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Today's Features

  • March 15 — A boy. Brayden Layne Aragon. Born to Jessica Martinez-Aragon and Ernest C. Aragon Jr.
    March 21 — A boy. Aiden Talavera. Born to Elicia and Obed Talavera.
    March 24 — A boy. Corban Endeavor Smith. Born to Leanne and David Smith.

  • April 2-8
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Fettuccine Chicken             Alfredo
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury Steak
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY    
    8:30 a.m.–1 p.m.    LAVA Quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.

    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.

    CATS
     
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.
    Lemon—A sweet older cat that was left at the front door of the shelter with no information or history. Lemon is currently in foster care receiving treatment for diabetes; her foster home reports that they call her Sugar, since she’s so sweet! When Lemon is feeling better, she’ll be looking for a mellow home that is understanding of the needs of a diabetic cat.

  • TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
from 10:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Cost for yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: “Phantom of the Universe” from 7-7:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore dark matter, from the Big Bang to its anticipated discovery at the Large Hadron Collider. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
     
    Gardening for Pollinators
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join Master Gardener Kate Whealen and learn to select plants that support pollinators. Registration required. Cost is $10 or $8 for members.
    MONDAY
    Sleep Matters/Sleep Apnea and Treatment presentation at 2 p.m. on the third floor at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court. Presenters are Dr. Roger Wiggins and Patricia Donahue, respiratory therapist of the SW Sleep Center. Refreshments served. No RSVP is necessary.  Los Alamos community, residents and families invited. Call Cynthia Goldblatt, community liaison at 695-8981 for information.

  • National Crime Victim’s Week is this week.
    Community collaboration efforts will take place for educational opportunities throughout the week and culminate in resource booths at both Smith’s locations from 1-5 p.m. Friday.
    Project partners will be on hand to answer questions and hand out free t-shirts while supplies last.
    To learn more, contact the Los Alamos Police Department Victim’s Assistant at 663-3511. No police report required.
    To learn more, visit VictimsofCrime.org.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club will host nationally renowned equestrian trainer and instructor Robert Taylor over the weekend of April 8-9.
    Community members are welcome to come and observe the event or participate in the mounted activities.
    Taylor, of TaylorMade Stables in Maryland (taylormadestables.com/robert-taylor.html), will be in town to coach show jumping and mounted games competitors of all levels. This has become an annual event for local riders, who greatly enjoy Taylor’s gruff humor and superb training skills.
    Taylor has been a fixture in the show jumping, competitive driving, foxhunting and mounted games communities internationally for many years, and his daughter Mackenzie won the International Mounted Games Association World individual Championship under-17 in 2012.
    Morning sessions for the Los Alamos clinic will be at the jump arena (behind the main rodeo facility), and focus on jumping skills for horse and rider, and then each afternoon the club will set up for mounted games practice.
    Mounted games participants can sign up to participate even on the same day of the clinic. Both English and Western tack is permitted, as long as everyone has helmets and boots.
    Audience members are welcome at no charge, but are asked to leave dogs at home or keep them leashed at all times for safety.

  • Easter is one of the most important days of the year for Christians. Easter Sunday is filled with symbolism and tradition, some of which harken back to early Christianity, while others trace their origins to paganism.
    The Easter Bunny and Easter eggs are two Easter traditions with less extensive histories. The Easter Bunny, according to sources including History.com, first arrived in America in the 1700s via German settlers who brought with them their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase.” Children would make nests where the rabbit could lay its colored eggs. Eventually, the custom spread from Pennsylvania, where many German immigrants settled, to other areas around the country.
    Eggs are symbolic of new life and rebirth in many cultures. To Christians, eggs represent the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
    Another theory suggests that Christians were once forbidden to eat during the Lenten season preceding Easter. Therefore, Christians would paint and decorate eggs for Easter to mark the joyous celebration and cessation of penance and fasting.
    Even though these traditions have endured, Easter eggs themselves might not be so strong. This year, Easter celebrants may want to experiment with different materials that are more forgiving and more enduring than standard eggs.
    Wooden eggs

  • Volunteers from the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will form a Circle of Love Saturday morning, as they prepare to leave for Puerto Penasco, Mexico, to build homes for the poor.
    The 50-plus-member team will build for three families this week, including a 78-year-old mother and her daughter that make $35 a week, a five-member family that makes $42 a week and a six-member family that makes $170 a week.
    As they do a formal key ceremony of Friday for each family, giving them the keys to their first real home, the team tells each family that the house is a gift and they owe them nothing for their work.
    The team will arrive back in Los Alamos Saturday night.

  • This week, I feel like the column should be called, “It’s all about me,” and “It’s not about me at all.”
    Today starts the long, slow crawl to 50, and the previous year and a half has been a stressful time, to say the least.
    It has been a time to see what you’re made of, grab the bull by the horns and hold on for the ride.
    I’ve always had friends with children a year or two older than our children.
    I highly recommend it, because these little nuggets of wisdom can be stored, like a squirrel stores nuts and pulled out when you really need them.
    So the same might be true of having a friend that is a few years older than you. Perhaps it will help you see what’s ahead and perhaps at the same time, you don’t want to know.
    I had a friend that had already hit the magic age of 50. She had some health problems, but was battling through along the way.
    Then unexpectedly, she died in her sleep. Yep, 50 years old and gone overnight.
    My heart aches for her husband, because he’s just slightly younger than my husband and his life has been uprooted in a flash.

  • The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities is bringing four speakers and a film to the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 4.
    The evening will start with a discussion about rivers and local water issues by four speakers followed by a break with refreshments and a chance to meet the speakers. Afterward, they will show the documentary This event is free.
    The four talks are:
    • Where the water we use in Los Alamos comes from, with some thoughts on a sustainable future by Jack Richardson, Deputy Utilities Manager – Gas, Water, Sewer (GWS) for Los Alamos County.
    • The End of the Dam-building Era in the Western US by Steve Harris, Executive Director of Rio Grande Restoration.
    • Rethinking the Rio: the opportunity and challenge of moving low-elevation storage from Elephant Butte to high-elevation reservoirs on the Rio Chama to conserve water from evaporation and restore flows to an ailing river by Jen Pelz, Wild Rivers Program Director at WildEarth Guardians