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Today's Features

  • Reminder: It is time to submit entries for the Friends of the Shelter Calendar. Do it online at calendar.lafos.org. If you have adopted a shelter pet, particularly a pet from the Los Alamos Animal Shelter, consider adding their photograph to the 2016 calendar.
    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home. Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Cupcake — A 4-year-old, calico, who still learning about shelter life and slowly adjusting. She has a gorgeous coat that she would love to show off to new visitors! Young kids might be a bit too rambunctious for her, but she does enjoy the company of older children and adults. Cupcake is hoping that you’ll stop in so she can show you how sweet she is and take her home!

  • Community calendar

     

    Recurring meetings

     

    Note: If any of the following listings need to be changed or removed, contact the community editor immediately at lacommunity@lamonitor.com, or 662-4185, ext. 21.

     

    Nature Playtimes at the Nature Center. 10-11 a.m. Kids aged 0-5 and their caregivers come to the Los Alamos Nature Center to explore the natural world. Children rotate through themed centers inside and outside, with story time to start them off. Mondays except holidays. Free. More information at losalamosnature.org.

     

    CoDA, an open 12-step group for recovery from codependency, meets every Monday at 7 p.m. at White Rock Methodist Church on Meadow Lane. For information call 672-3874 or 672-1498.

     

    The Los Alamos Table Tennis Club meets from 7:30-10 p.m. Tuesdays; and from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturdays, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center, lower level. On Tuesday, there is a fee of $2 per player. There is no charge on Saturday. For more information, contact Avadh Saxena at AVADH—S@hotmail.com or Ed Stein at 662-7472.

     

  •  All parents of current Los Alamos High School freshmen are invited to attend Freshmen Parent Night on Monday beginning at 6 p.m. in the Speech Theater.
    “This is our second year hosting a Freshmen Parent Night,” said Cindy Black, one of the guidance counselors at the high school. “It gives us one more opportunity to answer any lingering questions parents and students may have about the first year of high school.”
    Topics to be covered at Freshmen Parent Night will include Freshmen Academy, credit requirements, the new Academic Support Center, Academic Time, Saturday School and Naviance.
    For more information about Freshmen Parent Night, contact the LAHS Guidance Office at 663-2797.

  • If you’re looking into a new pet but don’t want to settle for the usual cat or dog, geese might be a good pet for you.
    In order to own pet geese, you must have adequate space and check with city guidelines and neighborhood associations to make sure backyard poultry, ducks and geese are allowed in your area.
    Although many of us have heard the horror stories of aggressive geese attacking park visitors, pet geese who are hand raised and handled daily are often more docile.
    Before you jump into owning geese, there are a few things you should know and consider in order to create a comfortable living environment where your geese can thrive.
    Your first step in owning pet geese is choosing the right breed. There are a number of breeds to choose from, many of them making great pets. Dr. Sharman Hoppes, clinical associate professor for the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommends breeds like the Toulouse, the American Buff and the Pilgrim, as these breeds are considered to be good pets by her clients.
    Geese are also flock animals, so consider getting 2-3 geese to help create a more natural environment. Females are less likely to fight with one another, so they may make a better option as pets.

  • To live in northern New Mexico is to be surrounded by rugged beauty. But what happens if a medical emergency happens out in the wilderness? Luckily Classic Air Medical, a helicopter medical transport service, is ready to help.
    Meet pilot Geoff Rodgers and the medical team at 7 p.m. Tuesday, to discuss the work of this helicopter rescue company and how they work with the local community.
    Rodgers is a former Los Alamos county councilor and current pilot for Classic Air Medical. He served as a pilot for both the U.S. Army and the U.S. Army Reserves, and also has experience flying for EMS, firefighting and powerline construction operations.
    Classic Air Medical began as Classic Tour Helicopters, a helicopter tour service operating around Bryce Canyon. Over the years, the increased need in emergency transportation and search and rescue operations led Classic Air Medical to change its focus from tourism to its current mission of emergency air transportation services. It serves not only New Mexico, but also Wyoming, Oregon, Colorado and Arizona.
    The talk will be at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road. It is free to attend, and no registration is required. For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org, or call 662-0460.

