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Today's Features

  • Eighteen students from Los Alamos elementary schools and Los Alamos Middle School were at Chamisa Elementary recently for the 2015 County Spelling Bee. Over the last several months they’ve been attending school Word Clubs for practice through listening, writing and pronouncing thousands of words that could have been used in the Scripps National Spelling Bee and learning to think through the surprises. Most of the contestants are avid readers as well.
    First place went to the New Mexico Spelling Bee representative, Nora Cullinan, who is an 8th grader at Los Alamos Middle School.
    Second Place went to Olivia Koo, a 5th grader at Barranca and third place went to Sruthi Garimella, a 7th grader at LAMS.
    The last rounds with five spellers, included Philip Ionkov, a 5th grader at Aspen and Hannah Gartz, a 6th-grader from Piñon. Supporting the spellers were families, friends, and teachers who were there to cheer on all of the contestants.
    Spelling Bees have been in operation across the United States since 1925, with now-famous Scripps sponsorship beginning in 1941. Bees had been in place for many years and the smooth operation of the contest has been dependent on school-level coordinators, a school district facilitator, and supportive judges from throughout the county.

  • I learned many years ago that it is the friends, books, music, games and movies you surround yourself with that help create the person you become.
    Last week, I had the pleasure of making a presentation to the Leadership Los Alamos class of 2015, soon to be “the best class.”
    I loved Robin Williams and after he died last year, I noticed a movie he made I had not seen. Ah, technology and sure enough, you can request a movie and watch it within a few days.
    I’ll save you the pain of the movie, unless you are up for something deep and profoundly sad from, “What Dreams May Come.” The truth is two children are lost in a car accident and later the father passes in a second car accident.
    The profound part was an exchange between husband and wife about the son struggling in school. The mother wants to ease the workload and the father doesn’t because he knows the boy is capable.
    The movie later shows how another conversation where the boy admits to the dad, that he isn’t as smart as the dad and always feels like he’s letting him down.
    Flashback to the Leadership Los Alamos session where it was admitted that youth often feel like they are continuously a disappointment when they never make the grade or do, as well as parents expect.

  • Today
    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org.

    The Dust, Drought and Dreams Gone Dry exhibit in the Upstairs Art Gallery. On display daily through Feb. 20.

    Temporary exhibit: Saul Hertz, MD: A pioneer in the Use of Radioactive Isotopes. Daily through Jan. 31 at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Keep It Classy. Ongoing at the Fuller Lodge Art Center. Art inspired by classes and art groups that meet in the Art Center. Pottery, paintings, photography, jewelry, etc. The exhibit shows work created in classes during 2014, as well as work by participants in the Los Alamos Photography Club, Adobe Users Group, Life Drawing Group, Ashley Pond Woodworkers and the Beader Babes. Runs daily through Jan. 31.

    The Paintings of Francis Harlow: Portraits & Pottery. Ongoing through February at the Los Alamos History Museum.
    Wednesday
    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

  • The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:
    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html
    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday and noon-3 p.m. Sunday.
    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.
    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.
    CATS
    Cordelia — A short haired, all-black cat with a tiny little white patch on her chest and a small notch out of her ear. She was trapped on 48th Street on New Year’s Eve, and she was certainly happy to be somewhere warm for the new year! She is extremely friendly, and now that she has received a clean bill of health, she’s ready for her own warm, indoor home.

  • Jan. 8: A boy, Jayceon Salazar, born to Eryana and Julian Salazar
    Jan. 15: A girl, Kayleigh Suzanne Hollowell, born to Brittany and Ben Hollowell
    Jan. 17: A boy, Elisa Daniel Mora, born to Samantha Jo Martinez and Isidro Urias Mora

  • Jan. 25-31, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Pasta primavera
    12:15 p.m.    Smart Driver course
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.    Variety training
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Tilapia
    1 p.m.         MindBody massage
    1:30 p.m.    “Friends”
    6 p.m.        Mahjong
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.    Table Tennis

    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.    LAVA quilters
    8:45 a.m.    Cardio plus exercise
    10:45 a.m.    Music with Ruth
    11:30 a.m.    Lunch: Chicken chile             cheese soup
    1:30 p.m.    Daytime duplicate             bridge

