.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • May 5: A girl, Adah Mae Leyba-Moya, born to Shayleen Lujan and Justin Leyba-Moya
    May 14: A boy, Jerome Baca, born to Alicia and Emilio Baca
    May 15: A girl, Naveah Faith Martinez, born to Samantha Bachicha and Brandon Martinez
    May 16: A girl, Alicia Narae Gallegos, born to Maria A. and Wilfred L. Gallegos
    May 18: A boy, Vincent Wilbur Naranjo, born to Kara Baca and Nolan Naranjo
    May 19: A boy, Aaden Michael Griego, born to Stephanie and Daniel Griego
    May 27: A boy, Wyatt Eugene Lambson, born to Jenny and Britton Lambson
     

  • May 31-June 6, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    10 a.m.        Senior civic discussion group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken enchilada
    Noon        Grief  support
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Computer users group
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Lemon cod
    1:30 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA quilters

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Annie — A 9-year-old, spayed, female who needs a peaceful indoor home. She came into the shelter several years ago as one of a kitten litter being cared for by a big gentle cat. That “mama” cat turned out to be a gentleman. Both he and Annie became part of a household. Because of medical care now needed by their owner, Annie had to come back to the shelter, now as a grown-up girl.

  • Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 9 a.m. with coffee and doughnuts served during fellowship hour starting at 10:15 a.m. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. and worship at 10:30.  This week we continue our chapter by chapter, verse by verse study in the book of 1 Samuel.
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • “Evangelism’ seems to be a word that brings up bad vibes with a lot of people, even Christians. Does the Bible say much about this topic?”— Stephen

    The New Testament says a great deal about it. The term is a transliteration of the Greek word that means “good news.”
    Evangelism was important to Jesus. He told His followers that they should be about telling the good news of His coming and of the salvation available in Him (Mt. 28:19-20; Ac. 1:8).
    He deliberately sent out His disciples to proclaim the good news (Mk. 6:7ff; Lk. 10:1ff). He declared that more people would be needed for this task (Mt. (:37; Lk. 10:2).
    Evangelism is a natural response for individuals who have experienced a personal encounter with Christ.
    In practice, evangelism is less a program and more a matter of conversation along the way. Jesus talked to all kinds of people, wherever He was, in whatever circumstance He found Himself.
    Even if He was on His way to somewhere else, even if he was tired, hungry, and close to cranky (Mk. 6:30-34), He turned His attention to the person in front of Him.

  • Today
    Blood Drive in Los Alamos community. Until 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive. For more information, call United Blood Services at 1-877-827-4376. Bring photo ID and donor card. Free cholesterol testing with every donation. Volunteers provided by LAVA.  

    Authors Speak Series. Anne Hillerman. 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library upstairs rotunda.

    Eye Spy: Rebecca Nolda. Through June 27 at Portal Gallery. Bring the Secret City some new hidden treasure to discover.
    Friday
    Blood Drive in Los Alamos community. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. at First Baptist Church Hall, 2200 Diamond Drive. For more information, call United Blood Services at 1-877-827-4376. Bring photo ID and donor card. Free cholesterol testing with every donation. Volunteers provided by LAVA.   

    Gordon’s Summer Concert Series. The Band of Heathens. 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond. Free. For more information, visit GordonsSummerConcerts.com.
    Saturday

  • The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Nature Playtimes are one of its most popular programs.
    Offered free to families every Monday morning, the Playtimes combine fun, developmentally appropriate stories, songs, crafts and activities with time outside enjoying nature.
    Albuquerque’s Albert I. Pierce Foundation recognizes the worth of this program and the value it brings to families, and has given PEEC $5,000 to support it.
    During a recent Nature Playtime, families explored an ant theme. They heard a story comparing the families of ants to families of children.
    Children created egg-carton ants with clothespin jaws, and hunted outside for “food” to grasp in the jaws and take back to the anthill. They examined the harvester ant display in the nature center and observed how busy the ants were digging tunnels, finding food and keeping their home clean.
    They discovered how ants leave trails for one another, and then they followed a trail to an anthill fort, where children role-played ants. As ants, they took care of their eggs, foraged for food, worked together to carry large objects and escaped predators.

  • The Los Alamos High School Class of 2015 is set to walk the stage on Saturday and while the students may be thinking ahead about their futures, they are also thinking of the students they leave behind, not just at LAHS, but throughout the district.
    Each year a graduating class bequeaths a gift to the school that is purchased through funds raised throughout their time at LAHS.
    This year, the class of 2015 has elected to benefit the future ’Toppers by offering resources that will help all seven of the Los Alamos Public School sites through education.
    “The kindness and compassion of the senior class of 2015, is really quite remarkable,” said LAHS Principal Dr. Debbie Belew-Nyquist. “The idea that their gift can benefit the students of the entire district demonstrates their well roundedness.”
    Display cases have been purchased for the five elementary schools and Los Alamos Middle School that will house resources on a wide ranging area of topics including nutrition, exercise, bullying, how to make friends and ways to handle stress.

  • Gov. Susana Martinez is apparently OK with tripling the state’s medical marijuana harvest, but adamantly opposed to growing hemp.
    Why?
    The variety of cannabis commonly known as “industrial hemp” is cousin to marijuana, but without the psychoactive components. You could burn a bushel in your bong without inducing anything more than a dull headache.
    Although lacking medicinal value or recreational appeal, hemp is an enormously useful plant. The seeds are a high-protein food source, and the oil can be used in cooking as well as in paint, wax and numerous other applications. The fiber from the stalks is similar to linen and is used in clothing, insulation, carpeting, paper and rope.
    Hemp could be “a hugely beneficial cash crop” for New Mexico farmers, according to Stuart Rose, founder of the Bioscience Center, a business incubator in Albuquerque.
    It requires much less water than cotton and literally grows like a weed, without expensive pesticides and fertilizer.
    “You can grow twice the value of alfalfa for half the water,” Rose said.