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Today's Features

  • Art exhibits
    The 11th Annual Gala Exhibition and Auction on display through Friday will showcase artists from across the U.S. and abroad who find inspiration in Fechin’s legacy, Taos and the creative traditions of the Southwest.

    Zane Bennett Gallery announces “IMPACTS! II” an exhibition featuring Bi Rongrong, Shen Fan, Liang Shaoji and others, with seven artists in total. The show is at 435 South Guadalupe St., across from the rail station in Santa Fe, and coincides with the Last Friday Art Walk in the Railyard Arts District. There will be events occurring during these openings involving traditional and contemporary Chinese culture, with more information to follow.

    “Where the Buffalo Roam.” Angel Wynn, American artist and photographer. Show runs through Aug. 31 at Angel Wynn Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Kathleen Doyle Cook, “Intensity in Abstraction.” Through Aug. 31 at the New Concept Gallery in Santa Fe.

    Michael Lange – Wald/Fluss. Friday through Oct. 17. Opening, artist reception, and book signing from 5-7 p.m. Friday at the photo-eye Gallery, 541 S. Guadalupe St. in Santa Fe.

    Solo Artist Show with Michael Andryc. “Sophisticated Primitive Art.” Through Aug. 31 at the Red Boot Gallery at Range Café in Bernalillo.

  • One of Los Alamos’ greatest living treasures has a long story to tell about World War II.
    Bill Hudson turned 90 years old in May and continues to fill the community with knowledge of a past long gone but never forgotten.
    The recently released book, “Fighting the Unbeatable Foe,” by Karen Tallentire, chronicles Hudson’s time on the island of Iwo Jima in graphic detail.
    Hudson, born William Alfred Hudson, was raised in Manhattan and comes from a long line of military men, stemming back to his great-grandfather, Robert Jefferson Hudson, who fought in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.
    His father William Alonzo Hudson fought during World War I for the Navy. His brother served in the Army from 1947-1948. His sons also served in the military. His son, William James Hudson, was in the Navy from 1969-1973 and Ty Manon Hudson was a Marine from 1981-1987.
    Hudson himself joined the Marines in 1943 when he reached age 18. He said it was better that he volunteered to join the Corps than be drafted into the Army.
    Before enlisting, he was clean living and athletic and hung around people of the same likes. He was a non-smoker and non-drinker.

  • One of the most popular bands in Los Alamos County, the Red Elvises, entertained the crowd at the Relay for Life event Friday night at Ashley Pond.

  • This time of year always excites me for what lies ahead.
    As you read this, Los Alamos County Council will have proclaimed the month of September as Assets In Action month, which kicks off a yearlong journey of asset building.
    Asset building for our youth is so very important and it is something that needs to begin at a young age and continue throughout high school. We as a community need to engage our youth and help grow into great adults.
    So when groups talk about what we are doing for youth and are we running enough programs, I say unless they contain the relationship building work of Assets throughout the program, the gains are small in comparison.
    Now back to Assets month! On Sept. 4, the community is asked to wear their favorite college or university shirt, or one that supports their branch of service.
    Our love of lifelong learning happens in many ways and in many places.
    Snap a photo of yourself, your co-workers, etc., and email it to Assets@att.net.
    Our annual Change for Change collection to benefit the Community Asset Awards will be at Morning Glory Bakery, Finishing Touch, Aspen Copies, Chamber of Commerce, Children’s Clinic, the Los Alamos Co-op Market and the Animal Clinic of Los Alamos.

  • Today

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    Thursday

    Los Alamos Farmers Market. 7 a.m.-12:30 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library parking lot.

    United Blood Services Blood Drive. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at at the First Baptist Church Hall 2200 Diamond Dr. For more details contact United Blood Services at 1-877-UBS-HERO. Donors can enjoy an egg salad, ham, or turkey sandwich.

    Downtown Dogs is a weekly walking group. All dogs and their humans are invited to walk from Pet Pangaea, 158 Central Park Square for a stroll around Downtown Los Alamos. 7 p.m. Come prepared with a standard leash, no longer than 6 feet.

    Authors Speak Series. David Stuart. 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library upstairs rotunda.

    Friday

    Quiet, Gentle Walks. Join Sue Watts for a gentle walk along a relatively flat trail. The walks range from 1-2 miles and may include gentle changes in elevation. Each walk includes 20 minutes of silent walking. Free. Meets every Friday at 8:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Check peecnature.org for any changes.