  • The Los Alamos Choral Society and the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra will be having its winter concert, once again under the direction of Music Director Mary Badarak and accompanied by Cindy Little.
    More than 70 singers and 35-40 members of the Los Alamos Symphonic Orchestra will grace the stage at 4 p.m. Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church. This year’s concert has an unusually large group of participants this year, according to coordinator Chuck Tallman. “It’s an amazing for this little town,” he said. The number of participants have continued to grow as the years go by.
    Tallman has been involved with the choral society for 43 years. “I’ve always been active in it and it is one of the main reasons I stay in Los Alamos,” Tallman said, who worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory for more than 30 years and is treasurer of the choral society.
    Two programs will be presented. First, will be Anitonia Viavaldi’s “Gloria,” followed by  Mozart’s Vesperae Solennes de Confessore K. 339. The text for both will contain an English translations.

  • Los Alamos High School freshmen counselor Michelle Harrison, along with co-sponsors Sherri Smith and Family Resource Advocate, Troy Palmer spent the first weekend in November at the Sipapu Ski Resort for the Natural Helpers Fall Retreat. The JJAB collaboration yielded the training of 18 new Natural Helpers students and a refresher for three returning members.
    The goal of Natural Helpers is to help and support other students, to learn ways of caring for themselves and each other, and to help foster a safe and supportive environment in their school and community.
    A theme that seemed to return for the team was that everyone is special in their own way and how important it is emphasize the uniqueness of each individual and what they bring to the group.
    “We had an amazing time and formed a tremendous bond with one another,” Harrison said. “I look forward to working with each of them and getting to know the additional members as the year progresses.”
    As one of their many projects, the Natural Helpers brought about a weeklong event earlier this month called, The Attitudes of Gratitude Bucket Challenge. The students worked to man tables allowing students and staff to identify the many things they are thankful for in life on a daily basis. Their goal was to fill a 5-gallon bucket by the end of the week.

  • The 28th Annual Taos Winter Wine Festival will be uncorking a palatable blend of new additions to the event including an Aprés Ski Tasting at the newly remodeled TSV Resort Center and chairlift access to Taos Ski Valley’s Kachina Peak along with the return of key festival events including the Grand Tasting, Reserve Tasting, wine-paired dinners and seminars.
    Taos’ best restaurants will serve their finest signature appetizers paired with tastes of reserve wines from 40 participating wineries during the Reserve Tasting from 4-6 p.m. Jan. 29. The evening includes a silent auction of wines to benefit the Taos High School Culinary Arts Program. The cost is $75 per person and will be at the El Monte Sagrado Resort.
    Master Sommelier Joseph Spellman will be joined by importer Charles Neal to lead an Old World versus New World Blind Tasting with four pairs of wines on Jan. 29 at El Monte Sagrado Resort — a great way to test one’s wine knowledge and learn at the same time. The “Old World vs. New World Blind Tasting” seminar begins at 2:30 p.m. Cost is $50 per person. Tickets can be purchased online at taoswinterwinefest.com.

  • The Family YMCA is celebrating National Mentoring Month throughout January by continuing to bring awareness about the Y’s Reach & Rise youth mentoring program and the ongoing need for caring adults in Los Alamos.
    Being a caring adult is great, but when caring adults put forth caring actions it changes the course of a child’s life. Youth mentoring guarantees to a young person that somebody cares about them.
    During the month of January, Reach & Rise is looking for five Los Alamos adults over the age of 23 to participate in the next Reach & Rise youth mentoring training.
    Kim, a Reach & Rise Y mentor talks about why she chooses to mentor a Los Alamos youth. “I have always loved the movie ‘The Sound of Music,’ and I always especially loved the relationship between Maria (the new governess of the Von Trapp children) and the Liesl (the eldest of the seven Von Trapp children). From the outset, Liesl von Trapp claims, ‘I don’t need a governess,’ but Liesl quickly and repeatedly learns about the great help and guidance that she can receive from governess Maria.”
    Like Liesl and the rest of the Von Trapp children, many mentors have had similar guide, such as sisters, brothers, aunties, godparents, or even that babysitter who also came to all of the kinder-kick games.