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Today's Features

  • Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Reel Deal Theater will show “Racing Extinction,” an undercover documentary exposing the hidden world of endangered species and the race to protect them from mass extinction, at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    This film is $10 for adults and $8 for seniors, students and children. Tickets are available at the Reel Deal Theater.
    Produced by Oceanic Preservation Society, the group behind the Academy Award®-winning film The Cove, Racing Extinction brings a voice to the thousands of species teetering on the very edge of life. This highly charged, impassioned collective of activists sets out to expose the two major threats to endangered wild species across the globe. The first comes from the international wildlife trade, and the medicinal “cures” and tonics that are marketed to the public at the expense of rare creatures. The second threat is carbon emissions and acidified oceans that are incompatible with existing animal life. Both threats are made clear in “Racing Extinction” through investigative reporting, undercover photography and covert operations.
    For more information about this and other programs offered by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    The Museum of International Folk Art will host the national touring exhibition Quilts of Southwest China, beginning July 9 through Jan. 21, 2018. While both highly valued and culturally significant, Chinese quilts have received little attention from scholars, collectors, and museums and little is known about them outside of the communities that make them. Works featured in the exhibition come from the collections of MOIFA, MSUM, the partnering Chinese museums and private lenders. A new bilingual publication (in English and Mandarin) accompanies the exhibition. Museum location is 706 Camino Lejo.

  • Artists Jamie Winslow and Elaine Bradshaw will celebrate spring in O’Keefe country with the exhibit “A Sense of Place,” a show of engaging paintings and 3D works.
    Free and open to all ages, the art can be viewed daily from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. from April 29-May 28 at the Galleria Arriba at Abiquiu Inn.
    A public reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. May 5. During this time (and other times by appointment), the artists will be available to explain their techniques, answer questions and help visitors select pieces.
    About the artists
    Bradshaw paints “to celebrate the life force of the natural world, especially here in the high desert.” Through her energetic, colorful acrylic images, she hopes to help viewers to become more aware of and to connect with their own environments. She will display some fused glass works, as well.
    Winslow is a painter and sculptor who aims to intrigue viewers and to draw them into thoughtful dialogue with her pieces. She uses various media to express herself, and notes that her work  “has been described as organic, ethnic, contemporary and sometimes whimsical.” She delights in the joy that her art brings to her own life and to her collectors.

  • The Unitarian Church of Los Alamos will host “Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition & New World Identities,” a special lecture-recital on Ladino (Judeo-Spanish) Romanceros, Coplas and Kantigas at 3 p.m. on Saturday.

    This program was previously presented at the New Mexico History Museum’s Fractured Faiths Symposium, as part of their six-month special exhibit in the fall of 2016.

    The event features soprano Christina Martos and pianist Debra Ayers performing works by Ofer Ben-Amots, an Israeli-American composer and chair of the music department at Colorado College.

    Ben-Amots will lecture about his recreations of musical settings for songs dating to the era of the Jewish diaspora in Spain, a time that gave rise to the unique hybrid of Hebrew and Spanish known as Ladino.

    Los Alamos soprano Martos sang several seasons with Central City Opera in Colorado and the Washington National Opera, and most recently performed at the world premiere of Los Bufones by Santa Fe composer Ron Strauss at the National Hispanic Cultural Center.

  • “It began at Bethel.” With these words, historian and educator Dr. Martha Bouyer proceeded to take me back in time to the birth of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. “The Movement,” as its members called it, started at Bethel Baptist Church, under the steerage of the church’s fiery pastor, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. It was Shuttlesworth who organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) after the State of Alabama declared the NAACP a foreign corporation which could no longer exist. This was in response to the Reverend’s refusal to turn over the names of the local members of the organization.
    To many, Shuttlesworth’s name might be unfamiliar. I was unaware of this man’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement until I visited Birmingham on an historical tourism trip. Shuttlesworth emerged as a “hidden figure,” who was often shadowed by other such well-known leaders of the time as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Ralph Abernathy. But, it was Shuttlesworth who initially galvanized the black community with the aim of dismantling the city’s segregation ordinances. He was the spark that created the flame.

