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Today's Features

  • SATURDAY
    The final White Rock Artist Market will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. outside the White Rock Visitor Center. This is the last Artist Market for the summer and will return Memorial Weekend 2018. The White Rock Visitor Center is located at 115 NM State Road 4 and is open daily from 8 a.m.-6 p.m. For information about the White Rock Artist Markets, contact Melanie Peña at 661-4836 or email melanie@losalamos.org.

    Bigfoot BBQ and & Blues Fest from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. in Jemez Springs. Festival will include a barbecue, music and lecture to celebrate Bigfoot. 1 Jemez Plaza, Jemez Springs.
    TUESDAY
    Charles Strickfaden will present “Partnership Parks in the 21st Century – Building a national park from nothing: Manhattan Project Historical Park (with a perspective by Valles Caldera National Preserve staff)” at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Strickfaden, the Los Alamos Site Manager, will enlighten attendees on some of the efforts required to initiate, design and develop a newly established unit of the National Park Service. Please join us at PEEC to ask questions and find out about volunteer opportunities with this growing park.

  • Kelly Hall of the Trinity-on-the-Hill Church transformed into a beautifully decorated high tea for women (and men) of all ages Saturday who came to watch a parade of fashions, sip tea and contribute to a local missions group.

    The seventh-annual Tea and Fashion Show fundraiser, which is the biggest fundraiser for the House of Hope building group, was able to collect over half of their financial goal from the event.

    Between the tickets, silent auction and donations, House of Hope made about $5,000. On top of that, a private donator offered to match, up to a certain amount, the funds raised through the silent auction.

    House of Hope builds homes for families in need in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico and that requires over $10,000 per home. All of the money goes toward building that home because the builders pay their own room and board while in Juarez.

    The classical piano music provided by Joe Cox created the perfect ambiance to mingle with friends, peer at silent auction items and taste a multitude of different teas.

    “I think it went very well,” said Nancy Coombs, who helped organize the event overall, including the silent auction. Coombs said, “The people that came said they had a lovely time,” and some were talking about it at church the next day.

  • BY WREN PROPP
    Special to the Monitor

    A treasure of the Española Valley’s creative community will be celebrating its 20th anniversary in mid-September, a result of hard work, strong roots and a growing national spotlight, organizers say.

    Within the 7,000 square feet of its storefront building on Paseo de Onate in Española, the Española Valley Fiber Arts Center fosters fiber arts of many types and textures. A public celebration of the center’s longevity and future will be 1-4 p.m. on Sept. 16 at the center.

    “It’s unique. It’s really a national gem because it’s given a place for this,” art and craft, said Bethe S. Orrell, a former director of the nonprofit center.

    Weavers, knitters, colcha artists, felters, students and professionals, have been drawn to the center over the years. It offers classes in many styles of fiber arts from nationally recognized artists, as well as a retail store for finished products and materials, where prices are comparable. A library, work spaces for some techniques and a large room of looms are all part of the mix.

  • As the sky grew dim Monday, residents and tourists from all over Los Alamos County got their fill of the historic eclipse as it made it’s way across the U.S. 

    The eclipse only made 75 percent totality in a mostly cloudy sky, but many viewers who came out to see the event enjoyed the show. 

    When the eclipse hit its peak, the sun broke through just enough at Bandelier National Park’s Visitor Center to elicit oohs and aahs from the audience looking with their special glasses provided rangers provided. 

    “I thought it went fine, especially when you consider it was significantly overcast,” Bandelier Park Ranger Meredith Peterson said. “It was interesting to watch it with the cloud cover too, because every once in a while you got a little bit of a shadow from the clouds, so you got to see it from a different perspective.” 

  • A new event in Jemez Springs is sure to stir up some enthusiasm over Labor Day weekend – the first ever Big Foot Barbecue and Blues Fest, Sept. 2 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 

    The event will feature guest speaker and Bigfoot researcher and author, Dr. Christopher Dyer, a University of New Mexico professor.

