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Today's Features

  • El Rancho de las Golondrinas is where the west is truly wild this summer.
    From 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 1-2, members of the community can meet lawmen, desperados and mountain men who put the “wild” in “wild west!” Learn about life and how people survived on the dangerous frontier.
    There will be two special performances at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., of the New Mexico Territory Cowboy Mounted Shooters.
    From 11:45 a.m.-2:45 p.m., both days, instructors will be available to teach archery and atlatl. Reservations are required and sign up for a shoot as soon as possible to get a spot because spaces fill up quickly and are on a first come, first served basis.
    Saturday only, The Honorable Bruce Black will present a lecture on “Elfego Baca: Lawman of New Mexico” in the Paloheimo Education Center.
    From 1-1:45 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in the Golondrinas Chapel, Edward Wallace will speak about “Estevan the Moor,” the 1539 Fray Marcos de Niza expedition.
    In addition, there will be Musical Performers of the Frontier Past, Mark Gardner and Rex Rideout, frontier music by Yesso Stockman, and music from the ranch and open range by Steve Cormier. Plus, roving fiddle music by New Mexico’s own, Michael Jasper.

  • Ever want to learn more about what’s growing at the Los Alamos Nature Center? Becky Oertel, head of the Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s landscape committee and veteran gardener Natali Steinberg will explain. The public is welcome to see what’s growing, why each plant was chosen, and what kind of care they need to thrive. The tour will be 7 p.m. Aug. 4 at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road. It is free to attend, and no registration is required. 

  • With his wealth of compositions, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is one of the most favored composers in Western music, and well-liked at The Santa Fe Opera. This year they are presenting an earlier work of Mozart’s, “La Finta Giardiniera.” This opera, with its unrealistic plot, is enjoyable, no matter how nonsensical the action on the stage seems. Mozart’s music is so agreeable that it renders weaknesses in the storyline irrelevant.
    The orchestra is, as usual, fantastic, as is the conductor, Harry Bicket. Bicket is also very pleasing to watch. It sounds as though this bouncy, energetic score derives some panache from the man with the baton.
    The set is exactly what one would expect for a Mozart piece — however, this doesn’t mean it’s boring. Audience members can settle in their seats and view the extraordinary Santa Fe sunset happening in the background, making each performance unique. The costumes, as well, are fairly typical, but again, not in the least boring. The Podestà looks magnificent, as does his niece, Arminda.
    Even the plain black clothing in which the servants are dressed is beautifully tailored, and the colors and fabrics provide a wonderful visual balance with the stage.

  • Today
    Downtown Dogs is a weekly walking group. All dogs and their humans are invited to walk from Pet Pangaea, 158 Central Park Square for a stroll around Downtown Los Alamos. 7 p.m. Come prepared with a standard leash, no longer than 6 feet.

    Swing dancing. 7 p.m. at Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road. $3-$5. For more information, email AtomicCitySwing@gmail.com.

    (This) Ability: Trisha Ebbert. Through Saturday at the Portal Gallery.
    Friday
    Gentle Hikes with PEEC. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. 8:30 a.m. Free. Adults. Meet at the Nature Center and carpool to the trailhead. For more information, losalamosnature.org.

    Quiet, Gentle Walks. Join Sue Watts for a gentle walk along a relatively flat trail. The walks range from 1-2 miles and may include gentle changes in elevation.  Each walk includes 20 minutes of silent walking. Free. Meets every Friday at 8:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Check peecnature.org for any changes.

  • “Best Summer Camp Ever!!! Wish it lasted longer,” wrote one young participant on a survey after the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Summer Program for Youth wrapped up in mid-July.
    Offering five days of afternoon classes on chemistry in the kitchen, robotics and university explorations, the Youth College program, geared toward kids entering grades 4-6, boasted 51 participants. “I learned a lot that I hadn’t known before...This camp was awesome!” shared another participant.
    For students entering grades 1-3, Children’s College presented Adventures at the University, an exploration of various STEM topics and included astronomy, chemistry, nutrition and art activities indoors and outdoors.
    “It encouraged me to be a chemist when I grow up,” wrote one of the 18 kids in the program.
    Parents were pleased with the kids’ progress in the course, as well, and one wrote, “The camp was a good way to get the children’s minds going during summer ... my child had so much to say after every class about what he learned for the day.”
    Other classes that the kids participated in were game design, cartooning and digital movie making, and some exciting new offerings this year include biotechnology and engineering.