  • The Los Alamos Co-op Market is holding a Harvest Festival Saturday to celebrate local food, including Colorado peaches and organic green chile from Seco Spice.
    Triny Vigil, the interim general manager will grill green chile cheeseburgers using local beef from Sweet Grass Co-op in Colorado. They will also offer veggie green chile cheeseburgers.
    Most activities will be from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. including chair massages by Trish Walk-Hopkins, from Mariposa Body, and the children’s bouncy house, donated by Little Forest Playschool.
    Dr. Wendy Van Dilla, of naturopathic physician and owner of Holistic Health Care will offer demonstrations of low-level laser therapy from
    9 a.m.- 2 p.m.
    In addition to food and relaxation, Tim Martinez, a local farmer from Velarde, will share his knowledge of farming in the Rio Grande Basin.
    For more information about the co-op’s Harvest Festival, visit the co-op’s website losalamos.coop.
    The Los Alamos Co-op Market provides the community with access to a wide variety of local, natural, and organic foods and can be found at 95 Entrada Dr.
    Check the website losalamos.coop, or call the co-op at 695-1579 for more information.

  • Life-sized mannequins, piles of medical equipment and extensive checklists filled the testing room during the last day of University of New Mexico-Los Alamos EMT-Basic class recently as students endeavored to diagnose and treat their “patients.” They were taking practical and written tests to finish the 10-credit core course that enables them to sit for the National Registry Exam to be certified Emergency Medical Technicians or EMTs.
    The EMT certification is a stepping-stone to become a paramedic or other medical professional, and EMTs can work in pre-hospital environments, such as patient transport, fire departments and police departments. EMT-Basic is a core class of UNM-LA’s Associate of Science degree, and also serves students pursuing bachelors and medical degrees, or individuals who need emergency responder skills.
    “My test scenario was a man with shortness of breath having an anaphylactic reaction,” said student Holly Erickson, a junior at Clemson University in South Carolina, describing her final exam in EMT-Basic. “I found out he was allergic to peanuts and gave him epinephrine.”

  • Since the Las Conchas fire, many areas of the Pajarito Plateau are in stream channel stabilization and floodplain restoration.
    To help in this effort, join Chick Keller to collect grass seeds and look at other interesting native plants. These seeds will be used next spring in the post-fire restoration project along Frijoles Creek near the Visitor Center in Bandelier National Monument.
    The project, managed by Keystone Restoration Ecology, is part of a New Mexico River Stewardship grant to protect New Mexico’s water quality and resources.
    Three seed collection hikes are currently scheduled. The first will be Friday, with more to follow on Sept. 12 and Oct. 10.
    The hikes will be as easy to moderate and the pace will be slow as the group gathers seeds. Bring water, lunch, a hat, sunscreen and good walking shoes. Hikes will be in various locations around the Bandelier National Monument Visitor Center and Campground areas. Admission cost to Bandelier is waived for participants.
    Participants are asked to meet 8 a.m. Friday at the Juniper Campground in Bandelier National Monument. Hiking time will depend on location, but each seed collection hike will last approximately half a day.

  • Bike MS: Pedal los Pueblos, benefiting the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, will unite an estimated 425 cyclists and hundreds of volunteers and supporters on Saturday and Sunday.
    The annual two-day, cycling event features multiple route options for cyclists as they journey through northern New Mexico and its pueblos.
    The society aims to nearly $220,000 this year to support cutting-edge research and life-changing programs and services for people living with MS.
    Established in 1980, the National MS Society’s Bike MS program is the largest organized cycling series in the country with nearly 100 Bike MS rides offered nationwide in 2015.
    Last year, cyclists raised nearly $83 million to support MS research and programs delivered by the society’s 50-state network of chapters. Bike MS has raised over $1 billion since its inception. For cyclists and all those seeking a personal challenge and a world free of MS, Bike MS is the premier fundraising cycling series in the nation.

  • As September arrives, we discover National Attendance Awareness Month and Los Alamos Public Schools is excited to engage the entire community as to the importance of good attendance.
    “School is more fun when you have good attendance,” said Dr. Kurt Steinhaus, Los Alamos Public Schools superintendent. “It is easier to understand the assignments, the learning makes better sense, you are caught up, there is more time to ask questions, you are able to ‘stay on top’ of the work and it is easier to make good friends.”
    As part of Steinhaus’ back to school welcome message, he reminded students and families of key items that are important to student success including taking care of yourself, getting involved, planning, making good decisions, asking for help when you need it, having a good attitude and being true to yourself.
    While the ideas are meant for students, the message could also apply to community members. When youth see adults with role model behaviors like taking care of themselves and having a good attitude, the lessons are absorbed like a sponge and can create behaviors or patterns for a lifetime.