    United Blood Services Blood Drive. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. at at the First Baptist Church Hall 2200 Diamond Drive. For more details contact United Blood Services at 1-877-UBS-HERO. Donors can enjoy an egg salad, ham, or turkey sandwich.

  • Irene Powell has been a volunteer at many places around Los Alamos, predominately as the director of the Los Alamos Volunteer Association (LAVA), which she retired from earlier this month.
    Although she said she loves volunteering, “it was time to retire.”
    She now wants to devote her time to traveling. Powell and her family recently returned from a trip to the Grand Canyon, which occurred immediately after her last day as LAVA’s director.
    She is not, however, giving up volunteering entirely. She remains active at United Church and the Red Cross.
    The Betty Ehart Senior Center held a Hawaiian-themed going away party for Powell on Aug. 6.
    “I have always felt strongly about volunteer work. She had worked as the volunteer director for Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization the past nine years, which she said was a wonderful job.
    “Helping seniors find volunteer opportunities with nonprofits was a very rewarding occupation,” she said. “I also enjoyed working with the staff there at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. They are very dedicated to the seniors in this community.”

  • It is not uncommon for pets to be considered a part of the family, which is why they deserve to live the happiest and healthiest lives possible.
    While endless treats and belly rubs are some people’s idea of the perfect life for Fido, a more important factor plays into the quality of life your pet will have: their health.
    You may have already heard about the benefits of vaccinating your pet for common diseases, but educating yourself more on the subject is important before visiting the veterinarian’s office.
    Allowing vaccines to be a part of your pet’s health care routine can protect them from some of the most common companion animal diseases. Rabies, distemper, hepatitis, Bordetella, parvovirus and feline leukemia are a few of the illnesses that your pet can be protected against through the use of a vaccine.
    Dr. Brad Bennett, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explains how a vaccine can be effective in reducing your pet’s chances of developing a disease. “In developing immunity, vaccines work by mimicking the infection.

  • One-day open house planned at local church

    On Sunday, the United Church will have a community Open House from 3-5 p.m. to invite people to come see the result of the capital improvements over the last four years.
    The Thrift Shop will be open at that time as well. 662-2971. The church is located at 2525 Canyon Road.
    For more information, call 662-2971, or visit unitedchurchla.org.

    Space available for White Rock Artist Market

    The White Rock Artist Market currently has space is available for its two remaining outdoor Artist Markets, Labor Day weekend and the final market for the season Balloon Fiesta on Oct. 3.  Local artists and artisans are encouraged to sell at the market. On average 400-600 visitors go through the White Rock Visitor Center each day in conjunction with the shuttle going to and from Bandelier National Monument.
    The White Rock Artist Market is from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., the first Saturday of every month May through October.  The fee to participate is $25 per market. For more information contact Melanie Peña at 661-4836 or email melanie@losalamos.org. To register for either of the remaining markets visit,  eventbrite.com/white-rock-artist-market-registration.

    Roasted organic green chile at co-op

  • Aug. 16-22, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken parmesan
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver Course
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing

    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    10 a.m.        Low Vision/Hearing-Speaker with Lesley Olsher
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Hot dog
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    1:30 p.m.        “Friends” meeting
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis

  • Senior Hydroelectric Maintenance Technicians Joel Kennedy and Bobby Trujillo have been with the Los Alamos County Department of Public Utilities 18 and 15 years respectively, and Hydroelectric Plant Engineer Adam Cooper joined the team 11 years ago.
    But, on the chance they have reason to visit the department, their fellow employees ask if they are new on the job.
    That is because this crew operates the county’s two hydroelectric plants, located at the El Vado and Abiquiu dams.
    “Some of the citizens don’t even know that there are hydroelectric plants in the state, much less that Los Alamos owns two out of four,” Cooper said.
    The county’s two plants are smaller than the hydro plants at Elephant Butte and Navajo dams, but this three-man team has a full time job keeping them running.
    “These poor guys are just up here, and they are just doing everything, and pretty much invisible to the rest of the county, and really even to the citizens,” said DPU Public Relations Manager Julie Williams-Hill.
    According to Cooper, there is not a typical day.
    “There is no real standard day, which I really like. I don’t like monotony,” Cooper said.