.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Los Alamos High School student Miriam Wallstrom has been selected as one of two New Mexico students to represent the state in Washington, D.C. during the 56th annual United States Senate Youth Program in March.

    Wallstrom will join student Aaron Braddock of Carlsbad, who was also selected from among the state’s top student leaders to be part of the 104 national student delegation. The students will also each receive a $10,000 college scholarship for undergraduate study.

    Wallstrom and Braddock will join Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) and Sen. Martin Heinrich (D-NM) during the special week March 3-10.

    The USSYP was created by Senate Resolution 324 in 1962 and has been sponsored by the Senate and fully funded by The Hearst Foundations since inception.

    Originally proposed by Senators Kuchel, Mansfield, Dirksen and Humphrey, the impetus for the program as stated in Senate testimony is “to increase young Americans’ understanding of the interrelationships of the three branches of government, learn the caliber and responsibilities of federally elected and appointed officials, and emphasize the vital importance of democratic decision making not only for America but for people around the world.”

  • Today through April 4
    – Forest Explorers Hike and Play from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Get outside this winter by exploring with PEEC! This six-session class is for youth ages 5 to 8 and meets every other Wednesday. Admission: $135/non-member, $110/PEEC member. 

    THURSDAY

    Dr. Carmen Solano will be doing a Free Thyroid Seminar from 6-7 p.m. at the Los Alamos Project Y Conference room, from 6 Solano is a Medical Physician and a Functional Medicine Doctor. Space is limited so call 505-500-8356 to reserve a chair.

     

    Raspberry PI Club 7-8 p.m. at Los Alamos Makers, 3540 Orange St., Suite LV1. All levels are welcome. Get introduced to Raspberry Pis, get help with your Pi project and meet other Pi enthusiasts. Club facilitated by Akkana Peck, author of “Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi zero W; Controlling the world around you with a $10 computer.”

    FRIDAY

    High altitude baking presentation from 10-11 a.m. in the Fuller Lodge classroom, on the second floor. Free. Contact Desaree Jimenez from New Mexico State University at 662-2656 for information.

     

  • As 2017 came to a close, Chartwell’s Food Services, the organization that feeds the staff and students for Los Alamos Public Schools, had a visit from an “elf.” This elf came to Chartwells through the help of an employee with a goal of helping to feed children.
    Director of Dining Services and Chef Mia Holsapple was asked how people could help kids in need of some assistance with lunch. To the surprise of many, there is a lot of need in our community and the donation was able to provide assistance to all of our local schools.
    The donor saw the need of many, especially single parents trying to find their way. “Her words were that she has been in the place of many people who have needed a hand up in life not a hand out,” said Holsapple. “She was blessed to be able to do this for others this time of the year.”
    The donation was used to assist a variety of students and in a variety of ways. The donor helped students by paying down balances, paying off balances and in some cases adding funds to accounts. Now more meals would be at the ready when students return to school next week.

  • The 2017 nominees are in for the Community Asset Awards, which will take place January 13.
    Thirty-eight nominees that live or work in our community have been nominated for accolades from 2017. One will win the biggest honor of the night, the prestigious Spirit of the West Award, named in honor of former County Councilor Jim West.
    “We’re excited once again to acknowledge the efforts of those that make our community better in many ways every day,” said Bernadette Lauritzen, executive director of Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). The local non-profit welcomes nominations throughout the entire year with a special focus to get submissions between Thanksgiving and the winter holidays.
    The celebration has found a home in the Betty Ehart Senior Center for several years. That night nominees and a guest are invited for a variety of desserts to herald their accomplishments. A very limited number of tickets are sold to community members that would like to attend the occasion.
    Another annual celebration is that the nominees are unaware of who nominated them for the award and why until the actual celebration is held. Nominees are never made to speak to the large crowd gathered, but are made to stand with other nominees while their accolades are shared with the crowd.

  • The thought of removing a pet’s eye can be scary, but in some cases, eye removal is necessary to improve the pet’s quality of life. Dr. Lucien Vallone, a clinical assistant professor in the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how eye removal can be beneficial.
    “Veterinarians and veterinary ophthalmologists perform an eye removal when an eye has become both painful and blinded by a disease that is unresponsive to medical therapy,” Vallone said. “The most common cause of this in dogs and cats is from a disease called glaucoma, which creates high pressure in the eye. Eye removal is also performed when an aggressive or malignant tumor invades the eye or nearby structures.”
    Having just one or no eyes may seem unpleasant, but most pets that have had one or both eyes removed experience a dramatic increase in their quality of life.
    “Most animals are experiencing chronic pain prior to eye removal, so most will respond postoperatively by displaying more energy and playfulness,” Vallone said. “Every animal is different, but most dogs and cats who have had one eye removed are behaviorally indistinguishable from their two-eyed peers.”

