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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico who was recently surrendered. She is still adjusting to life at the shelter; as a result, she is a bit timid and shy. Shelter volunteers will continue working with Cupcake to bring out her fun side, and she’ll be ready for adoption in no time!
    Marshall — A 1-year-old, orange tabby, who was found roaming earlier this week. He’s really hoping that his family comes for him, but if not, he’ll head to the vet for a check-up before he heads home with a new family.

  • Lee Powell, a former Los Alamos resident, has been named the winner of the Edward R. Murrow Award, considered one of the biggest awards in the broadcast news world.
    For Powell, three times is the charm.
    Powell works as a video journalist for The Washington Post.
    “For a newspaper, it shows our work can stand alongside other papers like The New York Times,” Powell said.
    His first win was for a compilation of pieces, as well as a feature that was about a fake ski slope in Virginia. He was working as a broadcast reporter for The Associated Press at the time, in 2011 and 2012 respectively.
    This upcoming award is for also writing a collection of stories from 2014 — about a newspaper publisher, a D-Day veteran and a collector of one of the largest pinball collections around.
    Powell was born in Dallas and moved to Los Alamos in 1989 while in the seventh grade. His mother, Irene, recently retired from being the director of the Los Alamos Volunteer Association and his father, David, worked for the Los Alamos National Laboratory for many years.
    Powell is a 1994 graduate from Los Alamos High School.
    He went onto college in Wheaton College in Illinois, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in political science.

  • It has been a banner year for former Los Alamos resident James Carothers and his family.
    After landing a booking agent in Nashville, Tennessee, in January, he is one step closer to becoming a bona fide country music artist.
    Carrie Moore-Reed from Third Coast Talent is his agent, while his wife, Jill, has been assisting with booking venues for James.
    “It’s an uphill battle for any artist,” Jill Carothers said.
    James opens for bands in the Nashville area in country-themed bars and clubs. A possible gig in Washington state is in the works, but has not been finalized.
    In April, he played a Battle of the Bands at The Crazy Bull in Macon, Georgia. That performance is available on YouTube. He also plays at the Bluebird Café in Nashville.
    James scored a full-time gig at the start of the summer when he walked into the George Jones Museum and Entertainment Complex.
    The four-story location houses a museum, bar and restaurant, and an additional rooftop terrace bar that over looks the Cumberland River and the Tennessee Titans football stadium.
    The facility makes its own moonshine on the premises, as well.
    James first heard of an opening through one of his current band members who thought he would be a good fit for the gig.

  • Los Alamos has a slew of high school students who have accomplished much in their young lives — EliseAnne Koskelo is one of them.
    Last school year, as a junior at Los Alamos High School, Koskelo was the recipient of several prestigious awards for her work in art, design and science.
    Back in December, Koskelo was awarded a Merit designation from the National Young Arts Foundation for her work blending art and science. Her portfolio was chosen from more that 11,000 applications from across the United States.
    As one of 700 winners of this award, Koskelo travelled to New York City recently to attend master classes in the field of art and design. She received a travel scholarship from the Emily Bradley Memorial Fund and she thanks Linda Zwick and family for their support of education in the arts.
    Koskelo said she first heard about Young Arts through LAHS teacher Margo Batha. “When I applied, I submitted a portfolio which contained pictures and descriptions of my architectural, engineering and fashion design works,” Koskelo said. “I also wrote an essay about the power of design, focusing on my reaction to the Korean War Memorial in Washington, D.C.”
    She was a part of the DuPont essay contest, which she discovered Googling various science competitions.

  • Which site has 50,000 volunteer-logged petroglyphs? What is the largest petroglyph site in North America? The answer to both of these questions is Mesa Prieta, an amazing archaeological treasure just in our own backyard. To learn more about this fascinating area and unique nonprofit, come hear Katherine Wells, founder of Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, discuss her work. She will show petroglyphs from the Archaic, Puebloan and Historic periods, and answer questions about the volunteer organization that helps oversee and protect this important site.

    The Wells Petroglyph Preserve was created in 2007 when Katherine Wells donated 156 acres on Mesa Prieta to The Archaeological Conservancy. Katherine purchased the petroglyph-rich land on the mesa in 1992.  She had the vision for a preservation and educational effort for Mesa Prieta and the determination to develop a program dedicated to its protection. An additional 25 acres were added to the Wells Petroglyph Preserve in 2014, bringing the total protected area to 181 acres.

