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Today's Features

  • The Los Alamos History Museum will present a lecture by Sharon Snyder at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge, called “How Los Alamos Became a Ranch School:  A Homesteader’s Farmhouse, a Few Sheds, and a Muddy Puddle of Water.”

    The lecture is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2017-2018 lecture series “100 Years on the Pajarito Plateau.” This lecture series is sponsored by Raffi Andonian and Nicole Kiebert.

    The ranch school that existed here between 1917 and 1943 was special, and developed into one of the best schools of its kind throughout the West, earning a national reputation among all prep schools. Sharon Snyder will be presenting a talk on topics ranging from how Ashley Pond Jr. ended up in New Mexico and became the partner of Harold Brook, the homesteader whose land eventually held the school, to who financed the expansion of the school as it grew, and why did the boys wear shorts in the winter and sleep on screened porches year round? Learn the answers to these questions and more at the third lecture in the 2017-2018 Historical Society’s lecture series this Tuesday.

    Snyder is the award-winning biographer, author and poet of Peggy Pond Church, as well as the Publications Director of Bathtub Row Press, the publishing house of the Los Alamos Historical Society.

  • November is Native American Heritage month. An additional focus takes place the day after Thanksgiving, called Native American Heritage Day.

    Jessica “Jaylyn” Atsye of the Laguna Pueblo began an event in 2010 called Rock Your Mocs Week. This year the week takes place Nov. 12-18. It will be the third year Los Alamos supports the effort by Rockin our Mocs.

    It is a chance for Native Americans, both youth and adults, from all backgrounds, to wear their moccasins for a day or the week and share their pride and culture. The traditional moccasins are as different as the people who will wear them.

    A friend of mine, Deb Minyard from Pojoaque High School, received a pair as a gift when she was the 2015 New Mexico Teacher of the Year. Her student, Nessa, asked if she could give her a handmade pair as a gift. When Minyard accepted, the student measured her feet in the traditional way, by tracing them.

    The handmade moccasins were crafted by Bernard Mora of the Tesuque Pueblo. The beautiful gift brought Minyard to tears, making her feel like a part of the student’s family. Minyard considers the gift one of her most treasured possessions.

  • Permits to cut your own Christmas tree on the Santa Fe National Forest go on sale Monday at forest headquarters at all ranger district offices and select third-party vendors.

    As part of the “Every Kid in a Park” initiative, every fourth-grader is eligible for a free holiday tree permit.  In order to redeem the free permit, the student must present a valid fourth-grade pass, downloadable at everykidinapark.gov.

    Once the pass is printed out, the fourth-graders must bring a parent or guardian over the age of 18 with them to the nearest SFNF office to pick up the permit. The free permits can only be fulfilled at a Santa Fe National Forest office.

    The nonrefundable Christmas tree permits are for personal use only and may be purchased for $10 by check, credit/debit card or cash through Dec. 23. Permit purchasers will receive a tree tag, map and guidelines for harvesting a tree.

    One tag is valid for a tree up to 5-inches in diameter and 10-feet in height. Trees taller than 10 feet and/or wider than 5-inches require an additional tag. For example, a 15-foot tree requires two tags.

    The Santa Fe National Forest has a three-tag limit per person.

  • Sipapu Ski Resort’s ski area’s opening day has been postponed ski area is delaying its opening a week due to unseasonably warm temperatures, resort officials announced Tuesday.

    The resort was originally scheduled to open on Saturday, one of the earliest openings in resort history.

    Temperatures will drop again this week, which is ideal for snowmaking, and snow was in the forecast for Tuesday. Cold temperatures have allowed Sipapu’s crews to make snow already on beginner and intermediate trails: Thumper, Lower Bambi and Butterfly. They will continue snowmaking efforts as temperatures allow.

    “Our mountain crews continue to monitor temperatures and we’ve made snow whenever we could,” said John Paul Bradley, mountain manager of Sipapu.

    The team was continuing to prepare the mountain for opening day, which was targeted as Nov. 18, as conditions allow, Bradley said in a release.

    “We feel confident with the progress we’ve already made that we’ll be able to open on the 18th,” he said.
    Sipapu Ski Resort is known for being the first resort to open and the last to close in New Mexico. Last year, Sipapu opened on Nov. 19, 2016, continuing the 14-year trend as being the first to open in the state.

