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Teen Pulse

  • It was a pretty bad debate

    On Oct. 3, the first of three presidential debates between President Barack Obama and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney took place.
    During the debate, we witnessed two very different men with two different ideas for the future of America. However, I feel that neither of the two candidates truly gave any details for how they were going to accomplish their policies.
    During their discourse, neither candidate seemed to answer any of the questions posed to them and spent most of the debate returning to the same subjects. It was almost as if both presidential candidates had prepared what they wished to say during the debate and did not plan on answering questions.
    Nonetheless, unlike Obama, Romney somehow managed to introduce his points in a way that made it appear as if he were answering the questions, while Obama appeared to be utterly lost as he rambled on, without any attempt to answer the questions posed to him.
    Overall, the media have made it clear that Romney won this first debate, which is not uncommon for a challenger.

  • Word on the Street 10-07-12

    Teen Pulse staff member Owen Bradbury-Aranda asked students, “Which candidate do you think should win this year’s
    election?”

  • Andrew and Mousie 10-07-12
  • Marilyn Manson brings listeners hell on Earth

    Humans have always been fascinated with the mythology of heaven and hell and whether there is life after death.
    One doesn’t need to look too far to find a piece of hell on Earth. We’re not talking about a hot place with a horned red guy wielding a pitchfork, but instead a shock rock group that would make Lucifer himself shiver.
    Brian Warner, aka Marilyn Manson, has been shocking audiences with blood, mutilation and a commanding stage presence for almost 25 years.
    “Born Villain” is the eighth full-length studio album from Manson and perhaps one of the best to date.
    Manson has not been without his share of issues, however. After the release of 1998’s “Mechanical Animals,” Manson’s music and lyrical content lost the edginess that made him infamous.
    After numerous albums that weren’t as popular as the earlier ones, “Born Villain,” which he began recording in 2009, breathed life back into the band. Released May 1, 2012, the album debuted at number 10 on the Billboard 200, and sold more than 38,000 copies in its first week.
    This album is for the faithful Manson fans that liked the pre-“Mechanical Animals” era.  He shied away from the computers and studio effects that were heavily used in previous studio albums.

  • A new responsibility for students

    Teenagers tend to associate the month of November with cold temperatures, Thanksgiving, hot cocoa and cuddling by fireplaces.
    But how often do the words “presidential election” pop into teens’ minds at the mention of November? And do they even care?
    Some students 18 and older may have already decided to participate in next month’s elections.
    Yet, there are probably many teenagers that have reached the voting age that are unsure about voting.
    “Why even vote?” “How can I do so?” and “When do I register?” are all questions asked by those hesitant to go to the polls because they are not informed about the election process.
    For the most part, adolescents live in a bubble. If their parents vote, they help make decisions for the United States by doing so. At the age of 18, though, the bubble pops and young adults are left with the responsibility to cast their own vote. While some teens are eager to exercise their right as an American, others ask, “Why should I vote?
    According to Michael Montaño, a government teacher at Los Alamos High School, “Most of the decisions made today are going to have the longest impact on (teenagers).” In other words, young adults that vote are taking their future into their own hands.

  • Word on the Street 09-30-12

    Teen Pulse staff member Tom Hanlon asked students, “What did you think about the apocalypse theme for homecoming?”

  • Andrew and Mousie 09-30-12
  • Poetry Corner 09-30-12

    Illumination

    Across the endless, flat land sunken in the dark,

    the highway is a string of fairy lights,

    the moon is your lonely reflection.

    The sheet of paper I drive on is soaked in black ink.

    The highway is a string of fairy lights.
    Flat mountains, flat land make eerie outlines.

    The sheet of paper I drive on is still soaked in black ink.

    And the fog is thick.

    Flat mountains, flat land make eerie outlines.

    Your tendrils of brilliance begin to tickle the nearly impenetrable quiet.

    And the fog is thick.
    Coyote howls, and bear bares his teeth in an almighty grin.

    Your tendrils of brilliance begin to tickle the nearly impenetrable quiet.

    The rock is a chameleon, from black to orange.

    Coyote howls, and bear bares his teeth in an almighty grin.

    Sunrise. How I long for you, sunrise.

    The rock is a chameleon, from black to orange,

    across the endless, flat land sunken in the dark.

    Sunrise. How I long for you, sunrise.

    The moon is your lonely reflection.

    —Alexandra Hehlen

  • Fashion Maven: My passion for trashion

    As soon as I read about a trash fashion workshop at Fuller Lodge directed by designer Nancy Judd, I knew that this opportunity was one I could not miss out on. I found out that there would be a Trashion Show in Los Alamos, where I could model my design, so I signed myself up immediately and went to the workshop bursting with ideas.
    Judd’s workshop was fantastic. An internationally renowned trashion designer, Judd creates clothing from recycled or recyclable materials to raise awareness about the fact that many recyclable products are going to waste.
    She showed us pictures of some of her work, which included a gown made of more than 2,000 pieces of glass, a dress made from plastic bags and a bag adorned with nails. Judd has also done commissions for Delta Airlines, Coca-Cola, and Target.
    All the participants in the workshop shared their ideas for their designs and afterward, the room was charged with feelings of creativity. We soon got to work, and I began to construct my dress, which I had sketched out the day before.
    By the end of the workshop, I had finished about half of the construction of the bodice and the detail on the shoulders.
    In the next three weeks, I spent my free time designing for the fashion show.

  • Word on the Street 09-23-12

     Teen Pulse staff members Robert Nafziger and Ben Hanlon asked students, “What do you think about the middle school construction?”