• WR Baptist Church says farewell to Pastor Chuck

    White Rock Baptist Church said farewell to Pastor Chuck McCullough on Sept. 10 with an ice-cream social.
    Pastor Chuck, as he was called fondly by members of the congregation, had been senior pastor at White Rock Baptist Church since July 1, 1986.

    McCullough said he felt God had been leading him to leave the church because that is what is best for the church. He had been pastor of White Rock Baptist Church for 31 years. The church has flourished under his leadership, but he said he was excited about where God will lead the church in the future.

    White Rock Baptist was started in 1969 as a mission outreach from First Baptist Church in Los Alamos.

    In 1970, the new church bought property along State Road 4, and in 1972 the first church building was completed on the property. A second building was completed in 1978. In August 1997, a sewer backup in a county line caused a major flood in the building on Sunday morning.

    The old building had to be decontaminated.

  • Holy Fire from Jerusalem arrives in Los Alamos

    Father Theophan and parishioner Emrys Tennessen, of Saint Job of Pochaiv Orthodox Church in Los Alamos traveled Wednesday to Alamosa, Colorado to rendezvous with Jordanna Lynch Perry of the Archangel Michael Orthodox Church in Pueblo, Colorado to receive the flame which originated this year in Jerusalem on Pascha night.
    They also stopped at the Monastery of the Holy Archangel Michael in Canones, New Mexico, on their way home, to pass the fire to the brothers there.
    The Holy Fire is a miracle that occurs on the eve of Pascha each year. At the appointed time, the Patriarch of Jerusalem enters the Holy Sepulcher where Jesus Christ was buried for three days, without any fire-making implements and unlit candles.
    There he waits for the Holy Fire to descend and ignite the candles, after which he emerges from the sepulcher and the fire is passed to the faithful.
    Lamps lit from this fire are sent all over the world to Orthodox churches. This year is the first time a concerted effort was made to make it available in the United States.
    Over the past three weeks it has spread, person to person, parish to parish, all across the country, and now to Los Alamos.

  • Local church effort goes a long way to help immigrants in Otero County

    Special to the Monitor

  • Church youth to give presentation on Mexico house build trip

    The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • Create and hide unbreakable Easter eggs

    Easter is one of the most important days of the year for Christians. Easter Sunday is filled with symbolism and tradition, some of which harken back to early Christianity, while others trace their origins to paganism.
    The Easter Bunny and Easter eggs are two Easter traditions with less extensive histories. The Easter Bunny, according to sources including History.com, first arrived in America in the 1700s via German settlers who brought with them their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase.” Children would make nests where the rabbit could lay its colored eggs. Eventually, the custom spread from Pennsylvania, where many German immigrants settled, to other areas around the country.
    Eggs are symbolic of new life and rebirth in many cultures. To Christians, eggs represent the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
    Another theory suggests that Christians were once forbidden to eat during the Lenten season preceding Easter. Therefore, Christians would paint and decorate eggs for Easter to mark the joyous celebration and cessation of penance and fasting.
    Even though these traditions have endured, Easter eggs themselves might not be so strong. This year, Easter celebrants may want to experiment with different materials that are more forgiving and more enduring than standard eggs.
    Wooden eggs

  • Church group to leave for Mexico

    Volunteers from the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will form a Circle of Love Saturday morning, as they prepare to leave for Puerto Penasco, Mexico, to build homes for the poor.
    The 50-plus-member team will build for three families this week, including a 78-year-old mother and her daughter that make $35 a week, a five-member family that makes $42 a week and a six-member family that makes $170 a week.
    As they do a formal key ceremony of Friday for each family, giving them the keys to their first real home, the team tells each family that the house is a gift and they owe them nothing for their work.
    The team will arrive back in Los Alamos Saturday night.

  • How to use digital devices this Lent for holy reflection

    Texas A&M University

  • Women helping women
  • Church of Christ to host 5th-annual Women’s Mini-Conference

    “Ripples of Kindness” is the theme of the fifth annual county-wide “Women2Women” mini-conference to be held Saturday at Los Alamos Church of Christ.
    The mini-conference, which seeks to connect Los Alamos women with each other and with God, will be from 9 a.m. to noon at the church located at 2323 Diamond Drive.
    The morning of Christian fellowship, mutual encouragement, and spiritual strengthening is open to all women of the community. The event is free. Tea and finger foods will be served.
    The church began sponsoring the county-wide conference in 2013 and has followed-up each year since. The plan is to hold an annual conference for all nine “fruit of the Spirit” as listed in the Apostle Paul’s biblical letter to the Galatians, chapter 5, verses 22 and 23.  
    The event features two local women talking on ways that Christian women can show Godly kindness to each other and to those around them.

  • The season of Lent and Easter

    Spring is eagerly anticipated, as many people look forward to enjoying the great outdoors once more. Spring is also a special time of year for practicing Christians.
    Beginning on Ash Wednesday and lasting 40 weekdays until the arrival of Easter Sunday, the Lenten season is a very important time of year for Christians. During Lent, Christians prepare for Easter by observing a period of fasting, repentance, self-denial, and spiritual discipline. While the Bible does not reference Lent, the practice of observing Lent has become a standard.
    The following focuses on each of the special days of this church season as they pertain to Western Christianity.
    Ash Wednesday
    The Day of Ashes commemorates the repentance of sin. On Ash Wednesday, Christians have ashes placed on their foreheads in the shape of a cross in recognition of their need to repent.
    Palm Sunday
    On what is now called “Palm Sunday,” Jesus Christ rode a donkey into Jerusalem while villagers welcomed him and waved palm branches. This is mentioned in each of the Biblical Gospels and occurs a week before His subsequent resurrection. Jesus possibly rode a donkey rather than a horse as a sign of peace, as a war-waging king might ride a horse.
    Holy Thursday