.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Teen Pulse

  • Word on the Street 1-18-15

    Teen Pulse staff writer Rigel Baron asked students, “What are your plans for the upcoming three-day weekend?”

  • Chemistry told through scientists’ the eyes

    “Crucibles: The Story of Chemistry,” by Bernard Jaffe is a nonfiction science book utterly unlike thousands of others — at once dramatic, personal and educational, too.
    The book opens in the early years of the 15th century, with the story of Bernard Trevisan, a wealthy heir who surrounded himself for decades with alchemy and a golden dream, only to die unsuccessful, bitter and poor.
    From there, the life stories of more than 20 other scientists, scattered throughout the centuries from the 1400s through World War II, are told. Here one can find the dynamic personalities of Lavoisier, Dalton and Avogadro, Woehler, Mendeleev and Bohr. They studied everything from alchemy to the periodic table to the world of the atom and the atomic bomb.
    Amongst these colorful characters, there was never a boring moment, even outside the laboratory.
    Take for example Henry Moseley, nicknamed “Harry.” As an energetic and remarkably fearless young man, Harry revolutionized the periodic table before being shot through the head in the trenches of World War I only two months later. As soon as his career began, Moseley was gone.

  • Misconceptions about hookah

    It is common knowledge that smoking cigarettes is detrimental to one’s health, but some methods such as hookah are thought by many youth not to be harmful.
    Hookahs are water pipes used to smoke special tobacco that can come in many different flavors. According to the American Lung Association (ALA), hookah smoking has many of the same health risks as cigarette smoking including oral cancer, lung cancer and decreased fertility.
    Hookah use originated in ancient Persia and India, but is now gaining popularity with teenagers in many European countries and in the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, hookah use is increasing among youth and college students.
    Because of this trend, organizations such as the multinational youth-led Evolvement movement are undertaking campaigns to raise awareness about the dangers of tobacco use through cigarettes and hookah.
    Members of Evolvement need to be part of a participating high school and are required to go through training with an Evolvement coordinator.
    Evolvement New Mexico has started a campaign called Clear the Haze. This campaign specifically targets young people to educate them that hookah smoking is as dangerous as cigarette smoking.

  • Word on the Street 1-11-14

    Teen Pulse staff members Tom Hanlon and Melisssa Wysocki asked students, “Do you have any predictions about what will happen in 2015”

  • Lewis & Todd 1-11-15
  • Students advise administrators on new dance regulations

    The Los Alamos High School’s Topper Advisory Council (TAC) has recently reviewed and approved a new set of guidelines, created by the student council, pertaining to dress code and other school rules for high school dances. The TAC, a council consisting of members belonging to the LAHS staff, student population, and parents, provides advice to the principal on school related issues. With a membership of about 20, this group of hardworking individuals meets monthly and is committed to making a positive and influential impact on the high school.
    After tireless effort to revise the old code, members of the high school’s student council created a new set of dance rules due to previous misconceptions, misinterpretations and an overall negative reaction from high school students in relation to the previous dance regulations.
    LAHS senior Jodi Thomas said, “I think that the main problem about what happened was not the rules, but how late they were released.” Others felt differently though, asserting that the rules regarding strapless dresses, dress thigh height and open back dresses needed revisions. Regardless, both issues have been solved with a revision and approval of the new rules more than five months before the high school’s next big dance, Prom.

  • Movie Review: Legendary story takes on new spin

    Everything needs a foundation, and director Peter Jackson lays a fitting corner stone for the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy with his latest epic finale, “The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies.”
    Picking up the action from the cliffhanger at the end of the second movie, the villagers of Laketown flee the ruins of their wooden village, destroyed by Smaug the dragon (Benedict Cumberbatch).
    The dwarves prepare the mountain for siege, while, Gandalf (Ian McKellen), Galadriel (Cate Blanchet), Elrond (Hugo Weaving) and Saruman (Christopher Lee) confront the nine kings returned from the dead, and find an old enemy.
    In front of the mountain, the refuges of Laketown and the wood elves prepare a siege to claim a part of the treasure.
    Tensions escalate as Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) negotiates to prevent a skirmish. Despite his efforts, the dwarves of the Iron Hills arrive to defend the mountain. Before the armies of men, elves and dwarves can meet, Azog (Manu Bennett) and his force of orcs, by a second force of orcs from the north, attack. At the climax of the storyline, the five armies battle to decide the fate of Middle Earth.

  • Lewis & Todd 1-4-15
  • Word on the Street 1-4-15

    Teen Pulse staff writer Ben Hanlon asked students, “What is your new year’s resolution?”

  • From Leather to Lace: Tailor made for the new year

    ...Five, four, three, two, one! The big apple drops and it’s officially 2015.
    With a fresh year in mind it is no surprise that fashion tops my resolution list.
    For those of you struggling to piece together a fashion resolution, take into account the two sides of the fashion resolution scale to find your tailor made resolution.
    On one end is minimalism, a style characterized by extreme spareness or simplicity. From the fashionista’s perspective, minimalism exudes subtlety and elegance. These nuances are evident in higher-end pieces that fall under the minimalist category.
    Fashion runways today bear eccentric and avant-garde draperies, jewels and footwear. Sometimes, such items are thrilling to see on the runway, but cannot be worn in public on a regular day to day basis. Of course, we all need that special dress for the cocktail party next Saturday or the sky high heels for Lucy’s wedding on Wednesday, but are those items really necessary?
    William Zinsser, author of “On Writing Well,” tells us to “simplify, simplify, simplify.” This simplifying process applies to fashion, as well as writing.
    Will “detoxing” style put you through both a physical and mental catharsis? I leave the experiment to you.