    This presentation will be 7 p.m. Tuesday at Los Alamos Nature Center at 2600 Canyon Road. It is free to attend, and no registration is required. For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit www.peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Well, we are officially back to school. This year more than any other, I understand why we start on a Thursday, because by Friday, both young and old were just plain exhausted. It is a nice ease back into the routine.
    Now that the public schools are underway, it will soon be time for families to send their college students back or off for the first time.
    I always feel it is my moral obligation to publically praise University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, the “Community College Feel with the University Appeal.” The number of kids who stayed local might surprise you.
    After a year at UNM-LA, the Lauritzen family has sent our 2014 Los Alamos High School graduate off to main campus and a new home away from home.
    I confess, I wept like a baby! That’s right, you would have thought he was flying to the other side of the world, but he’s no longer at home and only in Albuquerque. I felt bad that he had to endure it, but he knew it was coming the day after he walked that ’Topper stage.
    It was kind of hard for me to grasp why such emotion at even the thought of it, when he’s only an hour and a half away.

  • Recurring meetings
    Note: If any of the following listings need to be changed or removed, contact Gina Velasquez immediately at lacommunity@lamonitor.com, or 662-4185, ext. 21.

    The Atomic City Corvette Club meets at 6 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at Time Out Pizza in White Rock. For more information, contact Chris Ortega at 672-9789.

    The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays; and from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, lower level. On Tuesday, there is a fee of $2 per player. There is no charge on Saturday. For more information, contact Avadh Saxena at AVADH—S@hotmail.com or Ed Stein at 662-7472.

    The Lions Club meets at 84 Barcelona in White Rock on the first and third Thursdays. For more information, call 672-3300 or 672-9563.

    The Rotary Club of Los Alamos meets at noon every Tuesday at the golf course, 4250 Diamond Dr. Guest speakers every week.  

    Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos meets Tuesdays from Noon-1 p.m. at Trinity on the Hill Church in Kelly Hall.  

  • For the 70th Anniversary of the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the protest group Campaign Nonviolence decorated the Ashley Pond stage with paper cranes. Nearly 70,000 cranes were put up by group members to offer peace

  • All concerts in St. Francis Auditorium in the New Mexico Museum of Art unless otherwise noted.
    6 p.m. today
    Mozart Piano Quartet No. 1 in G Minor, K. 478
    William Preucil, violin; Hsin-Yun Huang, viola; Eric Kim, cello; Ran Dank, piano
    Ruders Cha Cha Cha
    David Tolen, percussion
    Brahms Piano Quartet No. 2 in A Major, Op. 26
    illiam Preucil, violin; Hsin-Yun Huang, viola; Eric Kim, cello; Ran Dank, piano
    Tickets: $10-$72
    Noon Thursday
    Soyeon Kate Lee piano recital
    Brahms Intermezzo in A Major, Op. 118, No. 2
    Brahms Piano Sonata No. 2 in F-sharp Minor, Op. 2
    DeBussy Three Preludes from Book I. L. 117
    Ravel La valse
    Tickets: $10-$26
    6 p.m. Thursday
    Mozart Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat Major, K. 493
    William Preucil, violin; Hsin-Yun Huang, viola; Eric Kim, cello; Ran Dank, piano
    Wallin Stonewave
    Jeffrey Cornelius, percussion; Scott Ney, percussion; David Tolen, percussion
    Brahms Piano Quartet No. 3 in C Minor, Op. 60
    William Preucil, violin; Hsin-Yun Huang, viola; Eric Kim, cello; Ran Dank, piano
    Tickets: $10-$72
    6 p.m. Friday
    David Starobin Guitar Recital
    Matiegka Sonata in E Minor, Op. 31, No. 4
    Matiegka Menuetto (Presto), Op. 20, No. 10

  • Los Alamos
    China Moon, 121 Central Park Square
    Date Inspected: July 28
    Violations: All violations have been corrected.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. Follow up from July 22.

    Java City Coffee Booth, TA-55
    Date Inspected: July 31
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    TA-55 Cafeteria, TA-55
    Date Inspected: July 31
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Giant No. 6380, 2373 Trinity Dr.
    Date Inspected: Aug. 12
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.