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Today's Features

  • The public can see and drive a variety of different robots at “Robotics Night” from 5 to 8 p.m., Friday at the Bradbury Science Museum. Robots from Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Hazardous Devices Team, the FIRST Robotics Clubs (high school and middle-school students), University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, First LEGO League and other local robotics enthusiasts are scheduled to be at the museum.
    Activities take place inside the downtown museum and in the surface parking outside adjacent to Central Avenue.
    Attendees can watch demonstrations on how the robots work and ask questions of robot operators. Also featured will be Sumo Bot battles. The Sumo robots are autonomous, battery-powered and controlled by an Arduino or a similar processor. Competitors will battle to push each other out of the ring with only their sensors and programming to guide them.
    For more information, visit lanl.gov/museum/events/happening-now.shtml.
     

  • The Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship Committee recently announced the recipients of the fourth annual scholarships, given to Navajo women who desire to serve their community and need help funding a challenging academic course of study.
    The recipient of this year’s $2,500 Julie’s Helpers Memorial Scholarship is Markie Bee, who is a senior at New Mexico Tech in Socorro.
    Bee is a single mom of a 3-year-old son, Orion Vicenti. “Being a single mom…it is a big relief getting any financial help,” she said.
    Bee is from Fruitland, a community between Shiprock and Farmington. She is working on receiving her bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with plans to graduate in May. She hopes to serve the Navajo tribe by working with oil and gas industries to ensure more efficient processes and minimalize environmental damage to Indian Country. Her future plans are to achieve a master’s degree and return to Farmington to pursue a career in the petroleum industry.
    According to a press release, Bee has a passion for chemistry and has volunteered through the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) to encourage other Native American youth to pursue college degrees. She will be the first in her family to graduate from college.

  • Today
    Los Alamos Community Blood Drive. Until 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 2200 Diamond Dr. For more information call United Blood Services at 877-UBS-HERO or 505-246-1457 to sign up. Bring photo ID and donor card. Free cholesterol testing with every donation.

    The Zone is now open after school, 3-5 p.m. weekdays. It’s open to all school age kids, and a relaxed attitude to noise applies, so if kids want to listen to music, watch a video, or chat with friends, nobody’s going to come by and say “Hush.” All other library policies apply.

    Science on Tap. 5:30-7 p.m. at the Blue Window Bistro. Bryce Tappan will discuss what LANL scientists have recently discovered about the chemical kinetics of burning nanoaluminum particles. For more information about this program visit lanl.gov/museum.

    Downtown Dogs. A weekly walking group for dogs and humans. The walk starts from Pet Pangaea at 6 p.m. on Thursday nights for a stroll around downtown Los Alamos. Bring a leash, no longer than six feet.

  • Tickets are now on sale for the High Tea and Fashion Show. The show starts at 3 p.m. Aug. 30 at at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, 2900 Trinity Drive in Kelly Hall. Fashions will be available for sale from Shop on the Corner, the Trinity on the Hill thrift shop. There will also be a silent auction with handmade items, gift certificates, time and talent donations and more. Tickets are $25, children 10 and under $10. Advance ticket purchases are recommended. To buy tickets call 662-5107.  
    All proceeds go to support two house building mission trips to Ciudad Juárez, Mexico this fall, one in October (House of Hope Women), one in November (Trinity Builders, co-ed team).
    The House of Hope and Trinity Builders house-building mission teams are sponsors for the fifth annual fundraising event.
    Just as last year, decorated tables, adorned with place settings and fresh flowers, will be the setting for the tea and homemade food items will be provided by team members and volunteers.
    Cups of tea will be served from “bottomless” teapots that will include black teas as well as a variety of herbal and flavored teas. Afternoon hats are encouraged and will certainly generate some lively conversation as friends chat and make new acquaintances at round tables of eight settings each.

  • As the Holocaust and Intolerance Museum of New Mexico comes of age, it’s honoring children who never got the chance.
    Marking 13 years of advocating tolerance, the museum celebrates its Bar Mitzvah year remembering the 1.5 million children murdered under the Nazi regime, many of whom didn’t live to see their own coming of age.
    The museum board invites the public to join special event and reception, 2 p.m. Sunday, in Congregation B’nai Israel, 4401 Indian School, NE, in Albuquerque.
    “We dedicate our Bar Mitzvah year remembering the innocents who met a cruel and senseless death brought on by hate and intolerance,” said Jerry Small, a museum representative. “We must never forget in order to end these atrocities that continue even today in countries ravaged by war.”
    During World War II, Adolf Hitler’s army and collaborators killed more than a million Jewish children, tens of thousands of Romani (Gypsy) children, German youth with physical and mental disabilities, Polish children, and innocents residing in the occupied Soviet Union, according to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. The chances for survival for Jewish and some non-Jewish adolescents (13-18 years old) were greater, only because they could be deployed at forced labor.

  • Severe weather struck many times earlier this month as monsoon season started. A representative from the National Weather Service recently held a class at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center to conduct a SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter class.
    Meteorologists from the NWS taught the basics of severe local storms, to include thunderstorms, flash floods, downburst winds, tornadoes and more. They also spoke of NWS operations, important safety information and how to stay prepared.
    During the class, participants had the chance to talk to NWS representatives about becoming an official SKYWARN™ Weather Spotter.
    Weather spotters are the “eyes and ears” of the NWS and provide valuable weather reports. Those interested often include citizens, amateur radio operators, CERT and Citizen
Corps personnel, law enforcement, fire, transportation and public works staff. Spotter reports, coupled with radar, satellite and other data, has enabled the NWS to issue more timely and accurate warnings and statements for types of hazardous weather.

  • “Blackbeard the Pirate” was performed last month by the Missoula Children’s Theater. The pirates from left, Peija Cole, William McTeigue, Xavier McTeigue, Elia Vasquez, Josh Fuller and Aliana Montoya.

  • The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe is now officially open for business.
    “We have had a successful week welcoming our first group of guests,” said Tauseen Malik, general manager of the Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe. “The feedback has been very positive, especially about our spacious, light-filled rooms and our great, friendly staff.  We pride ourselves on hospitality and for the ninth consecutive year, Drury Hotels has ranked in the top slot for Highest in Guest Satisfaction Among Mid-Scale Hotel Chains by J.D. Power. We are proud to be bringing that top service to Santa Fe.”
     The Drury Plaza Hotel in Santa Fe will be hosting numerous events this year. The hotel recently hosted the Women’s International Study Center’s symposium, with more than 300 panelists, including Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The hotel will also host to Santa Fe’s inaugural cyclocross event on Sept. 20.

  • Auto enthusiasts will
    emerge for Autumn Run

  • Los Alamos
    East Park Pool Snack Bar, 111 East Road
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One high-risk violation. Sanitizer at too high of concentration, which was corrected at time of inspection. Two moderate-risk violations. Thermometer needed inside refrigerator. Test strips needed for sanitizer.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    S-Site Café, TA-16, SM-192
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: None.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.

    Film Festival at Home, 3801 Arkansas Ave.
    Date inspected: June 23
    Violations: One low-risk violation. Restroom self closing device on door needs to work properly.
    Status of Establishment: Approved. No follow up required.