    The event was originated by resident Felix Nuñez who has been fascinated with the idea of the elusive Bigfoot creature, following several unexplainable sounds he’s heard and documented in the Jemez Mountains over the years.

    “Although I don’t want to hang my hat on Bigfoot’s existence, I think there’s been a lot of fascinating audio and video clips that can only be described as ‘unexplainable’ but real to those who have had personal encounters,” said Nuñez. “Whether you believe in Bigfoot or not, this event is for everyone who wants to enjoy live music, the beautiful Jemez Valley and hear from one of New Mexico’s top Bigfoot experts.”

  • BY DEBBIE STONE

     

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    Special to the Monitor

    An overactive imagination can really play a number on you, especially when it concerns ghosts. I confess I’m not one who believes in the paranormal world, as I’m a skeptic at heart. I rely on science to explain the unexplained, choosing to go the rational route when in doubt. Hearing accounts from others who have seen spectral images or felt otherworldly presences around them typically elicits a raised eyebrow or hearty guffaw from me. 

  • ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Organizers of one of North America’s most prominent American Indian powwows say they’re already gearing up for next year’s event.

    They kicked off their promotional campaign for the 2018 Gathering of Nations on Friday with the release of the event’s official poster.

    The 35th annual event takes place April 26-28 at the state fairgrounds in Albuquerque. The Miss Indian World Talent Competition will be held downtown at the city’s convention center.

    New for next year will be a parade featuring Native American riders in full regalia. Organizers say the parade is meant to recognize the importance that the horse culture holds for some tribes.

     

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    The gathering usually draws tens of thousands of people, including dancers, singers and drummers representing tribes from across the United States, Canada and elsewhere.

  • The heart of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains has long called out to the singer-songwriter as part inspiration and part haven for their craft. 

    Red River, New Mexico, is the center of this musical mecca and celebrates again with world class talent at the third-annual Red River Folk Festival, set for Sept. 21-24. 

    Venues include the Lost Love Saloon, Brandenburg Park, the Motherlode and Bittercreek Ranch. 

    Early Bird Tickets are still available for the musical feast, featuring James McMurtry, Shawn Mullins, Chuck Prophet, Jim Lauderdale, Max Gomez and more.

    Paired with the popular Aspencade Arts and Crafts Fair, there are local and national musical acts on the outside stage during the day in Brandenburg Park including Honey House – an all-female folk group powerhouse, Mariachi, Jed Zimmerman and Kelley Mickwee, the Red River Family Band along with other fun surprises. 

  • Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board. 

     

    Friday, August 25, 2017

    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live

    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 8-08-17

    1:00 PM Democracy Now!

    2:00 PM United in Christ

    3:00 PM Road to Recovery

    4:00 PM Uprising

    5:00 PM Democracy Now!

    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Housing in Los Alamos

    7:00 PM Suspended Moment – Los Alamos

    8:00 PM Los Alamos High School Graduation

    10:00 PM Living Treasures Ceremony

  • By TIM DAHLBERG, AP Boxing Writer

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Conor McGregor's improbable challenge of Floyd Mayweather Jr. could be seen by a staggering 50 million people in the United States as fans and the curious gather in small and large parties.

    The fight Saturday night threatens the pay-per-view revenue record set by Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao two years ago and could dwarf it in viewership as people use the event as a reason to have friends and family over for a little escapism and controlled violence.

    "It's a cultural event that crosses all demographics and all social and economic factors," said Mark Taffet, who formerly ran pay-per-view for HBO. "People are getting together to have a great time and we surely need an excuse to have a great time."

    Taffet said that while an average of 5-6 people normally watches a pay-per-view, he wouldn't be surprised if the fight averages 10 people a household. If it sells 5 million pay-per-views as widely anticipated, the fight could be watched by nearly one in six Americans.

    The fight will also be seen by millions more worldwide, with promoters claiming it will be available either online or on a TV screen to more than 1 billion homes in 200 different countries.