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Today's Features

  • Los Alamos County Library System announced winners Thursday for the Design a Bookmark competition for students that was revived in May.
    “We were so excited to bring this program back after a few year hiatus,” said Angie Manfredi, Head of Youth Services. “It’s a fun activity for the kids and the library gets some cool new bookmarks to hand out!”
    The library received hundreds of entries thanks to the participation of local schools. Library staff judged each anonymous entry and the votes were tabulated to establish winners by grade.
    In some cases, the results ended in ties. The entries were based around the library’s summer programming theme of “Build a Better World.”
    All winners and those who earned honorable mentions received gift certificates to the Friends of the Library bookstore and their designs were turned into bookmarks that are now available to the public at both the Mesa Public Library and the White Rock Branch Library.
    “We’re excited to have the bookmarks ready now that school is back in session,” Manfredi said. “We think it’s a great way to kick off this school year and we’re grateful that the program was so successful due to the cooperation and participation of the schools.”

  • Calling all volunteers! Pajarito Environmental Education Center and Los Alamos County Open Space and Trails need help to remove the last bits of fence from Acid Canyon and restore this great, little canyon to a more natural state on Oct. 28.
    The goal is to clean up the old chain-link fence that mars the steep slope below the nature center in Acid Canyon.
    The group is looking for people who can hike the short distance down into the canyon, then bring pieces of fencing back up to the rim to be disposed of. Other teams will work to load larger pieces of trash into a county truck to be hauled out of the canyon.
    The group also needs help moving piles of invasive, non-native elm cuttings and collecting litter that has been washed into the smaller side canyons, so there will be lots of jobs for all willing helpers.
    This is a community project that will help beautify a popular area that many people see when hiking near the nature center.
    Registration is not required, but it is encouraged so that we bring enough supplies and snacks. To register and for more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit www.peecnature.org, email adventure@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.
     

  • The Karen Wray Gallery is delighted to invite you to “Phillip Noll, The Four Corners: A Photographic Exhibition,” October 20 through November 19, 2017, with an Opening Reception Friday, October 20 from 5-7pm.

    What does “The Four Corners” mean to you? Is it the common point of four intersecting territories? Summer, Fall, Winter, and Spring? North, East, South, and West? Earth, Water, Air, and Fire? Morning, Evening, Day, and Night? Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah?

    For award-winning photographer Phillip Noll, it means all these things. For the past two decades Phillip has been building a portfolio of images representing “The Four Corners.” Predominantly from the Colorado Plateau, these images will take you on a visual journey from deserts to forests, from mountains to canyons, from red rocks to waterfalls, and from the grand landscape to tiny details. “The photographs in this exhibition represent the amazing beauty of this region of the United States. The Four Corners area is absolutely filled with breathtaking scenery. All you have to do is look for it,” says Phillip.

  • Compañía Mina Fajardo and Chuscales will return to Teatro Paraguas this November.

    They have given sold-out performances the past six years. Audiences still remember their shows: Flamenco x3 (2015); Una Nota de Lorca (2016); and Choreography and Calligraphy (2017).

    The show set for three performances, Nov. 3, 4 and 5, is based on a bedtime story from the Brunn family, remembering events from 400 years ago in what is now Santa Fe, New Mexico and how its ancient inhabitants were confronted with New Spain.

    With utmost respect Teatro Paraguas presents: legendary flamenco singer Roberto Zamora; renowned flamenco guitarist/composer Chuscales; and choreographer/dancer Mina Fajardo.

    As with all treasure hunts, the true purpose is to reveal the magic of the human spirit and its will to survive, discovering the wealth of faith, family & community.

    The performances are at 7 p.m. Nov. 3, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Nov. 4 and 2 p.m. Nov. 5. All three performances will be at Teatro Paraguas in Santa Fe.

    Tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com.

  • The Santa Fe Symphony will present two programs featuring virtuoso violinist Alexi Kenney this year, the first which is Sunday with the full Symphony Orchestra, follow by concert recital one week later.

    Both performances are at 7 p.m. at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in Santa Fe.

    On Oct. 22, Kenney will be joined by prize-winning pianist, Renana Gutman, praised by The New York Sun for playing “with great vigor and aplomb.”

    Kenney, recipient of a prestigious 2016 Avery Fisher Career Grant, will be performing recital selections that range from the long-beloved E Major Partita by Bach – a technical showstopper for solo violin – to rarer works like Crumb’s Four Nocturnes, a delicate and birdlike meditation, featuring the subtle integration of many of Crumb’s inspired extended techniques, like having the soloist tap the violin as a percussive element.