  • Los Alamos native and poet Allison Cobb will return for a special event Sunday to celebrate National Poetry Month.
    Cobb will read from her new poetry book, “After We All Died,” and an ongoing project, “Plastic: an autobiography,” both of which feature Los Alamos, at 1 p.m. Sunday at White Rock Branch Library in the multi-purpose room, 10 Sherwood Blvd., White Rock.
    Cobb is the author of “Born 2” (Chax Press); “Green-Wood” (Factory School); “Plastic: an autobiography” (Essay Press EP series); and “After We All Died” (Ahsahta Press), which was a finalist for the National Poetry Series.
    Cobb works for the Environmental Defense Fund and lives in Portland, Oregon, where she co-curates The Switch reading, art, and performance series.
    Cobb’s work combines historical and scientific research, essay and poetry to address issues of landscape, politics and ecology.
    She was a 2015 finalist for the National Poetry Series; a 2015 Djerassi Resident Artist; a 2014 Playa Resident Artist; received a 2011 Individual Artist Fellowship award from the Oregon Arts Commission; and was a 2009 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow.

  • Have you ever wondered what goes on in the life of a busy bee? The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offers a workshop with Dorothy Brown at the Los Alamos Nature Center about the biology and colony dynamics of honeybees from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday.
    This will be a great introduction for anyone curious about these non-native pollinators.
    What is happening inside the seemingly crowded honeybee colonies? Dorothy Brown will discuss the three castes of honeybee and how they contribute to the super-organism called the colony.
    Participants will take a journey through the hive and learn all about the complexities that make a colony work. This workshop is perfect for those considering starting to keep bees.
    Brown started Langstroth beekeeping in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York in 1974. She later kept some colonies in the Bay Area of Northern California. In 2006, she and Kate Whealen both took the Ecoversity class in topbar beekeeping taught by Les Crowder. She has a degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University and keeps a topbar colony on her carport roof in Los Alamos.
    Registration is required for this program, and is available at peecnature.org or by calling 662-0460. The cost is $8 for PEEC members and $10 for non-members.

  • BY DAVID LONGENBACK
    Pennsylvania State University

  • TODAY
    The Arts Council will host the April Brown Bag Performance at noon in the Pajarito Room of Fuller Lodge. Piano virtuoso Juanita Madland will present compositions by J.S. Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schubert, Schumann, Ginastera, and an original piece. This concert will also be presented in Minneapolis in May. This spring Juanita will play her fifth harpsichord concert.
    THURSDAY
    Gardening for Backyard Birds
from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center. Learn from Master Gardeners how to invite birds to your yard and garden. Free.
    FRIDAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    The Jemez Thrift Store will have a bag day from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. today.

    Tour of the Friedman Recycling Facility from 8:30-4 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Tour New Mexico’s state of the art recycling facility. Free. Lunch available for $13 or $14.

    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.
     
    April Night Sky Show
 from 7-8 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Discover and identify objects visible in our night sky this month, and enjoy their beauty from our planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY

  • Fidelity and appearances take centerstage in “In the Mood for Love” (2000, rated PG, subtitled), showing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater.
    The free screening is part of the Mesa Public Library Free Film Series.
    Writer and director Kar-Wai Wong’s internationally award-winning film – including best actor (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) and technical grand prize at Cannes – delights in the styles and cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong, and delights in fomenting questions about loyalty, sexuality, pride and decorum.
    Mrs. Chan (Maggie Cheung) and Mr. Chow (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) have recently become neighbors in a crowded apartment building. Both of their spouses travel frequently, leaving Chan and Chow to become friends in their absence.
    It doesn’t take long for Chan and Chow to realize that their spouses are often away at the same time, and that they are having an affair.