  • All Santa Fe National Forest offices will be closed Friday, in observance of Veterans Day, which honors the service of all who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Forest offices will resume regular business hours on Monday.
    Anyone who plans to visit the Santa Fe National Forest over the weekend should know before they go. 
    Check the weather forecast, and be prepared for seasonal fluctuations. Use good judgment and basic safety precautions when hiking, fishing or camping on the SFNF.  Although fire danger has decreased across the SFNF, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority.  Never leave a campfire unattended, and make sure it is out cold before leaving the area.
    For more information, contact the local ranger district or forest headquarters at 438-5300. Follow the SFNF on Twitter (@SantafeNF) and Facebook.

  • TODAY
    Pueblo Canyon Geology Walk at 12:30 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Hear about the geology of Pueblo Canyon from Elaine Jacobs while hiking the gentle Pueblo Canyon Rim Trail. Free.
    THURSDAY
    Fall prevention presentation
from 2-3 p.m. at Aspen Ridge Assisted Living, 1010 Sombrillo Court in the Recreation Room. Presenters will be Donna McHenry, EMS, Pauline Schneider, the senior center director, and Cynthia Goldblatt, Los Alamos Retirement Community community liaison. Community is invited.  Refreshments will be served. No RSVP required. Contact Goldblatt at 695-8981 for information.

    Los Alamos Genealogical Association meeting at 7 p.m. at the Mesa Public Library. The program will be presented by Irma Holtkamp. The subject will be “Using Clues in Census Records to Find Your Family in Other Sources.” The traditional no-host social dinner will convene earlier that evening at 5:30 p.m. at the China Moon restaurant.
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Astronomy Show: Inside the Sun at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Explore our local star with Dr. Joyce Ann Guzik. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY

  • El Centro Family Health Clinic and the Santa Fe National Forest are sponsoring a hike along Window Rock Trail on Nov. 18 as part of an initiative for “Forest Your Health.” The biannual hike to scenic Window Rock is an 8-mile round-trip trek to one of the most state’s largest rock spans, a “window” worn out of igneous rock.

    The hike is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. at the trailhead north of Española on the road to Abiquiu – with the hike ending at 5 p.m., after sharing hot dogs and s’mores over a campfire. Dress accordingly with long pants, hiking boots and leather gloves – participants will be picking up trash along the hike.

    For more information, contact Jennifer Sublett, at jsabulett@fs.fed.us or 753-7331.

  • The Los Alamos County Ice Rink’s is set to open its winter season with a free skating lessons event at 11:30 a.m. Nov. 15.

    Free mini-skating lessons will be free for children 10 and under from 1:30–2 p.m. and children  11 to adult can try free lessons from 2:15–2:45 p.m.

    Registration for skate lessons is now open online or available at the Walkup Aquatic Center.

    Prior to opening day, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us (click on Recreation) or email lacrec@lacnm.us for more information.

  • Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra fans are in for a treat this year when the orchestra welcomes premier cello soloist Wendy Warner to the stage Nov. 4, at Crossroads Bible Church. 

    Together, with longtime friend and LASO Conductor David Chavez, they will present the Saint-Sens Concerto No. 1.

    Warner came to fame when she made her debut with the Chicago Symphony at 14. In 1990, she won the top prize at the Fourth Annual Rostropovich Competition four years later.

    Chavez first met Warner when he was playing with the then New Mexico Symphony Orchestra. At the time, she was a guest soloist, performing a cello concerto by Dvorak.

    “Wendy and I have sustained a wonderful friendship over the years, and I am lucky to have kept my relationship with her,” Chavez said.

    This season, Warner has performed with orchestras and musical groups in China and Peru. In the U.S. she has performed with symphonies in Wichita Kansas and other places in the U.S.

    When she’s not traveling, she teaches music at the Schwob School of Music in Columbus, Geogia.

  • By MATT O'BRIEN, AP Technology Writer

    Don't throw away your Stephen King collection just yet. But the Master of the Macabre might want to keep an eye out behind him, because scientists have just unleashed a nightmare machine on a mission to churn out its own bone-chilling tales.

    MIT researchers have applied the electrodes and brought to life a new fiction-writing bot they call Shelley — after "Frankenstein" author Mary Shelley. To keep the bot busy — no wandering the countryside terrorizing villagers! — the team gave it a crash course in the horror genre, forcing it to read 140,000 stories published by amateur writers on a popular online forum.

    Now Shelley's artificial neural network is generating its own stories , posting opening lines on Twitter, then taking turns with humans in collaborative storytelling.

    COLD, CALCULATING HORROR

    "She's creating really interesting and weird stories that have never really existed in the horror genre," said Pinar Yanardag, a postdoctoral researcher at the MIT Media Lab. One strange tale, for instance, involved a pregnant man who woke up in a hospital.