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Today's Features

  • TODAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    March Night Sky Show from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    Coro de Camara to perform at 7 p.m. at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road in Los Alamos. Northern New Mexico’s premiere chamber chorus sings a Broadway concert with highlights from “Les Miserables” and a tribute to Stephen Sondheim. Tickets at the door are a suggested donation of $20 for adults and $10 for students. Visit corodecamara-nm.org.
    SATURDAY
    Saturday and Sunday: Drawing and Painting Natural Forms (2 day class) from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy botanical drawing and watercolor with Santa Fe artist Lisa Coddington. Cost is $48 for members, $60 for non-members.

    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SUNDAY
    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • Summit Garden Club will hold its monthly meeting at 1:30 p.m. Monday at the White Rock Library, and will feature a talk and slide show on the flora and fauna of Mongolia.  
    Summit member Bev Cooper and her husband Martin traveled to Mongolia in the Summer of 2015 with the goal of seeing white neck cranes, demoiselle cranes, argali sheep an ibex.  
    The Coopers saw all of these, and experienced a new culture. The public is welcome to attend the talk.
    Also, White Rock Library Director Veronica Encinas will speak about the development and implementation of the plan to landscape the White Rock Library and Teen Center area in a way that would use native plants for greenery and use water wisely.
    For more information, call Shelby at 662-2625.

  • BY KELLY DOLEJSI
    Special to the Monitor

  • Saint Job of Pochaiv Orthodox Christian Church will host Blini Breakfast from 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
    Traditional blini, a type of thin pancake, will be served in the traditional style with smoked salmon, herring, butter and sour cream. Vegetable caviar, eggs, cheese and a variety of berry preserves will also be available.
    Blini are traditionally served in Slavic households during the week before the beginning of the Lenten Fast.
    The thin, crepe-like pancakes are eaten together with fish, sour cream and butter in order to consume all these foods before the beginning of Great Lent.
    These foods – that is, fish and dairy products, along with meat – are not eaten during the 40-day Great Fast period preceding Easter or Pascha, as it is called among Orthodox Christians.
    The practice of fasting, or abstaining from certain foods, dates to Judaism. The practice was recorded in Biblical times, Christ having fasted in the desert for 40 days.
    “Lent” comes from the ancient English word for spring – that  time of natural rebirth which corresponds to the process of inner spiritual regeneration, which every Christian should strive to experience in his or her preparation for celebrating the feast of Christ’s Resurrection.

  • Belisama Irish Dance School will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St., Los Alamos.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets are $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with four or more members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  •  Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center March 4 and 5.
    This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is appropriate for all skill levels to refine skills and enjoy the creative process.
    The workshop will run from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. March 4, and 1-4 p.m. March 5.
    Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, nature-inspired art.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy-to-understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Codedington will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students are required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by March 1. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist-instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.

  • The community is invited to enjoy a lunchtime performance by Brave New Brass during the Brown Bag Lunch March 1 at Fuller Lodge.
    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations, and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos since 2012.
    Members of the group are all local Los Alamos musicians, with Elizabeth Hunke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone). \As an applied mathematician at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Hunke develops and maintains the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE, which is used in numerous climate-modeling centers around the world. In her spare time she plays horn with several Los Alamos ensembles, and she is active in the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots that provides scholarship opportunities for women and aviation education in the community.

  • By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

  • BOSTON (AP) — In a Mexican cave system so beautiful and hot that it is called both Fairyland and hell, scientists have discovered life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old.
    The bizarre and ancient microbes were found dormant in caves in Naica, Mexico, and were able to exist by living on minerals such as iron and manganese, said Penelope Boston, head of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute. .
    “It’s super life,” said Boston, who presented the discovery Friday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston.
    If confirmed, the find is yet another example of how microbes can survive in extremely punishing conditions on Earth.
    Though it was presented at a science conference and was the result of nine years of work, the findings haven’t yet been published in a scientific journal and haven’t been peer reviewed. Boston planned more genetic tests for the microbes she revived both in the lab and on site.
    The life forms – 40 different strains of microbes and even some viruses – are so weird that their nearest relatives are still 10 percent different genetically. That makes their closest relative still pretty far away, about as far away as humans are from mushrooms, Boston said.