    Tickets are $22-$80. Half-price tickets available for children ages 6-14 with adult purchase and no children under 6 will be admitted. Call 983-1414 or 1-800-480-1319 for tickets through the symphony box office, or dial the Lensic box office at 988-1234.

  • Travel back to the sights and sounds of immortal musical groups, brought to life in laser light. Laser and planetarium projectors will fill the dome the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Oct. 21-Nov. 3 with choreographed light, allowing the music and images to envelope the audience.

    Laser concerts light up. More than a million laser-generated hues and colors poetically express each timeless track.
    “We are only able to bring laser concerts to the planetarium once a year, and this time we’re especially excited to have the shows during Halloween and be able to present laser images with a live band,” said Jim Greenhouse, the Museum’s Space Science Director.

    For a few select evenings only, songs from the Beatles, U2, Led Zeppelin, and Metallica will be featured in dedicated shows along with compilation productions with tracks from classic rock, pop, and alternative bands.

    Two albums of Pink Floyd will be presented in recorded shows, but on one very special night, Dark Side of the Moon will be performed live with the laser by the band Pink Freud, presented in partnership with AMP Concerts as part of the New Mexico Culture Squared initiative.

  • Local geologist Patrick Rowe will lead an outing Oct. 14 to the Cabezon Peak area in search of geological treasures at two sites.

    Participants can expect to find minerals and marine fossils at the windmill site, and Shark’s Tooth Ridge is aptly named for the fossilized teeth from five species of Cretaceous Period sharks that the group will find.

    This program is organized by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. Space is limited.

    The windmill site lies roughly between Cabezon peak and the Ojito Wilderness, where the group will be collecting nodules containing calcite crystals and fossil gastropods and ammonites.

    The nodules in this area often contain open pockets with beautiful calcite and every now and then barite crystals. The calcite crystals are found within some very large, partially buried and highly weathered concretions.

    To collect them, participants should be ready to do some digging in loose sand to expose the concretions. Once exposed, use prying tools and hammers to take apart the concretions while keeping an eye out for calcite.

  • SANTA FE — Would-be archaeologists can be part of a mock excavation at the Oct. 14 New Mexico Archaeology Fair held this year in Taos at the Millicent Rogers Museum.

    Presented by the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division, Department of Cultural Affairs, the fair is a chance for children and adults to experience activities associated with cultures that trace their origins back thousands of years. At the same time, they can learn techniques developed over the last 150 years that have helped people better understand the lives of some of New Mexico’s earliest inhabitants.

    “The mock dig is new to the fair this year,” said State Archaeologist Michelle Ensey, who also is the deputy State Historic Preservation Officer at HPD. “We’re conducting the excavations using some of the same tools archaeologists use to excavate prehistoric and historic sites.”

    The fair runs from 10 a.m.–4 p.m. and admission is free. The museum is hosting the event and will be open during the fair, which also features the Taos Archaeological Society, state Office of Archaeological Studies, Archaeological Society of New Mexico and the New Mexico Archaeological Council. Several HPD archaeologists and cultural resource professionals will be on hand.

  • The Los Alamos debut of concert pianist Natasha Stojanovska will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the Sanctuary of the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St.

    The performance is free to the public.

    Stojanovska, a Macedonian native, is a true world-class artist and has just moved to Los Alamos.

    She has performed solo and chamber music recitals in France, Portugal, Macedonia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania, South Korea, Haiti, and the United States.

    Her performances have been broadcast on radio and television.

    Those who love piano repertoire will not want to miss her solo performance.

    On the program are pieces from Bach, Schubert, Chopin, Rachmaninoff, and one of Stojanovska’s.

  • Jemez Village is gearing up for its annual Jemez Mountain Trail Sale, which will happen at the same time people start coming from all over to see the fall foliage on the 132-mile Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway.

    This year, the sale will take place from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 21-22.

    The village tries to hold the sale when the leaves are turning and the fall colors are at their peak. 

    The massive yard sale is more than 26 miles long. It starts at San Ysidro and continues past La Cueva.

    The Jemez Mountain Scenic Byway is more than 163 miles long and starts in Bernalillo and ends at Bandelier National Monument. 

    The Jemez Mountain Trail Sale is an annual event where food vendors, artists, craftsmen and yard sale sellers can set their wares out on the side of NM 4 for shoppers and sightseers.

    Items for sale range from handcrafted items, jewelry and artwork to used cars, furniture, books, appliances and knick-knacks. Pottery, art and handcrafted items from Jemez Pueblo along with fundraiser tables set up by churches, schools, and other organizations may also be available.

    In addition to the sales and bargains along the way, the view will be great everywhere one looks.