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Teen Pulse

  • Teacher Feature: Mr. A talks about his life as a teen

    Allen Andraski, affectionately dubbed “Mr. A.” by his students is the World History and AP Human Geography teacher at Los Alamos High School. His love for music and a passion for history easily makes him one of the most interesting teachers. Mr. A. dwells in the depths of E-Wing and is one of the few teachers to have refused to leave his old memory filled room for a classroom in the new building. He is always interested in meeting new people and has a love for teaching kids about the world and its culture.

    Last week Teen Pulse staff member, Owen Bradbury Aranda, took a stroll down memory lane with the teacher by asking him questions about the early days.

     

    Q: Where did you go to high school?

     

  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 11-03-13

    Monday: Fabulous foliage art

    Tuesday: Pumpkin seed spiting

    Wednesday: Movies and munchies

    Thursday: Foosball tournament

    Friday: Kids choice

    The Los Alamos Youth Activity Center is located at 475 20th St., next to Ashley Pond, 662-9412. The White Rock Activity Center is located at
    10 Sherwood Blvd., across from Smith’s in Rocket Park, 672-1565.  

  • Comic By Wilbur Wang
  • ‘Rush’ certainly Oscar worthy

    Although motor sports are not uncommon in the U.S., Formula One is a sport that may seem foreign to many Americans.
    It is definitely a more European sport but that doesn’t make it a spectacle unfit for American audiences.
    Rush, written by Peter Morgan and directed by Academy Award winning director Ron Howard, captures the brutality and raw essence of this motor sport in the 70s, during the 1976 Formula One season.
    Rather than simply making another shallow racing film aimed at car enthusiasts, Howard, known for films such as Apollo 13 and A Beautiful Mind, manages to take the exhilarating sport of F1 and bring to life one of the greatest rivalries in the history of the motor sport.
    The film focuses more on the human aspect of racing and the lives and risks of the drivers themselves.
    The two legendary rivals in the film, James Hunt played by Chris Hemsworth and Niki Lauda played by Daniel Brühl, are portrayed as very genuine characters: incredibly skilled, audacious, daring, but also very flawed. Hemsworth’s portrayal of Hunt is incredibly compelling and captures the “cavalier party guy” attitude of the British racing driver, and depicts him as an incredibly talented individual with smilingly great confidence who hides behind a facade of invincibility and arrogance.

  • Word on the Street 11-03-13

     Teen Pulse staff members Kenzi Hunsaker and Lily Johnson asked LAHS students, “What were you for Halloween?”

  • Youth Activity Center Schedule 10-27-13

    Monday: Pool tournament

    Tuesday: Pirates’ loot popcorn bag

    Wednesday: Movies and munchies

    Thursday: Votive fence scene

    Friday: Staff choice

    The centers are open from 3-6 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday; and from noon to 6 p.m. Wednesday. Memberships are free and open to all third through eighth graders. The White Rock AC is at 10 Sherwood Blvd., 672-1565. The LAAC is at 475 20th St., 662-9412.

  • Art teacher receives honorary award

    Michelle Grove, Los Alamos Middle School art teacher, won an Artsonia Leadership award last month. Los Alamos Middle School is ranked third in the state for connecting parents and students to the importance of art education, and for bringing technology integration into the art program.
    “Artsonia is an online children’s art museum where students can display their artwork for worldwide public viewing, Grove said. “Receiving an award from Artsonia means you have earned the honor of being a leader in art education.”
    Grove earned that honor.
    “I feel like I worked hard to connect family and friends to school. I also love showing off my students’ artwork,” Grove said when asked about being an honorary recipient of the Artsonia award.  

  • Haunted places in Los Alamos

    As Halloween approaches, many people begin to tell the tales of possible haunted places located within Los Alamos.
    During the 1950s, the high school’s auditorium was known to host various performances throughout the year. According to the accounts of locals, a young woman during a performance ascended a staircase near the stage.
    Somehow she lost her footing and fell to her death.
    To this day, students say they feel hands trying to push them down the stairs, and some also say they feel those hands when they are in the auditorium.
    This story has never actually been proven, but this is one of the reasons why they filmed the movie “Let Me ln” in Los Alamos.
    Another place that is said to be haunted is on the old highway before the modern highway was built to travel into Los Alamos. There was a one-lane bridge connecting Los Alamos and White Rock. The bridge was old and somewhat dilapidated.
    There are different stories told about this bridge.
    One states that a young woman walked along the side of the bridge during a dark night, and she saw bright headlights approaching. She was so startled, she fell to her death.
    lt is said that late at night a ghostly woman walking along the bridge can be seen, particularly as a vehicle approaches it.

  • RSD awareness

    Relex Sympathetic Dystrophy, or Regional Pain Syndrome, is a rare disease that not many people know about.
    The mother of Amber Cline, a student at Los Alamos Middle School, suffers from this rare disease.

    Teen Pulse: What is RSD?
    Cline: RSD is a chronic disease that affects the sympathetic nerve, causing pain throughout the body. lt also sends a misfire to the brain, spreading pain.

    Teen Pulse: How does it affect your everyday life?
    Cline: This limits everyday activities. You’re not able to do things most people are able to do.

    Teen Pulse: Is there a cure for RSD?
    Cline: Not exactly. At early stages, stem cells can be placed in your spinal cord to reset it, but it doesn’t always work.

    Teen Pulse: What causes it?
    Cline: Sympathetic nerve misfires.

    Teen Pulse: What things does RSD make harder to do?
    Cline: When you’re injured, you aren’t able to heal. The limbs you use the most will be affected the most.

    Teen Pulse: What are the most common symptoms with RSD?
    Cline: After a few weeks of injury, it will become red and puffy.

    Teen Pulse: Is there anything about RSD that you’d like people to know?
    Cline: RSD is a serious condition among many people in the United States.

  • Word on the Street 10-20-13

    Teen Pulse staff member Ben Hanlon asked LAHS students, “What is your favorite fall activity?”