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Today's Features

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    TODAY

    Today- March 14 —
    Galactic Adventurers
    from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore stars, planets, robots, satellites, and solar systems with PEEC! This four-session class is for upper elementary age (third- sixth-grade) and meets every Wednesday. Cost is $75 for non-members, $60 for PEEC members. 

     

    Science on Tap at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square. Join the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this very important field. 

    THURSDAY

    Coffee and Connections at 10 a.m. at Ruby K’s Bagel Café. Come join the group for an hour of caffeine and networking. Coffee Connection is a fun, monthly morning networking event for chamber members only. It’s not just coffee; it’s about fostering relationships and building up a strong professional network.

    FRIDAY

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    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC 8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board. 

     

    Friday, February 23, 2018

    6:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live

    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program

    11:00 AM County Council Meeting –Replay 2-13-18

    1:00 PM Democracy Now!

    4:00 PM Uprising

    5:00 PM Democracy Now!

    6:00 PM Chamber Business Breakfast – Harry Burgess

    7:00 PM Los Alamos History – A History of Land Transfers on the Pajarito Plateau

    8:00 PM Art Fusion – Live Radio Show with Dr. Hall & Brad Smith

    8:30 PM The LA Times with Peter Malmgren

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    The Los Alamos Community Winds will host “Joyride! A Journey in Music” Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church.

    LACW, an amateur wind ensemble formed by members of the greater Los Alamos community, will perform several popular selections such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade, op. 35 - IV. The Thief of Baghdad,” Franz von Suppé’s “Light Cavalry Overture,” and Percy Aldridge Grainger’s “Irish Tune from County Derry” and Shepherd’s “Hey.” 

    The Winds will also showcase several obscure pieces such as “On Parade,” by John Philip Sousa, Michael Markowski’s “Joyride,” Robert W. Smith’s “Songs of Sailor and Sea,” and Leonard Bernstein’s “Slava!” 

    In agreement with the title of the concert, the program provides a journey in music through the inclusion of operettas, symphonic suites, folk tunes and marches. 

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    NEW YORK — A lavish, headline-grabbing premiere. Lightning word-of-mouth stoked by glowing reviews. Packed movie theaters with sold-out shows, long lines and fans decked out as characters from the film.

    The phenomenon of “Black Panther” had the look and feel of a classic, bona fide blockbuster in route to its record-setting $201.8 million debut over the weekend, or an estimated $235 million Friday through Monday. Much has been made about the film industry’s struggles to tap into pop culture the way it once more regularly did – that TV and streaming options and a dearth of fresh ideas have diminished the power of the big screen.

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    LONDON (AP) — Queen Elizabeth II has always dressed with style and flair – but Tuesday marked her first visit to the showy catwalks of London Fashion Week.

    The monarch squeezed in the front row, chatting with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour — who wore her trademark sunglasses — and presented an award recognizing British design excellence.

    It was an unusual outing for the 91-year-old monarch, who seemed totally at ease at the type of event usually frequented by stars like Kate Moss and Sienna Miller. She was elegant in a Angela Kelly duck egg blue tweed dress and jacket detailed with tiny aquamarine Swarovski crystals set off by formal black gloves.

    Elizabeth carried a matching handbag – of course – and wore her mostly white hair swept back. The queen didn’t bother with the statement stiletto heels favored by many of the younger fashionistas, opting for sensible dark low-heeled court shoes for the awards presentation.

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    New drugs are under constant development but most fail in clinical trials. Why do so many drugs pass animal testing, but fail in Phase 1 clinical trials in humans? Are animal models of human diseases ultimately really a good model for humans?

    Enter ATHENA. ATHENA, which stands for Advanced Tissue-engineered Human External Network Analyzer, is designed to simulate organ systems – such as liver, heart, lung, and kidney – and can be used as a first-line test for potential toxicity analysis since the system can mimic the response of actual human organs. Such research could lead to faster approval and fewer potential side effects for new medications coming onto the market.

    Join Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this important field. Science On Tap is today 1 beginning at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked, 145 Central Park Square.

    Bring your Bradbury Science Museum Association membership card (or join on the spot – at very reasonable rates) and get $1 off your food and/or drink at Science On Tap.

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    The Los Alamos County Library System will present the celebrated acoustic duo Hungrytown at 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave. 

     

    Last July, they returned from a successful six-and-a-half-month tour of the US, UK and New Zealand, covering over 16,000 miles in the U.S. 

    Hungrytown is currently on a four-month tour of the American south and southwest.

    Vermonters Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson, who make up Hungrytown, have been touring professionally for nearly 15 years. 

    Hungrytown’s songs and music have appeared in numerous television programs, including IFC’s “Portlandia,” Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and Neftlix’s new comedy, Lady Dynamite,” as well as various documentaries and major sporting events ranging from NASCAR to Hockey Night in Canada.

    Their third and latest album, “Further West,” made the top 10 on the American Folk DJ charts for two months, and at least 14 “Best of the year” lists. 

  • What is it like to photograph wildland fires and firefighters? Kristen Honig will discuss her observations, show her photographs, and give a behind the scenes look at what it is like to be a wildfire photographer at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Nature Center.

    Honig’s wildfire photos have been recognized by National Geographic and featured in numerous magazines and publications, including Popular Science, Outside Magazine, High Country News, Wildland Firefighter Magazine, Fire Management Today, and in the novel “On the Burning Edge.”

    This special presentation at the Los Alamos Nature Center is free and made possible thanks to the Los Alamos Photo Club and the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.

    Los Alamos and the surrounding areas have been exposed to more than a half-dozen significant wildfires since 1977, including the 2000 Cerro Grande Fire that consumed more than 47,000 acres and damaged or destroyed more than 350 structures. The Cerro Grande Fire had a lasting impact on the community and inspired local photographer Honig to document not only the beauty and destructiveness of wildfires but also the sacrifices and camaraderie of the firefighters who battle them.

  • Poet David Mutschlecner will read from his latest book of poetry “Icon” as the latest offering in Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak series.

    The reading starts at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Upstairs Rotunda of Mesa Public Library, 2400 Central Ave.
    Mutschlecner’s published work includes the poetry books “Esse,” “Sign” and “Enigma and Light” from Ahsahta Press, and “Veils” from Stride Press.

    With “Icon” Mutschlecner continues his exploration of theopoetics, which is “where poetry shines a light into theology, cleansing it of dogmatism while nurturing inclusivity.”

    He views poetry as a place where “intensifications of reality occur.” Poems from “Icon” will also appear in “New American Writing.”

    Ahsahta Press prides itself on championing and promoting “surprising, relevant and accessible experimental poetry that more commercially minded small presses avoid.”

    Although Ahsahta is the press affiliated with the University of Idaho, there are many connections to Los Alamos and northern New Mexico.

  • The United Church of Los Alamos is seeking donations for their Mexico Mission community auction in March. Items can be brought to 2525 Canyon Road and questions answered at 662-2971. Large items may be able to request a pick up.
    Adults from the United Church and the Unitarian Church will build homes for the poor during spring break.