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Today's Features

  • Right about now, some residents are getting their floats ready for the annual Los Alamos Holiday Lights Parade. They are also making luminarias, and Santa is transforming the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge into his workshop.
    It’s that time of year again when WinterFest comes to Los Alamos. The festivities will begin this Friday with the Los Alamos LDS Church’s annual Creche Show. Nativity scenes featuring the Christ child, will be on display at the church starting Friday night. The event, which has been a crowd favorite for over 20 years, promises to delight attendees again this year. Nativity scenes from many different cultures across the world will be displayed. Those wishing to lend their creches for display are encouraged to visit the church early Friday morning. They can pick them up after the show ends on Saturday at 4 p.m. The event goes from 2 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Friday, and from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. It will be at the Los Alamos LDS Church, 1967 18th Street.

  • Join the holiday fun with the BESC Hillstrummers ukulele group playing several December Holiday Singalongs.
    The first was enjoyed by diners attending the two Thanksgiving luncheons at the BESC on Nov. 18.
    The following singalongs are scheduled:  
    • 10 a.m. Friday in the day room at Sombrillo Nursing Home.
    • 10:45 a.m. Saturday in the Pajarito room at Fuller Lodge during the WinterFest Open House.
    • 11 a.m. Dec. 9 in the produce lobby at Smith’s Marketplace.
    • 10 a.m. Dec. 15 at the indoor Farmer’s Market at Fuller Lodge.
    The group’s talented director Kathleen Galbraith has driven over 3,600 miles from the Chama area this year to conduct spring and fall classes for over 45 students.
    Between class sessions, the group practices informally year round at the BESC for fun.
    Come and sing some of your favorite Holiday tunes accompanied by this fantastic little instrument.

  • In what has become a popular seasonal tradition in Los Alamos, the musicians of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra will again present the annual Holiday Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.
    Under the baton of conductor Tjett Gerdom, the full symphony will play popular versions of well known seasonal tunes.  
    The concert will also include excerpts from Bizet’s L’Arlesienne Suite No. 2 and from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite.
    An appealing feature of this special concert is the free raffle drawing, open to anyone in the audience – young or old.
    The winner will stand on the podium, take the baton from maestro Gerdom and lead the orchestra in “Jingle Bells”
    A sing-along is also included in this concert.
    Doors for the concert open at 6:30 p.m.  
    The concert is a gift from the orchestra to the community.  
    There is no charge although donations will be gratefully appreciated.

  • Art exhibits
    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May 2017.

    Zane Bennett Contemporary Art announces form & concept, a nonprofit arts organization founded to push and explore the boundaries of perceived distinctions between art, craft and design. The programming acts as a conversation between these disciplines, supporting contemporary creative practice through exhibitions of regional and international artists. Form & concept serves the community through its educational programming by producing artist residencies, workshops, lectures and other events.

    “Visual Poetry: Bill Barrett Sculpture” at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden at Museum Hill. The exhibit will showcase 16 sculptures by the nationally and internationally recognized sculptor Bill Barrett, who is based in Santa Fe and New York City. The show will be on view within the Botanical Garden, 715 Camino Lejo, and is included in the general admission cost. The show will run through May 14, 2017.

  • The annual Breakfast with Santa, sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Los Alamos, with a large contribution from Del Norte Credit Union, will be held this Saturday from 7-11 a.m. at the Betty Ehart Senior Center.
    The breakfast is free. In return, attendees are requested to donate either non-perishable food items or money.
    Food collected will be used by LA Cares to feed local families in need. Money donated will be used for the Kiwanis/CYFD Foster Children Christmas party. Any money left over from the Foster Children’s party will be used to make up food baskets, which will also be distributed to those in need.
    Come out and see Santa and enjoy a good breakfast and a morning of good cheer in the true Christmas spirit.
     

  • THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 5:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members.
    FRIDAY
    Join the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra at 7 p.m. for a Holiday Pops Concert at Crossroads Bible Church.