  • Felipe Rodriguez says he thought he was hallucinating when an eagle snatched his sister’s little white dog from her yard, flapped its massive wings and disappeared over the trees.

    Did he really just see that?

    He had. Zoey the 8-pound bichon frise was gone, taken by a hungry raptor Tuesday afternoon not 50 feet from his sister’s house on the banks of the Lehigh River in Pennsylvania, Rodriguez said.

    “It seemed like something from the ‘Wizard of Oz,’” he told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “I’m a city boy. This doesn’t happen in my world.”

    Even more astonishing: Zoey would live to bark the tale.

    More on that later. But first, let it be said that eagles are quite capable of taking a small dog or a cat.

    “It has been documented before, but not that often,” said Laurie Goodrich, a biologist at nearby Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, a ridgetop preserve that annually records tens of thousands of migrating hawks, eagles and falcons.

    With food scarce and waterways freezing up, raptors are “looking a little more widely and taking advantage of whatever might be out there,” she said.

  • The Los Alamos County Animal Shelter employees just want to put this up front: Rando, an eight month old Manchester Terrier that’s up for adoption, loves to chew.

    Anything, including shoes and stuffed animals. Unfortunately, it was the reason he was given up.

    But, Rando is just a puppy, and according to employees at the animal shelter, he’s a fast learner. 

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter is hoping someone can train him out of his chewing habit with the right kind of attention.

    He just needs a forever home with some adults around to mind him.

    Rando loves children and other dogs. He has also been vaccinated and microchipped.

    Rando also walks well on a leash and is housetrained. Rando is all about playing, and is good at fetching – just make sure the toy isn’t a stuffed animal.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.

  • The public is invited to attend the fall prevention workshop “Stay on Your Feet:  Keeping your Balance and Preventing Falls,” a presentation at Aspen Ridge Lodge, located at 1010 Sombrillo Court.

    The presentation will be January 23, given by Robert Lee, PT, DPT, MA and director of LAMC Rehabilitation Services.

    No RSVP is needed to attend. Refreshments will be served on third floor of Aspen Ridge.

    For information, contact Cynthia Goldblatt, program manager and liaison, at 695-8981.

  • THURSDAY
    Nature on Tap: Recent Discoveries in Astronomy at 5:30 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local astronomers to discuss the latest findings in astronomy including gravitational waves and neutron star collisions. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    FRIDAY
    January Night Sky Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify constellations and planets visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty on our planetarium dome. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    LA Community Blood Drive from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at the First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive, by United Blood Services. Free.
    SATURDAY
    Bird Walk: Los Luceros Historic Site at 6:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy this rare and scenic birding opportunity with local expert Joe Fitzgibbon. Cost is $20 for members, $24 for non-members. A portion of your registration fee will be donated to Los Luceros.

    Feature Film: Incoming!
at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what impacts from above can teach us about the history of our planet, the Solar System, and the Universe! Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Start the New Year with a Cowboy Pancake Breakfast.  The first breakfast of the year will be from 7-11 a.m.  Sunday at the Posse Lodge on North Mesa Road.

    The all-you-can-eat breakfast features a variety of pancakes plus eggs, sausage, bacon, coffee and juice. Adult breakfasts will cost $7, children 10 and under can eat for $4.

    This month, the proceeds from breakfast will benefit the Rotary Club of Los Alamos.

    The Rotary Club, which has been serving the Los Alamos community for over 50 years, plans to use the funds for improvements to the Quemazon Trailhead.

    Other projects supported by the club and the community’s generosity include providing pre-paid exam vouchers for UNM-LA students in the high school equivalency program; the LAHS Memorial Garden; vocational training for Delancey Street residents; transportation to swimming lessons for fourth-graders in the elementary schools; an active inbound and outbound Youth Exchange Student Exchange program and leadership camp for high school students; the Deborah Beene Music Awards; the LAHS Memorial Garden; picnic tables for PEEC; funding support for the Posse Lodge, FIRST Robotics, the Hilltalkers Speech and Debate; LA Makers, Boy Scouts, LA Cares, Family Strengths Network, the Senior Center, and PAC-8 after-school programs for middle-schoolers.