  • Earlier this month, the Mesa Public Library hosted the annual Stuffed Animal Sleepover. Children dropped their plush at the library overnight and picked them up in the morning. The “animals” had a fun-filled night with the library staff.
    In the morning the children returned to pick up their animals. Youth Services Director Angie Manfredi read a storybook with the kids and treated them to juice and donuts, followed by a slideshow of the stuffed animals adventures at the library, which had the children rolling with laughter.
    One of the organizers Melissa Mackey said the library staff and student volunteers worked hard to put together the event. Special thanks to staff members Chelsea Wilson and Elly Olivas and students Dillon Barnes and Jared Tapia.
    A digital photo frame of the slideshow is featured on the library’s Facebook page.
    The purpose of the event was to show youth that there is all kinds of fun to be had to the local library.

  • Sage Cottage Montessori invites the community to an open house from 3-5 p.m. Saturday.
    Director Sandra Sorensen took over when the former owner Cheri Host passed away from ovarian cancer.
    Sorensen began as a classroom educator and sees the love her staff has for watching those in their charge grow.
     “They are wonderful, loving caring teachers who are always looking out for the best interest of the children and being sure to treat them as individuals,” Sorensen said. “Our core staff has worked at Sage Cottage for over six years.”
    Sage is a 4-star school that works hard to maintain its rating through a variety of educational opportunities for their students. The school caters to families with children ranging in age from 6 weeks to 5 years old.
    Sage Cottage offers a great teacher to student ratio, which includes a librarian, music teacher and special monthly science activities in addition to their daily science lessons.
    “We use zoo-phonics at Sage Cottage, to teach language, Montessori and science-based play,” Sorensen said. “We also have Las Cumbres services for a variety of services and an inclusion specialist at our disposal.”
    Sorensen is a married mother of two grown children and one grandchild.

  • Today
    Green Hour Hikes with PEEC. Meet at local trailheads for meandering hikes where kids set the pace and decide the activities. Some days you’ll hike far, others you’ll stop and play at an interesting spot. 9:30 a.m. Free. All ages. Check PEEC’s website for trailhead meeting points. For more information, losalamosnature.org.

    The local chapter of TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meets every Wednesday at the White Rock Presbyterian Church, 310 Rover Blvd. Confidential weight in begins at 9 a.m. The meeting starts at 9:45 a.m. The first visit is free. Membership is open to people at least 7 years old. For more information, contact whiterocktops@gmail.com.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    Summer Family Evenings: Treasure! Sponsored by Del Norte Credit Union. Follow treasure maps and learn to geocache! The Family YMCA’s Youth Earth Service Corps lead this fun wrap-up to Summer Family Evenings. $5 per family/free for member families. 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. All ages. More information at losalamosnature.org.

    (This) Ability: Trisha Ebbert. Through Aug. 1 at the Portal Gallery.
    Thursday
    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

  • After more than a 20 year run, Bear Camp is saying farewell following the 2015 season. The reason is the program has experienced declining numbers for the last five years, according to Dianne Marquez, recreation programs manager with the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Division.
    “It’s been a great run of over 20 years of Bear Camp at the Los Alamos County Ice Rink, but 2015 is the last summer this wonderful program will be offered by the county,” a recent press release stated, which Marquez said disappointed some parents and kids, but for the most part the closing was understood. “When we started this program back in the 1990s, we were the only game in town,” Marquez said. With the addition of many other camps in the region over the years, the county reviewed the program and decided it was no longer cost effective to continue.
    It began with a purpose to fill a gap in summer childcare services, but now many other camps have come to Los Alamos and there are several more summer camp activities to choose from.
    Marquez has been there from the beginning along with her predecessor Annie Pyburn, whom she worked with for many years.

  • Today
    Las Conchas Fire: Sketches in Charcoal and Fire. Join artist Rumi Vesselinova as she presents photographs of the Las Conchas fire as she viewed it from Santa Fe during the fire, and images of the fire-altered landscape as it appeared after the fire. 7 p.m. Free. losalamosnature.org.

    Tuesdays at the Pond. 7 p.m. Los Alamos Light Opera. Event is every Tuesday through Aug. 11 at Ashley Pond. Free.

    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org.

    Art, Wind, and Fire. Artist Rumi Vesselinova shares her photographs of wildlfire and scientist Terry Foxx talks about how the landscape recovers. Free. 7 p.m.

    (This) Ability: Trisha Ebbert. Through Aug. 1 at the Portal Gallery.
    Wednesday