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Today's Features

  • NEW YORK (AP) — You won’t find any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA.
    A three-day art exhibition curated expressly for dogs is attracting hundreds of canines to a marina in lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers are feasting their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.

    The idea is the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie (Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.

    “When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits I noticed that he was having a much better time than I was,” explains Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. “He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists’ resumes, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking, and all dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it.”

    Organizers of the exhibit, which takes its name from Documenta, which takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany, and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.

  • Last weekend, Kim Granzow broke several weightlifting records in her age and weight class, qualifying for the 2018 Nationals Masters Championships to be held in Buffalo, New York. She represented CrossFit Los Alamos at the summer meet held at The Miller Gym in Santa Fe.

    Granzow tied one state record for the 63 kg weight class of the 60-64 year old women’s age group and broke two other records. She tied her old record of 30 kg in the snatch and broke the previous state record from 2011 in the clean and jerk by lifting 39 kg. She also earned the state record for her total of 69 kg.

    While she had done some light weight training in college, it wasn’t until Granzow decided to try CrossFit in Los Alamos in 2012 that she learned the sport of weightlifting. Also referred to as “Olympic lifting” because it is the only barbell sport in the Olympic Games, weightlifting has two events: the snatch and the clean and jerk. In the snatch, the lifter takes the barbell from the ground to overhead in one movement; in the clean and jerk, the barbell goes from the ground to the shoulders and then from the shoulders to overhead.

  • Beginning on Monday, Comcast will remove and replace aerial cable lines located along Trinity Drive from 37th Street to Canyon View as part of a network improvement project for Los Alamos area customers.  

    Work will take place from 10 p.m.-5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

    There will be single lane closures and a flagging operation guiding traffic through the work zone.
    All residents and businesses along the work corridor will receive door tags informing them of the project dates and times.

    For questions about this project, contact CableCom project supervisor Tim Stroman at 505-417-0219.

  • TODAY
    Change Is Our Choice: Creating Climate Solutions at 6 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Change Is Our Choice provides an opportunity to discuss the implications of climate change on our past, present, and future. Learn how to mitigate the effects and ensure a greener, more sustainable future. Participation is FREE, but purchase of the coursebook is REQUIRED.

  • The money they gave Jamy Malone was very important, but even more important to her was the belief members of the White Rock Presbyterian Church had in her.

    That’s what one of the recipients of a $2,500 “Julie’s Helpers” scholarship told the crowd at the Helpers annual picnic July 30.

    “The check was not the most beautiful thing. Don’t get me wrong, I was excited when I got it… but the most beautiful thing was that you saw value in me and that made the biggest difference,” Malone said to the crowd. “I will carry that with me forever. You guys could have given me $100, but it was the words that really touched my heart and gave me more strength to keep going and be an inspiration for my children, to be the rock they need, because sometimes, they’re my rock.”

    A single mother of three, Malone has traveled a tough road.

    She wasn’t expecting the scholarship, she told church members. She applied with the hope that she would get it.

    “So, when I got the phone call saying that I got it, I almost started crying,” she said.

    Malone’s parents divorced when she was in the first grade, and then her education suffered.

  • CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Total solar eclipses occur every year or two or three, often in the middle of nowhere like the South Pacific or Antarctic. What makes the Aug. 21 eclipse so special is that it will cut diagonally across the entire United States.

    The path of totality — where day briefly becomes night — will pass over Oregon, continuing through the heartland all the way to Charleston, South Carolina. Those on the outskirts — well into Canada, Central America and even the top of South America — will be treated to a partial eclipse.

    The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918.

    No tickets are required for this Monday show, just special eclipse glasses so you don’t ruin your eyes.
    Some eclipse tidbits:

    What’s a total solar eclipse?

  • TRENTON, N.J. — A 9-year-old New Jersey boy who described himself as a “Guardian of the Galaxy” is hoping to add the real-life NASA title “Planetary Protection Officer” to his resume.

    NASA received an application for the position from fourth-grader Jack Davis, who asked to apply for the job. In a letter the agency posted online , Jack acknowledged his youth, but said that will make it easier for him to learn how to think like an alien. He said he has seen all the space and alien movies he can see, and he is great at video games.

    “My sister says I am an alien also,” Jack wrote in the hand-written letter dated Aug. 3.

    Jack received a letter from NASA Planetary Science Director James Green encouraging him to study hard so he can one day join them at the agency.

    “We are always looking for bright future scientists and engineers to help us,” Green wrote his response, which was also posted online. Green told Jack the job is about protecting other planets and moons “from our germs” as the agency explores the Solar System.

    Jack also received a phone call from NASA Planetary Research Director Jonathan Rall thanking him for his interest.

  • Come to the Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting on Aug. 22 at the Nature Center to hear from adventurer Forest Altherr about his rock climbing experiences in Yosemite.

    The presentation will begin at 7:15 p.m. The Los Alamos Mountaineers meeting will start at 7 p.m. and cover information about upcoming outings.


    Forest Altherr has explored the cracks, crevasses and faces of Yosemite’s largest granite slabs since 2008. Inspired by the valley’s iconic monoliths, Altherr initially dedicated himself to the craft of honing the intellectual, psychological, and physical skills necessary to climb many of the classic routes on El Capitan. While primarily a rock climber with a taste for big routes,

    Altherr enjoys all aspects of climbing. Not only is the sport thrilling, but it also provides a sense of connection among dedicated climbers worldwide.

    Altherr will explore the contrast between dichotomous styles of big wall climbing: vertical camping and speed climbing.
    The Los Alamos Mountaineers meetings are always free to the public, and no registration is required.

  • By The Pajarito Conservation Allaince

  • At sundown on July 31, Jews around the world observed Tisha B’av, the most somber of Jewish holidays. It commemorates the destruction of the two temples in Jerusalem, first by the Babylonians and then, almost seven centuries later, in A.D. 70, by the Romans.

    Jews will remember these two historic calamities along with many others, including their slaughter during the First Crusade; the expulsions from England, France and Spain; and the Holocaust.The pattern of forced migration was set by the Babylonian conquest of 587-586 B.C., when the elite of Judah were marched to Babylon and the temple destroyed.

    Like the story of Moses and the Exodus from Egypt, which happened several centuries earlier, the Babylonian exile dwells at the heart of Judaism. The trauma served as a crucible, forcing the Israelites to rethink their relationship to Yahweh, reassess their standing as a chosen people and rewrite their history.

    Psalm 137, the subject of my most recent book, “Song of Exile,” is a 2,500-year-old Hebrew poem that deals with the exile that will be remembered on Tisha B’av. It has long served as an uplifting historical analogy for a variety of oppressed and subjugated groups, including African-Americans.

    Origins of the psalm