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Today's Features

  • Santa arrives Saturday, Nov. 18, at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The Festival of Trees from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. is a fund raiser for youth and senior programs.

    The trees will be on display throughout the week during regular senior center hours. Admission Saturday is free, but hard candy, snacks and lunch items for students are gratefully requested.

    Call 662-8920 for information and check back next week for photos of the 2017 trees.

  • The United Church of Los Alamos celebrated their life of service last weekend as they marked their 70th anniversary.

    On Friday, many church members sliced, diced and chopped their way to a celebratory dinner. Volunteers worked to prepare an old recipe from the Women’s Christian Service Society for a chicken enchilada dinner.

    So many congregation members brought home-made pies that even after hundreds of pieces of pie were served and a blessing given to take some home, a bevy were served after the Sunday service, alongside cake.

    The dinner was very well attended by those seniors that were a part of the church as young children and the young families of today. The elder members seemed pleased with the fact that even though many familiar faces were present, there were equally a number of new ones.

  • Navajo poet Sherwin Bitsui will read his poetry at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos at 1 p.m. Nov. 15 in the UNM-LA Library as part of the celebration of National Native American Heritage Month on campus.

    A Diné (Navajo), Bitsui studied at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe and now teaches for the MFA in Creative Writing for the IAIA. His honors include the 2011 Lannan Literary Fellowship, a Native Arts & Culture Foundation Fellowship for Literature, a PEN Open Book Award, an American Book Award and a Whiting Writers Award.

    Bitsui, also a painter, described how he tries to capture images in words. “My poems come first from a sense of image, texture, color. In Navajo, we process thoughts and speak from a language that has different sensibilities. It includes a view of the land, plant life, animal life as part of the everyday perspective. To navigate in English is like moving through a different consciousness.”

    At his readings, Bitsui asks the audience to close their eyes and watch the poem happen, to inhabit the place of the poem, as a way to journey in real time.

    The community is invited to attend the reading. Visit losalamos.unm.edu/sherwin-bitsui-poet.html for more information.

  • Every dog has its day, it’s said.

    Ellie’s day hasn’t happened yet – and that’s a golden opportunity for you.

    She’s shy and sweet and just beginning to know that there’s more out there.

    Like a trail and a leash and a person who is confident and wise – someone who’s willing to show her that she’s got a lot to give, too.

    She’s available for adoption at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter. There’s an adoption fee of $75.

    At less than 18 months old, Ellie is a mixed breed, and medium-sized, with Australian cattle dog strongly indicated.

    She’s spayed, vaccinated and micro-chipped.

    Around other dogs, it would be best they are near her size, and if children are present, it’s best they are at least 8 years old.

    She needs a secure yard and someone who understands what a dog needs – kindness, patience and a bit of training.

    The shelter is at 226 East Road. More information is available by calling (505) 662-8179.

  • The Los Alamos VFW Post 8874 will hold a Veterans Day Ceremony at 11 a.m. at Ashley Pond to honor veterans Saturday. The special ceremony will include a color guard and trumpet player.

    Following the ceremony, the public is invited to the VFW for a celebration, at 1793 Deacon St., Los Alamos.
    The American Legion Frank G. Frainier Post 90 in Los Alamos is planning a steak dinner and live music night on Veterans Day Saturday.

    Legion members, the public and anyone eligible for membership is welcome for the steak dinner that starts at 4 p.m. in the dining hall at 1325 Trinity Drive, said Commander Linda Fox.

    The dinner costs $15 for a ribeye steak, loaded baked potato, salad, roll, dessert and soft drink. To reserve a dinner, call the American Legion at 662-7772 before 8 p.m. Thursday.

    Following the dinner, members and anyone eligible to join the legion – which includes anyone who was in the military, or parents, or siblings of those in the military – can stay for the live music that starts at 6 p.m. in the bar area.

    Bat Bennett, a well-known musician, will play his special mix of tunes in the bar.

    “People really get involved,” Fox said. “He’s really a very good entertainer.”

  • Fees at many recreation sites and amenities at the Santa Fe National Forest will be waived over Veterans Day weekend on Saturday and Sunday.

    Fees at all national forests and grasslands will be waived at many day-use sites, such as picnic grounds and developed trailheads, in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act.

    Other agencies also participating in the fee-free days including the National Park Service, Bureau of Land Managements and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

    The fee-free availability includes sites in the Santa Fe National Forest which normally charge day-use fees and campgrounds. Site on the National Reservation System are not fee-free, according to a press release from the Santa Fe National Forest.