    Feature Film and Talk: “Exploding Universe” at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Voyage through space and discover explosive events that shaped the Universe and hear from astrophysicist Dr. Rick Wallace. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

    Los Alamos Garden Club annual fresh Christmas Wreath Sale, from 9 a.m. until they are sold out, in the lobby of the Los Alamos National Bank. The wreaths are made of fresh green cut in the Jamez Mountains. The proceeds from the sale support a scholarship fund. The club awards a scholarship to a local  graduating senior each year. For more information, contact Sally Warner at 662-9473.

    Ribbon Cutting for Bradbury Association Kiosk at 11:30 a.m. The non-profit Bradbury Science Museum Association, which will operate a kiosk inside the Bradbury Science Museum selling tourist friendly items, is having its ribbon cutting inside the museum.

  • As we have just spent some glorious time celebrating Thanksgiving, I hope that is just the start of your thankfulness.
    As we approach a new calendar year, more than in year’s past, we need to celebrate the little and big things that make life great.
    We need to talk about the good and not let the bad creep into daily life. There are many obstacles as we navigate each day, but we must set the tone for positivity.
    We need to highlight something each day that should be elevated into conversation. It is easy to let someone bring you down, but flip the story and bring someone up instead of down.
    If you can’t think of one, find a few simple phrases that may put someone on the spot to come up with a good story.
    Tell me about your favorite book? Tell me something fun about your grandson? What did you do over the holiday break? What are you looking forward to for the next holiday break?
    Have you thought of any good presents to give or receive this year? What’s the best handmade gift you ever received? What is a good movie you have rented lately? What’s a good idea for dinner tonight?
    It is easy if you think about it, you take something you really want to know, put a positive question around it and there you go.

  • A Los Alamos punk rock musician hopes to shake up the classical music world with three compositions he has produced into YouTube videos.
    K.L. Fortson hopes his creations will make people think differently about orchestral music.
    The videos of “Untitled for Guitar and String Quartet,” “Arecibo Calling Kafka” and “Whales Floating Belly Up” can be found at klfortson.com.
    Classical music is a bit of a departure for Fortson, who has toured extensively for punk rock bands before embarking on the project.
    “I wanted to do more complex music, and I also wanted to more non-lyrical music,” he said. “I was also drawn to the fact that it doesn’t have any concrete meeting.”
    Fortson is a 2006 graduate of the University of New Mexico. He majored in criminology and has always been interested in the arts, especially music and painting.
    “I took a class called ‘Deviance’ based on the name. It sounded really fascinating. I just liked how psychology, sociology and business were really studying the same facets of humanity but through a different lens,” he said. “I’ve always liked propaganda and media, and that’s what drew me to those.” Those interested can find more of his art on the website.

  • The time has come to look to the future and the holiday season. Head on over to kick start the joy of the holidays at the annual Festival of Trees at the Betty Ehart Senior Center from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday.
    The trees are up and on display now through Thursday during normal business hours with a grand finale Saturday for final bidding.
    More than 70 items, including trees, wreaths, ornaments and decorations on display and available through silent auction and bidders need not be present to win. The Saturday showcase will feature a craft fair, free pictures with Santa and musical talents of local artists.
    While admission is free, donations of lunch and snack items or pre-packaged cookies are a suggested donation to benefit local school children.
    The funds raise money for two local non-profits, the Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization (LARSO) and Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA).
    “There is a bear tree with a sign that says ‘Don’t feed the bears – they are already stuffed,” says LARSO Executive Director Pauline Powell Schneider. “There are trees with birds, snowmen, angels, Sweet Christmas, it’s a Gingerbread World, wreaths that are rustic, some that sparkle, others with berries or holly, and centerpieces with snowmen and candy canes.”

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center will host artist Lisa Coddington, who will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects. The class will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Los Alamos Nature Center.
    Coddington’s class is open to all, from beginners to advanced artists.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy to understand demonstrations and Master artist examples, Lisa will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students is required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by Thursday. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist/instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in Illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction.