class size is limited to six students per teacher.

  • My column this week is about a variety of assets. You can pick one or try to do them all: family support, positive family communication, caring school climate, caring for others.
    I would like everyone to understand the stress on youth and school staff as the year winds down. I just want to take a minute and give a nod to school staff and how hard this year in particular is with PARCC, final exams, end of course, etc.
    However, my main focus this week is on youth and how we as a community need to step up for the next two weeks. We need to understand the pressure, real or perceived, we need to be understanding, we need to have conversations around fun stuff that doesn’t involve academics.
    It doesn’t matter if you have school-aged kids or not, you too can step up and be a support system. Pass a kid on the sidewalk, look them in the eye and say hello, how’s it going, almost summer.
    The song by A Great Big World, “Say Something,” keeps coming to mind.
    Tensions are high and the troops are restless. I see it in people of all ages, not just the kids. I see crabby adults, people that need to tell you every grumpy thing on their mind. No matter how much you try and persuade yourself that your poor attitude isn’t or doesn’t rub off on the children, you are mistaken.