    If you plan to visit, “know before you go,” by checking the weather forecast and being prepared for seasonal fluctuations.

    Follow basic safety precautions for hiking, fishing and camping in the national forest.

    Although fire danger is somewhat lower, campfire safety and prevention is always a priority while outdoors, according to the press release.

    Never leave a campfire unattended and make sure it is out and cold before leaving your campsite.

  • Registration is now open for the annual WinterFest Holiday Lights Parade. This year’s “Woodland” themed parade will march up Central Avenue beginning at 6 p.m. Dec 2.

    The official tree lighting ceremony will follow the parade at 7 p.m. around Ashley Pond.

    To participate in the parade, visit eventbrite.com/e/los-alamos-winterfest-holiday-lights-parade-2017-registration-37288847948.

    Los Alamos celebrates winter with many events scheduled around town, and The Holiday Lights Parade is the highlight of the WinterFest weekend. For more information and a full schedule of WinterFest events, visit losalamosmainstreet.com/events/winterfest/.

    Los Alamos MainStreet, and the LACDC, would like to extend a sincere thanks to the WinterFest sponsors: Los Alamos National Bank and Los Alamos County. 

    MainStreet welcomes more WinterFest sponsors, and those interested in sponsoring should contact Suzette Fox, MainStreet executive director at suzette@losalamos.org, or KayLinda Crawford, MainStreet event coordinator at kaylinda@losalamos.org.

  • The Los Alamos History Museum will present a lecture by Sharon Snyder at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge, called “How Los Alamos Became a Ranch School:  A Homesteader’s Farmhouse, a Few Sheds, and a Muddy Puddle of Water.”

    The lecture is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s 2017-2018 lecture series “100 Years on the Pajarito Plateau.” This lecture series is sponsored by Raffi Andonian and Nicole Kiebert.

    The ranch school that existed here between 1917 and 1943 was special, and developed into one of the best schools of its kind throughout the West, earning a national reputation among all prep schools. Sharon Snyder will be presenting a talk on topics ranging from how Ashley Pond Jr. ended up in New Mexico and became the partner of Harold Brook, the homesteader whose land eventually held the school, to who financed the expansion of the school as it grew, and why did the boys wear shorts in the winter and sleep on screened porches year round? Learn the answers to these questions and more at the third lecture in the 2017-2018 Historical Society’s lecture series this Tuesday.

    Snyder is the award-winning biographer, author and poet of Peggy Pond Church, as well as the Publications Director of Bathtub Row Press, the publishing house of the Los Alamos Historical Society.

  • November is Native American Heritage month. An additional focus takes place the day after Thanksgiving, called Native American Heritage Day.

    Jessica “Jaylyn” Atsye of the Laguna Pueblo began an event in 2010 called Rock Your Mocs Week. This year the week takes place Nov. 12-18. It will be the third year Los Alamos supports the effort by Rockin our Mocs.

    It is a chance for Native Americans, both youth and adults, from all backgrounds, to wear their moccasins for a day or the week and share their pride and culture. The traditional moccasins are as different as the people who will wear them.

    A friend of mine, Deb Minyard from Pojoaque High School, received a pair as a gift when she was the 2015 New Mexico Teacher of the Year. Her student, Nessa, asked if she could give her a handmade pair as a gift. When Minyard accepted, the student measured her feet in the traditional way, by tracing them.

    The handmade moccasins were crafted by Bernard Mora of the Tesuque Pueblo. The beautiful gift brought Minyard to tears, making her feel like a part of the student’s family. Minyard considers the gift one of her most treasured possessions.

  • Permits to cut your own Christmas tree on the Santa Fe National Forest go on sale Monday at forest headquarters at all ranger district offices and select third-party vendors.

    As part of the “Every Kid in a Park” initiative, every fourth-grader is eligible for a free holiday tree permit.  In order to redeem the free permit, the student must present a valid fourth-grade pass, downloadable at everykidinapark.gov.

    Once the pass is printed out, the fourth-graders must bring a parent or guardian over the age of 18 with them to the nearest SFNF office to pick up the permit. The free permits can only be fulfilled at a Santa Fe National Forest office.

    The nonrefundable Christmas tree permits are for personal use only and may be purchased for $10 by check, credit/debit card or cash through Dec. 23. Permit purchasers will receive a tree tag, map and guidelines for harvesting a tree.

    One tag is valid for a tree up to 5-inches in diameter and 10-feet in height. Trees taller than 10 feet and/or wider than 5-inches require an additional tag. For example, a 15-foot tree requires two tags.

    The Santa Fe National Forest has a three-tag limit per person.